Conversations on the Animal Economy: Designed for the Instruction of Youth and the Perusal of General Readers

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Shirley and Hyde, 1829 - 242 páginas

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Página 230 - fore the king, The throne he sits on, nor the tide of pomp That beats upon the high shore of this world No, not all these, thrice-gorgeous ceremony, Not all these, laid in bed majestical, Can sleep so soundly as the wretched slave Who with a body fill'd and vacant mind Gets him to rest, cramm'd with distressful bread...
Página 2 - States entitled an act for the encouragement of learning hy securing the copies of maps, charts and books to the author., and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned, and also to an act entitled an act supplementary to an act, entitled an act for the encouragement of learning by securing the copies of maps, charts and books to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving and...
Página 2 - LEA, of the said district, have deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof they claim as authors in the words following', to wit: " Logan, A Family History. Hear me, for /will speak. Brutus.
Página 165 - ... the room he was in, he said, he knew to be but part of the house, yet he could not conceive that the whole house could look bigger.
Página 164 - He knew not the shape of any thing, nor any one thing from another, however different in shape, or magnitude, but upon being told what things were, whose form he before knew from feeling...
Página 230 - Tis not the balm, the sceptre, and the ball, The sword, the mace, the crown imperial, The intertissued robe of gold and pearl, The farced title running 'fore the King, The throne he sits on, nor the tide of pomp, That beats upon the high shore of this world, No, not all these, thrice-gorgeous Ceremony,— Not all these, laid in bed majestical, Can sleep so soundly as the wretched slave...
Página 164 - One particular only (though it may appear trifling) I will relate. Having often forgot which was the cat, and which the dog, he was ashamed to ask ; but catching the cat (which he knew by feeling) he was observed to look at her steadfastly, and then setting her down, said, so puss ! I shall know you another time.
Página 165 - ... about two months after he was couched, he discovered, at once, they represented solid bodies ; when to that time he considered them only as party-coloured planes, or surfaces diversified with variety of paint ; but even then he was no less surprised, expecting the pictures would feel like the things they represented, and was amazed when he found those parts, which by their light and shadow appeared now round and uneven, felt only flat like the rest ; and asked which was the lying sense, feeling,...
Página 164 - When he first saw, he was so far from making any judgment about distances, that he thought all objects whatever touched his eyes, as he expressed it, as what he felt did his skin; and thought no objects so agreeable as those which were smooth and regular, though he could form no judgment of their shape, or guess what it was in any object that was pleasing...
Página 50 - Hunter's pithy remark is quoted, "some physiologists will have it, that the stomach is a mill, others, that it is a fermenting vat, others, again, that it is a stew-pan; but, in my view of the matter, it is neither a mill, a fermenting vat nor a stew-pan ; but a stomach, gentlemen, a stomach.

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