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quite petrified us; “ you can do the like, presented it to the domestic, I was at if you choose to take the trouble.” once ushered into a handsome apartment,

The general took advantage of the adorned with several very good engrapermission with the haste and fervour of vings, among which was a portrait of a soldier's devotion. We carried off a Tieck himself. His daughter, a young considerable quantity of this precious lady of rather pleasing demeanour, relic; and valuable, indeed, it was, if the received me very politely, and told me preciousness of a relic is to be estimated that her father would be occupied for by the feelings its contemplation excites. a few moments, but that I should see Two or three months afterwards these him almost immediately. Whether or two pieces of furniture had followed not this was the fair personage whom their other parts all over the continent, the splenetic Müllner so grossly attacked, to the great despair of the English I know not; but if so, and should it be tourists and curiosity hunters.

allowable in such a case to judge physiA fortnight after our expedition to ognomically, her appearance certainly the house in Ajaccio, the sloop bent its affords presumptive evidence of the little course to the island of Elba, and sailing fellow's utter want of conscientiousness. along the shores of Rio Longone, glitter- A pair of stiff-starched fräulein, the ing with iron rocks, we anchored in very beau ideal of stale aristocratical front of the city of Porto-Ferrajo, which virginity, occupied a sofa on one side seems ready to be crushed by the weight of the room; while I seated myself opof the superincumbent mountains. The posite to them, on the other.

The conElbese boats, with their cargoes of vege- versation, which, on the part of the tables for Leghorn and Plombino, and the ladies, was conducted in terms of the fishing smacks, filled with therich supplies coldest politeness, was fortunately soon of that part of the Mediterranean, saluted, cut short by the appearance of the poet as they passed, the French flag, which himself, who, on entering the apartment, had now become their own. The cap- saluted me kindly, and took a seat by tain lowered his boat, and in five min- my side. utes, we 'trod the soil of the island of Tieck, if I may judge from appearElba, the first gaol of the illustrious pri- ances, must be on the wrong side of fifty. soner of Europe. What an immense In face as well as person he exhibits all distance-what a deep gulf there is be- the usual indications of that stage of life, tween the house in Ajaccio, and this in and he does not seem to be at all in good Porto Ferrajo, which, to common eyes, health. His countenance is open,

and seem to be in so close a juxta position ! his large forehead bespeaks a mind Brienne, Toulon, the Pyramids, Aus- fraught with thought and intelligence. terlitz, the Tuileries, the Kremlin of There is an unaffected nobleness in his Moscow, Fontainbleau, and the island speech and demeanour, which is as imof Elba—what a starting-point--what pressive as it is pleasing ; while the style resting-places—wbat a sad termination! of his conversation, at every turn, indiFrom the house in Ajaccio, Buonaparte cates the poet-mind, rich in imaginative rushed forth to conquer the throne of conceptions, and soaring from earthly France, and to subjugate Europe; from to ethereal things. My remarks upon the house in Porto-Ferrajo, Napoleon his works naturally led him to inquire escaped to be conquered at Waterloo, how they were appreciated in England; and to die at Longwood !

a question which, I confess, I could not

well answer. I told him, however, that GERMAN LITERATURE, I had seen translations of several of his

romances, and also of his Marchen ; and

by way of fillip to his self-love as an Yesterday afternoon, I took an oppor- author, I hinted that his two tales, entunity of calling on the Hofrath, Lud- titled “The Betrothed' and 'The Picwig Tieck, who, next to Goethe, is the tures,' had won him some celebrity most renowned litterateur in Germany. among English novel-readers. He put Having learned that he lived in the Neu- many questions to me respecting Sir markt, proceeded thither; and on as- Walter Scott and his works, with all of cending the stair of one of the corner which he appeared to be peculiarly conhouses of the square, soon found myself versant; and it struck me, that he enwithin the poet's habitation. I had tertained the pleasing conviction, that taken the precaution of sending my card his own fame, like Sir Walter's, rested of introduction, an hour or two before much on the acquaintanceship, displayed claiming an audience; and when I again in his writings, with the manners and

feelings of the past.

TIECK.

GRILLPARZER.

On Tieck's alluding to Shakspeare, I science, literature, politics, and religion. took occasion to thank him for the plea. One of the censors, of course, immedisure I had received from the perusal of ately sits in judgment on the various his able preface to the works of the un- passages of the work. This functionary fortunate Lenz, which he published having made his remarks upon the mar. about three years ago. Poor Lenz, you gin, it is next submitted to another know, was the first in Germany who officer to consider these remarks. If the advocated the poetical and dramatic cha- work be political, it is then sent to the racter of Shakspeare, in opposition to Chancery-office; and if religious, to the that of Raeine; and may justly be said Consistorial-office. On being sent back to have fallen a victim to the enthusiastic from either, it is then returned to the attempt which he made to reform the office of Police, where it is again revised, drama of his native land.

and the passages that are permitted to be During my interview with Tieck, the printed, and those to be condemned, are ladies seemed to listen to him as an ora- finally fixed upon; when, to crown the cle; and it was not without reason. His whole ordeal, it is necessary that either conversation is even superior to his wri- the Graff Von Sedlmitzky or the Hofrath tings. I could not help being gratified Von Ohms, the two individuals at the with the manner in which he spoke of head of the censorship, append their his literary contemporaries, and even of permissive seal of imprimatur. those who were his declared foes. Aware of his being one of that celebrated critical clique, of which Schlegel and Novalis Yesterday, when passing through St. were confederates, and whose admiration Stephen's Platz, he was pointed out to of Catholic mysticism Tieck had abetted me, and you cannot imagine how happy and advocated, I took care to avoid the I was at the circumstance. I assure you dangerous whirlpool of polemics. His I had all the wish in the world to run religious prejudices, like those of Dr. up and salute him, and to tell him how Johnson, are incurable. They are dis- much 1 had been pleased with the repreplayed in an obvious hostility to the sentation of his “ Ahnfrau,” in the Prusspirit of Protestantism, and may be said sian capital; but just as I was about to to be constitutional. This is, perhaps, follow and accost him, a friend stepped the only blot in his character.

forward, and hurried him through a Among other particulars, I learned large gateway. I had time enough from Tieck that there are five periodicals allowed, however, “to take a slight map' at present published in the Saxon capital, of him, as a friend of mine used jocuviz., the Merkur, published six times a larly to say; and here it is :- Imagine, week, being a selection of short literary then, a pale, attenuated countenance enpapers, consisting of tales, poetry, anec- circled with dark hair ; the features dotes, &c. ; 2d, Der Sachsiche Stadt- strongly marked ; particularly the eye, verordnete und Communalgardist, another which, in spite of a pair of spectacles, literary paper, published weekly ;' 3d, seems to sparkle with intelligence; and Anzeiger Dresdener, an advertising paper, a finely formed mouth, which, whether published daily; 4th, Tageblatt von Ar- it were reality or imagination, I fancied nold, another collection of tales, criti- bespoke the romantic sensibility that cisms, &c.; and, 5th, Denkwurdigkeiten characterizes the fine feeling of his own fur Sachsen, which appears four times a creation, Bertha. Next, suppose this week, and gives an account of passing bead placed on a pair of high shoulders, events, extracted chiefly from foreign surmounting a tall spare figure, and you prints, together with original papers. will be able

to form some notion of the The whole of these publications, how- full-length portraiture of Franz Grillever, are rather of a tea-table sort, and, parzer. The author of the "Ahnfrau' according to Tieck's account, have very is, I am told, about forty-one years of few pretensions either to learning or age, and his appearance does not belie it. philosophy.

As I gazed upon him, I could not help

regretting, that the fine sarcastic spirit I am told (says Mr. Strang) that no which breathes in every line of the poework whatever can be put to press, until tical diatribe that he wrote amid the ruins it has actually undergone the revision of of Rome, should have been repressed or three distinct officers. For example, extinguished by the various deadening the manuscript is sent first to the office influences which must have encompassed of Police, where there are censors ap- him since his return from the Eternal pointed for every department of art, to the Imperial City.

CENSORSHIP IN AUSTRIA.

“ Prime

THE ALLQEMEINE ZEITUNG.

editorial chamber, there were four perHaving got the regular sights over, I sons busily employed in translating the hurried to pay my respects to Mr. Stey- English and French newspapers. Of mann, the editor of the well-known the English journals, the * Times' and journal, entitled the Allgemeine Zeitung, the Courier' were those that seemed to one of the ablest_and most judicious be the most patronised and esteemed by political organs in Europe. This news-, the editor. The Allgemeine Zeitung, paper was originally printed in Ulm, but as you may well suppose, has a very exwas removed from thật. town to Augsa tensive circulation. It is published burgh in 1810.

When I entered the daily, and is printed by a steam-press. editorial sanctum, Mr. Stegmann was The establishment, altogether, is on a busy writing ; but on stating the object, large scale, and I believe is generally of my visit-which I said was to satisfy considered one of the first in Germany. a wish I had long entertained, to meet an ir:dividual whose extensive views and

MILITARY ENTHUSIASM. varied kpowledge had raised the news. Immediately before the 42nd disempaper he conducted, to the rank of the barked in Egypt in 1801, under the leading journal of Germany--he imme. command of General Abercrombie, orders diately laid aside his pen, and was all were given not to fix their bayonets, nor attention. He is a man, as I should to load their muskets, till they were all suppose, about sixty ; but still hale and on shore, although the enemy's shot was active. His countenance is a good falling in and round the boats like hail. index to his character, as illustrated in On landing, Major Stirling gave the the management of his - paper. It be- word, “ Fix bayonets.". In a moment speaks shrewdness and caution, as well as every bayonet was fast to its musket. quick perception and decision, which you The major next followed with will allow, are, of all other qualifications, and load;" but the words had scarcely the most important for a political writer. escaped his lips, when an individual in Mr. Stegmann is the son of a most re- the ranks vociferated, “No prime and spectable but unfortunate man, and was load, but charge bayonets and that immeat a very early age left to shift for him- diately!" The entire regiment, as one self. After many vicissitudes, and pass- man, instantly ascended the heights at ing through various situations, he became the charge, and carried the French posieditor of the Allgemeine Zeitung, as far tion with cold steel in the most gallant back as the year 1804 ; and sinc that style. On inquiry it was found that the period, he has laboured most industri- person who had assumed the command, ously to sustain its high character. You was no other than Donald Black, a priare perhaps aware that this is the only vate soldier and an old smuggler from political journal of Germany, which is the island of Skye. General Moore allowed freely to circulate in Austria reprimanded the regiment for not obey. and its dependencies; but the reason for ing the commanding officer, and spoke so gracious a toleration, which I am to Colonel Dickson rather severely of about to explain, will no doubt be new the irregularity of his men. Colonel

Since my arrival here, I have Dickson replied, “I might have held one heard it repeatedly asserted, that the man, but, by Heavens, general, it was edition for Germany is often very differ- impossible for me to hold a whole regient from that which is circulated in ment." But Donald Black's (in Gaelic Austria; in other words, that while in Dhu), Highland blood was in a flame, the former there are frequently articles and being indignant at what he thought of the most liberal description admitted, unnecessary loss of time, his impatience it universally happens, that from the lat- to close upon the foe in the Scottish ter these are carefully excluded, and manner, made him lose sight entirely of their place supplied by a quantity of the humble station which he occupied in Balaam. I threw out some hints on this the corps. As Shakspeare says,

" all subject to Mr. Stegmann, but he had is well that ends well;" but, had this too much tact and prudence to make any furious charge failed, it would have been confession. * * It may be said to be the a black day for poor Donald. mirror of the policy of the great Nor- Unpublished Notes of a General Officer. thern Powers, and it is well understood to be the medium through which Prince Great men even in distress are not Metternich not unfrequently pours forth viewed but through the shades of preju. his political sophistry, to charm the con- dice, as the sun in eclipse cannot be servatives of the Continent.

In the gazed on, save through glasses darkened.

to you.

LONDON: Published by Effingham Wilson, Junior, 16, King William Street, London Bridge, Where communications for the Editor (post paid) will be received.

(Printed by Manning and Smithson, Ivy Lane.)

OF FICTION, POETRY, HISTORY, AND GENERAL LITERATURE.

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THE SHEIK'S REVENGE. The light breeze sighed gently, AN EASTERN TALE.

through the bowers of the gardens, and (For the Parterre.)

as the wind bent the foliage it displayed

the fairy scenery; built on a small The palace of Kishen Kower, Sheik, of island, rising from the brink of the clear Istamboul, was one of the loveliest spots sheet of water, with its white marble in Asia Minor. Overlooking the most domes and turrets, it looked at first like enchanting gardens in the world, where some magic city-around were smiling green bowers impervious to the heat of vistas of acacia, amarynih, and delicious the noontide sun, preserved fresh and musk rose, long avenues of citron, bright unwithered the bloom of flowers the golden orange, and drooping vine : fairest that ever perfumed the eastern having passed the portico, was a beauair, rose the Zenaud, or summer resi- tiful colonnade, the pillars of which dence of the powerful chief, and sur- were jasper, enriched with pale amethyst; rounded as it was, on all sides, by the at the end of its long corridor, rose, like lofty range of mountains extending to a majestic swan from its liquid element, the sea, which raised high the peaks of the light dome, raised high into the their topmost hills, as if proud of the bright sky above, its fantastic cupolas place they cherished, seemed as 't were glittering in all the gorgeous architeca fair and dazzling gem, set in a rough ture of the east; a carved trellis or casket ; the sides of the hills were robed lattice work of ivory, ran round the hall, with waving forests, of the deepest and through its interstices the bright brown, in the thickets and recesses of perfumed creepers were suffered which, the sprightly antelope skipped entwine ;-here grew in a manner un. along, and the bright-eyed gazelle made known to Europeans, the cleander and its hed; in the shady groves beyond clematis, flinging, from end to end, their those hills was another, and loftier silvery buds, and wooing to their thick range, gradually lessening till the shade cover, the humming birds, the plumage of blue was at last so faint as to be lost of which, when glistening in the sunin the convexity of the heavenly vault.

114

to was

a

shine, is too dazzling for the eye to a Sheik's daughter. All of love that rebehold; and the lilac doves, with their mained in the father's breast, unsubdued mournful notes, were a solemn accom- by the ruthless acts he daily executed, paniment to the soul-entrancing bulbul. was lavished on that fair girl ; she it was The floor of this fairy dwelling was who fed the remaining spark, and kept paved in Mosaic work, spreading like a alive the flickering fire of humanity; and richly variegated carpet to the gilded many a released captive, and pardoned pedestals of twenty pillars of yellow slave, blest from his heart the beauteous marble, supporting the dome; their Leila. She, in return, loved her parent capitals were silver, beaten into lotus with all the tender affection of a heart flowers, and as they wound into each formed to love him and her brother, for other, formed a wreath of foliage round she knew none else ; her antelope, gazelle, the dome; eighty marble steps led to she loved, for they loved her, and were the garden beneath, from the peculiar her chief companions. lulling sound of the ever falling waters, It is night, but such a delicious, quiet, called the “ Abode of Sleep.”.

bright one, that 't would seem as if the The Sheik's family consisted of him. sun had not yet hid his beams, but still self, as numerous a retinue of wives as lingered behind the shade of some was consistent with the dignity of his envious cloud : had not the young moon title, a son and daughter. He was a man shone forth, the etherial beauty of her past the prime of life, and habituated to

crescent brow, too manifest to be mis. command; his demeanour, though calm, taken, light and shade were so blended

stern and decisive; he was as to resemble the day of northern climes; warrior used to fields of strife—at peace the tremulous and silvery beams melt when let alone, but one who in his on the domes and pinnacles, and the anger was a lion,

At the sound of his flowers relieved from the oppressive heat saukh* two hundred warriors were at his of the day, wear other beauty-lay aside command, and the neighbouring chiefs their gorgeous tints, and look all pale came to the decision, that the lord of and lovely. Leila, the fair mistress of the Istamboul was a far safer friend than scene, looks o'er the fair expanse of foe; he therefore was considered as the waters trembling in the moonshine, till chief of the entire province, and he who the voice of her brother claims her attendare murmur against one who was so

tion. universally reverenced, soon had reason “ Ha! Hassan,” she playfully said, to repent of his temerity.

“ are you come to watch the shining Yet o'er his rough mind, the influence

moon light up the glossy surface of the of the mild climate was not unfelt; he lake, while the breeze wafts the sweetest felt gratified that his abode stood un- perfume, and the air re-echoes to the rivalled; at times he was

bulbul's song?" A lover of music, and of scenes sublime. “ No, dear Leila ; but to bid you A pleasure in the gentle stream that flowed Past him in crystal, and a joy in flowers,

farewell.” Bedewed his spirit in their calmer hours.

“ Farewell! Hassan,” she quickly ut.

Byron. tered, as the colour left her cheek, and The son was much the counterpart of her words faltered at the idea of this the sire, taking into account the differ their first separation, “what mean you?" ence of years; the excitements of the

I go to-morrow to the war of Iran." chase, and shooting parties, were all that

“ Allah preserve my brother ! Goes interested him: 't is true he would listen

our father with you ?" inquired Leila. to Leila's song, when reclining on a “ No; I depart alone.” couch, tired after the fatigue of the day,

That night was one of sorrow to Leila; but not one tender sentiment it contain- it was the first time she had ever known ed, found its way into his bosom. What- anything like sorrow,-her only brother, ever was of tenderness reposed in the the playmate of her infancy, the comdaughter; her fair brow. was finely con- panion of her childhood, was about to be trasted with her dark hair, which fell taken from her,--she did not know when in long, luxuriant tresses o'er her grace- he would return, if ever,—the heart of ful neck; her fairy feet, entwined in Leila was troubled. gems, flashed when she moved; the flush

Hassan was too much taken up to atof innocence spread its crimson bloom tend to her, if he had been so inclined ; over her cheeks, and gave life and ex. he ransacked the "Sillah-Khauch for pression to her lovely countenance

swords and javelins; frightened the inher hazel eyes beamed from beneath habitants of the + Rawula, by sounding a their pencilled brows, with the pride of blast of the large ftourraye, and detained • War-shell.

• Armoury. + Harem. Trumpet.

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