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TRAVELS

ThROUGh ThE

UNITED KINGDOM,

IN PROMOTING ThE CAUSE OP

PEACE ON EARTH

AND

GOOD-WILL TOWARDS MEN,

(being A Continuation Of The Work ENTITLED "THE

DOCTRINE OF PARTICULAR PROVIDENCE,")
BY

GEORGE PILKINGTON,

Late Captain, Corps of Royal Engineers.

"O thou of little faith, wherefore didst thou doubt."—Mat. xlv. 31.
"In all thy ways acknowledge him, and he shall direct thy paths."—
Proy. iii. 6.

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PREFACE.

Had I my own will, this prefatory page should not contain more than the three or four lines necessary for a courteous address, such as would satisfy any reasonable reader; but, as I now remember some of the remarks made on "the Doctrine of Particular Providence," of which this may be called the continuation, I find that I have yet to offer some explanation to observations made on that volume, by estimable, yet timid members of the church, who are numbered amongst my friends, as well as some remonstrance with those soi-dissant judges both of writing and motive, amongst the critics.

FriendYou should not publish an account of your own religious experience during your life.

Author—In that case it will never appear, for I am persuaded I shall never publish it after I am dead.

FriendBut those who remained might with more propriety do so.

Author—Who, but myself, could describe the exercise of my mind in trying circumstances?

FriendYou might write it during your life, and leave it as a posthumous work.

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Author—True, but a timid relative might not be inclined to expose what I consider the most valuable part of the work, viz.—the instances of abasement and humiliation, by which I have been brought to a closer walk with God. Besides, it is my conviction that no means of instruction should be withheld from the present generation; we should work "whilst it is called to-day for the night cometh when no man can work:" and the Psalmist seemed to feel this to be a duty incumbent on him, when he said, " come and hear all ye that fear God, and I will declare what he hath done for my soul." Therefore, dear friend, I feel it right, notwithstanding such objections, not only to continue the same system of minutely detailing my religious experience in this work, but, strongly, to recommend the same practice to others. "He that observeth the wind shall not sow, and he that regardeth the clouds shall not reap."

CriticThe author is fanatical,he was once an Irvingite.

Author—I never said that I was. Such an assertion could only emanate from the careless reader, or negligent critic. I stated that I attended the prayer meetings of that sect at half-past 6 o'clock every morning for three months, previous to the Sabbath on which their unscriptural vociferations were heard.

CriticBut you believed in their doctrine?

Author—I never did. I once believed that those who spoke in tongues, (which is but a small portion of their novel doctrines,) were not deluded, until I proved it to be otherwise. I dared not suppose that highly re

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