Asiatic Journal, Volume 14

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Parbury, Allen, and Company, 1822
 

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Página 583 - Then came sudden alarms, hurryings to and fro, trepidations of innumerable fugitives — I knew not whether from the good cause or the bad, darkness and lights, tempest and human faces, and at last, with the sense that all was lost, female forms, and the features that were worth all the world to me, and but a moment allowed — and clasped hands, and heart-breaking partings, and then — everlasting farewells!
Página 583 - ... me with matter for my dreams. Often I used to see, after painting upon the blank darkness, a sort of rehearsal whilst waking, a crowd of ladies, and perhaps a festival, and dances. And I heard it said, or I said to myself, " These are English ladies from the unhappy times of Charles I. These are the wives and...
Página 580 - Then it was, at this crisis of my fate, that my poor orphan companion, who had herself met with little but injuries in this world, stretched out a saving hand to me.
Página 583 - ... daughters of those who met in peace, and sat at the same tables, and were allied by marriage or by blood; and yet, after a certain day in August, 1642, never smiled upon each other again, nor met but in the field of battle; and at Marston Moor, at Newbury, or at Naseby, cut asunder all ties of love by the cruel sabre, and washed away in blood the memory of ancient friendship.
Página 144 - I have had the honour to receive and to lay before the Court of Directors of the East India Company your letter dated...
Página 583 - ... issue. I, as is usual in dreams (where, of necessity, we make ourselves central to every movement), had the power, and yet, had not the power to decide it. I had the power, if I could raise myself, to will it; and yet again had not the power; for the weight of twenty Atlantics was upon me, or the oppression of inexpiable guilt. 'Deeper than ever plummet sounded,
Página 582 - Romanus; especially when the consul is introduced in his military character. I mean to say, that the words king — sultan — regent, &c. or any other titles of those who embody in their own persons the collective majesty of a great people, had less power over my reverential feelings.
Página 350 - Even he that hath clean hands, and a pure heart : and that hath not lift up his mind unto vanity, nor sworn to deceive his neighbour.
Página 236 - For a' that, and a* that: His riband, star, and a' that, The man of independent mind, He looks and laughs at a' that. A prince can make a belted knight, A marquis, duke, and a' that; But an honest man's aboon his might, Guid faith, he maunna fa' that! For a
Página 580 - To this agitation the deep peace of the morning presented an affecting contrast, and in some degree a medicine. The silence was more profound than that of midnight, and to me the silence of a summer morning is more touching than all other silence, because, the light being broad and strong, as that of noonday at other seasons of the year, it seems to differ from perfect day chiefly because man is not yet abroad; and thus, the peace of nature and of the innocent creatures of God seems to be secure...

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