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one by which it had been succeeded, and sale of a few small trinkels. She would have confounded the vision with the too bring her part to the little treasure reality; but he could not arrive at such a derived from labour, which they would conclusion; on the contrary, the more he be sure of amassing whilst leading an awakened himself, the more clearly he obscure and happy life. She rejoiced in identified the formidable apparition, and its very anticipation. then he further felt the incontestable ef- During all this time what was Eloi fects of it, those he had so distinctly seen in doing? Whilst Alienor created for herhis sleep. At last, well convinced of the self such smiling pictures of a future position in which he found himself, he which should be all in all to her, there began to consider how he might make was he under the porch of the church the best of the bargain so rashly struck, Saint Paul, waiting for the nun, not and a sudden and delirious thought, certainly in a state of calm beatitude, a thought emanating from the left side but a prey to all the anguish of an inof his brain and heart,-of the nun, tolerable agitation. He loved Alienor, that thought appeared to him irresistible with a calm, but yet a deep and far He arose to obey it, when Alienor gaily reaching affection. His passion for the entered the saloon and ran to throw her- nun was violent, sudden, but indestructself into his arms.

tible; he felt it so more especially since “ Already risen, so soon up, Eloi? I the scene of the preceding night. The thought to have found thee still a sleeper, attraction of the one was of a gentle and thou art not so matinal ordinarily. winning character of the other, wild Gracious heavens! how your cheek and maddening. It was, morally, the burns, the left cheek only—and thine punishment of being drawn and quartered, heart beats again mine. at a rate that a terrible manifestation of the hidden troubles me sorely. Thou hast a fever! tortures of a man undecided and irresoThine hand?—thy pulse is calm, how- lute in the great circumstances of life.

And now the other? what dread- And what state of irresolution could be ful disorder is here! Let us summon more complete than that of Eloi? Brain, Maître Coictier. Oh! my Eloi !" heart, all of sensation, thought, mind,

While she was thus lavishing upon intelligence, divided in halves, an exact him the tenderest caresses and the most moiety! Two opposing principles, pos. lively expressions of solicitude, he sessing equal powers; two armies in presought to withdraw himself from her sence of one another, of the same embrace; and at length thrust her aside strength! What a strife! What a field without making any reply, and quitted of battle! How vital was the struggle. the house. One may imagine the depth He thus accurately figured to himself of her despondency, she, who until that the miserable condition in which he had moment had been in sole possession of placed himself by a terrible vow, as inEloi's love, of all the affection he had stantly heard as expressed, when on a ever been capable of shewing. One sudden he forgot every thing. The nun idea alone, one horrible idea perpetually was near him. presented itself to her--that he had be- " Monseigneur, have you not still come insane.

And then she found her some pretty missal, or golden cross left, own reason leave her at the very thought; to bestow upon me for the love of she examined every corner of the cham. heaven?" ber, peering into every nook and recess, “All, my pretty Agnès, all shall be without having any particular object thine!” replied he, taking her hand. for which she was in search; and after- “Oh! monseigneur ! " and she wards summoned the domestics to over- trembled violently, “ Monseigneur, hold whelm them with interrogations. She me not thus, glare not upon me so learned that Eloi had passed the night in fiercely; your fingers burn me, your the saloon; the two wax tapers wholly looks render me distracted.” consumed attested the fact. And then “ Thine have wrought far greater torshe thought the truth revealed itself to ments within me, gentle Agnès !" her. She doubted no longer that he

• For mercy's sake, fix not your eyes had toiled until day-break to procure so horribly, this one more especially. I some small resources, and had hastened follow thee, I follow thee." forth as soon as morning came, for the And of a verity she did follow him, purpose of disposing of his nocturnal without further thought of the convent, labours. And then her tears flowed the prioress, or her vows; she subafresh awhile, but she dried them soon, dued by some irresistible influence, and and drew forth from her ceinture, two walked behind him like a banded lamb. or three gold carolus, the produce of the

(Concluded at page 37).

COMIC MILITARY SKETCHES. choose the least evil of the two, and

have my precious neck broken rather SECOND DAY'S DRILL.

than be eaten alive.

Riding-master.Certainly, sir; but Riding-master.-Where is Cornet pray decide; we cannot keep the ride Waddle, this morning, Corporal Lash, waiting for these trifling matters, sir. that he is not present with the drill ? Bring in Billy Bounce. Oh, yonder, I see him coming. Good Corporal.—He is here. morning, Cornet Waddle; none the Cornet.-What, that great brute! I worse for your falls, I hope.

shall never reach the summit of his Cornet.—Rather dilapidated, and out back ; bring in a ladder, corporal. of sorts.

Riding-master. - Give him a leg, Riding-master.—What is the matter, Corporal Screw. sir ?

Cornet.--Easy, corporal, what the Cornet.—Why, sir, in the first place, deuce do you think you have got hold of. I have two black eyes, lacerated shins, Riding-master. Well done, Cornet broken nose, scratched face, and hipped Waddle! Don't touch his sides, or he beside ; laughed at by the ladies, quizzed will have you down before you can say by the officers, and jeered at by the sol- 0. Let go the mane, Cornet Waddle, diers. Do you know, sir, that a rascal and heads up. Cornet Shins, what are in the awkward squad had the impudence you laughing at, sir ! No laughing to say to his comrade as I passed, " Bill, while in the ranks, sir. What, hold of smoke his nose; twig his black eyes !” the mane again, Cornet Waddle? Steady, It's what I call a confounded bore. sir ; not even an eye let to move. What

Riding-master.-Poh, poh, sir !- the deuce, Cornet Screw, are you looking these are but trifles to what you may ex- behind you for ? Now, gentlemen, at pect in the army; soldiers are, sir, un- the word march, press the legs smartly taught and unsophisticated beings, and against the horse's sides, keeping them whenever you should have a broken neck well in hand. March ! halt ! Cornet -nose, I meant-make an eschelon Waddle, keep his head up, sir. movement, and get out of the way. Cornet.- I wish somebody would keep Corporal Lash, what nag have you got his heels down. for Cornet Waddle to-day ?

Riding-master. – I wish that horse Corporal.—Billy Bounce.

would leave off kicking. Riding-master. -Oh, the horse that Cornet. So do I, indeed; this is broke Cornet Barrato's neck !

what I call perpetual motion. Corporal. The same, sir.

Riding-master.—Never mind him, Cornet.—Much obliged to you, cor- sir, he will soon get tired of it; faster! poral, for your attention to my welfare, Now, gentlemen, we will try a trot. and shall remember you.

Trot! faster! Bravo, Cornet Thingum. Corporal.-- Thank you, sir. Good bob! Who is that cornet? what is his horse for anything, sir.

name? Cornet. Yes, so I have just heard ; Corporal.-Skinner, sir. leg or neck I suppose is all the same to Riding-master.—Cornet Skinner, bend him?

the small of the back a little ; not that Corporal.--The latter, sir, I believe he way, sir; very well. Gallop ! faster ; excels in.

faster! Now, gentlemen, mind how you Cornet. - I had rather not ride him form up into line. Front form, halt ! for a day or two.

Why, sir, you will have your brains Riding-master.-Oh, certainly not! kicked out; get him round. Bring in Antelope.

Cornet.—I might as well move the Corporal.—What, kicking Antelope, riding-school. sir ?

Riding.master. Put your spurs into Riding-master.—No, Antelope, the his sides, and he will soon move; hold man-eater,

What, off, sir. Cornet.—The man-eater !

Cornet.-It looks mightily like it. Riding-master. -Yes, sir; he has Riding-master. - Never mind, sir ; been so christened from having thrown when I was learning to ride, I did not Cornet Blackwhite, and then, sir, began mind a hundred falls a day. to eat him.

Cornet.—But I am heartily sick of Cornet.—Preposterous, indeed! If, one; besides, I have lost the heel of my sir, I may be permitted to have the boot, and spur, and my shin is very choice of my own death, I would rather much cut.

his head up.

Riding-master.—Never mind, sir; Waddle. — No, sir, it was the fault of plenty in the store.-room ; a dozen falls the horse; you may as well ride the more, sir, will make it neck or nothing limb of a weaver ; he goes from side to whether you ever make a good horseman side, as if by mechanism, and his mouth or not. Come, sir, mount again. Cor- is as hard as a rock. net Shins, if you don't leave off grinning, Riding-master.—Good nag for pracyou shall have a spell upon the same tice. Come, gentlemen, mount once horse.

more, and we will then go home. Steady, Cornet Waddle.-Do, pray, let him, steady! We will now charge. Recol sir; he's always boasting of his riding. lect, Cornet Waddle, forming two deep,

Riding - master. Coporal Screw, you are the right-hand man of the rear mount Cornet Shins on Bouncing Bess, rank, and in your telling off, right by and give Cornet Waddle Runaway Kate. threes. Gallop-front form two deep.

Cornet Waddle.—Thank you, sir. Bless me, Cornet Waddle, do be more

Riding-master. Now, mind, keep attentive! her well in hand. If she once breaks Waddle.- O dear, O dear! from you, you won't stop her. Faster Riding-master. What is the matter, --faster! Canter-steady, gentlemen sir ? - faster-gallop-throw the body well Waddle.—My shin is broken, all the back. Cornet Waddle, keep her in hand buttons are torn off my leathers, one of - faster! Halt—halt! there, I told you my spurs is gone, and I have lost my she would be off with you—let go the cap. mane-halt! Never mind a little blood, Riding-master. The effects of insoldiers often bleed; wipe your face, sir, attention, sir; sheer neglect of instrucand at it again; these are but minor tions; I must really send you back to considerations in the army. If your the goose-step again. Put your horse neck was broken you might be down- round or you will be killed. hearted. Never mind a few scratches. Waddle.— I might as well endeavour If you mind these little penalties, the to move St. Paul's. sooner you countermarch, and make a Riding-master,– What, off again, sir. retrograde movement toward home, the Are you hurt? better. You can now leave the army Waddle.—No, sir, I begin to get into with credit; but if you once embark in a systematic way of falling without hurtthe great field of gigantic war, and mind ing myself; but my head is going round being blown up in the elements, and like a windmill. then falling on pikes and bayonets, you Riding-master.— Repose a little, and will be but a poor fellow.

that will go off. Cornet.-Elements, pikes, bayonets ! Waddle.- What on the ground, sir? Why, what do you mean?

Riding-master. — Yes, sir; many a Riding-master. - Mean, sir ! That better man has reposed on the cold earth, you must not mind a few ups and and some have made the earth their last downs; therefore mount yonder white pillow. Despise not the arid sun nag; you will find him all life, and he thy bed, nor the Ainty rock as thy will cut many capers. I don't know a pillow: it is the soldier's grand and finer horse to learn to ride ; he has universal bed of war. Why, what are killed some few aspirants, but he has you blubbering about, sir. turned out some of the best dragoons in Waddle. - You touched a chord that the service. Waddle, you look for all vibrates a sound in my ear that is most the world like some poor fellow frozen heart-rending. It was my father's last to death ; a leg here, and an arm there. earthly pillow. Turn in your toes, sir. Now, sir, you Riding-master.-Come, sir, no more are a fit subject for an artist-majestic of this. Corporal Screw, we will break and noble; you will do, sir, with a little up for to-day, and begin a new moveattention, and a little more courage.

ment to-morrow. March-trot-gallop! Bravo ! bravo ! -halt.

Waddle.-0 dear, O dear! my head is going round like a whip-top-my eyes Aash fire-I am so giddy!

Some award this interesting distinction to Riding-master.-A gallop is a most the Pantheon, but history pronounces excellent and infallible remedy for giddi- the most perfect ancient edifice to be the

Let go the horse's mane, Cornet temple of Theseus at Athens. It is Shins. What! three of you off at once! nearly two thousand five hundred years Cornet Waddle, that is all your fault. old.

as

THE

MOST

EDIFICE

PERFECT ANCIENT
IN THE WORLD,

ness.

DUELLING.

society and all its members, though the

wealthiest people of the place, were con(For the Parterre.)

sidered so infamous by the really respect

able inhabitants, that he would not be This horrid practice was carried to its held in disesteem for not meeting the greatest possible excess in the reigns of challenger. The lieutenant replied that James the I. and the two Charles's. In he was not afraid of any duellist; be had the reign of the latter Charles, the accepted the challenge, and would meet seconds always fought as well as the his man. They accordingly did meet, principals ; and as they were chosen for and, at the first fire, the lieutenant their skill and adroitness, their combats wounded his antagonist mortally. In were generally the most fatal. Lord great agony and conscience-stricken, he Howard of Carlisle, in this reign, gave invoked the aid of several divines, and a grand fête-champêtre at Spring Gar- calling the duellist society to his beddens, near the village of Charing, the side, lectured them upon the atrocity of Vauxhall of the day. This fête was to their conduct, and begged, as his dying facilitate the intrigue between Lord request, that the society might be broken Howard and the profligate Duchess of up. The death of this ruffian suppressed Shrewsbury; but the gay and insinuating a society which the country did not Sidney flirted with the Duchess, ab- possess sufficient morals or spirit to stracted her attention from Howard, and subdue. ridiculed the fête. The next day his In Virginia, a Mr. Powell, a notorious Lordship sent a challenge to Sidney, who duellist, purposely met and insulted an chose as his second a tall, furious, adroit English traveller, for having said that swordsman, named Dillon. Howard the Virginians were of no use to the selected a young gentleman named Raw. American Union, for that it required lings, just come into possession of an one half of the Virginians to keep the estate of 10,0001. a year. Sidney was other half in order. The newspapers wounded in two or three places, while took it up as a national quarrel, and his second was run through the heart anticipated the meeting, without the and left dead upon the field. The Duke magistracy having the decency, morals, of Shrewsbury became afterwards so or public spirit to interfere. The Enirritated, as to challenge the infamous glishman, therefore, got an - American Buckingham for intriguing with his wife. duellist as his second, went into training The Duchess of Shrewsbury, in the dis- and practice, and met his adversary guise of a young page, attended Buck- amidst a mob of many thousands assemingham to the field, and held his horse bled to witness the result. Mr. Powell whilst he fought and killed her husband. was killed on the spot, and the EnglishThe profligate king, in spite of every man remained unhurt. remonstrance from the queen, received The brother of General Delancey, the the Duke of Buckingham with open late barrack-master general, having high arms, after this brutal murder.

words with a “gentleman,” in a coffeeAbout thirty years ago, there was a house at New York, the American induelling society held in Charlston, South stantly called for pistols, and insisted Carolina, where each “gentleman " took upon fighting in the public coffee-room precedence according to the numbers he across one of the tables. None of the had killed or wounded in duels. The gentlemen present interfered ; - - they president and deputy had killed many. fought across the table, and the AmeriIt happened that an old weather-beaten can, dishonourably firing before his time, lieutenant of the English navy arrived at the Englishman was shot dead upon the Charlston, to see after some property spot. which had devolved upon him in right of In 1763, the secretary of the English a Charlston lady whom he had married; treasury, Mr. Martin, notoriously trained and on going into a coffee-house, en- himself, as a duellist, for the avowed gaged in conversation with a native, purpose of shooting Mr. Wilkes, whom whose insults against England were re- he first insulted in the House of Comsented, and the English lieutenant re- mons, and afterwards wounded in the ceived a challenge. As soon as the affair Park. This gave rise to Churchill's poem was known, some gentlemen waited on of “The Duellist.” The House of the stranger to inform him, that the man Commons ordered his Majesty's sergeantwho had called him out was a professed surgeon, to attend Mr. Wilkes, and Mr. duellist-a dead shot—the president of Martin was considered to have done the the duellist's club. They added that the state some service."

The rev.

the jury.

At that period, duels were frequent the deceased, was seized with fits and amongst clergymen. In 1764, the rev. died in three days. Mr. Hill was killed in a duel by cornet In the famous duel in which Mr. RidGardener, of the carabineers.

dell was killed, and Mr. Cunningham Mr. Bate fought two duels, and was very severely wounded, the challenge subsequently created a baronet, and pre- fell, by mistake, into the hands of Sir ferred to a deanery after he had fought James Riddell, father to Mr. Riddell, another duel. The rev. Mr. Allen killed who had it delivered to him, and did no a Mr. Delaney in a duel, in Hyde-park, more than to provide surgeons for the without incurring any ecclesiastical cen- event. sure; though Judge Buller, on account In 1789, Colonel Lennox conceived of his extremely bad conduct in the himself to have been insulted by the late field, charged his guilt very strongly on Duke of York, who declared before all

the officers on the parade at St. James's, In 1765, occurred the celebrated duel that "he desired to derive no protection between the uncle of the late Lord Byron from his rank of prince.” The colonel and Mr. Chaworth, a notorious duellist. accordingly fought his royal highness They quarrelled at a club dinner, at the it is said with cork bullets; but be that Star and Garter, Pall-Mall, about game. as it may, he contrived to disturb one of Chaworth was a great game preserver, the huge rows of curls it was then and Lord Byron had argued upon the fashionable to wear on the side of the cruelty and impolicy of the game laws. head. They agreed to fight in an adjoining In 1790, Captain Macræ fought and room, by the light of a single candle. killed Sir George Ramsay, for refusing Lord Byron entered first, and, as Cha

to dismiss an old and faithful servant, worth was shutting the door, turning who had insulted Captain Macræ. Sir his head round, he beheld Lord Byron's George urged, that even if the servant sword half undrawn. He immediately were guilty, he had been sufficiently whipped his own weapon out, and, punished by the cruel beating that the making a lunge at his lordship, ran it Captain had given him. As soon as the through his waistcoat, conceiving that servant heard that his master had been his sword had gone through his body. killed on his account, he fell into strong Lord Byron, however, closed, and convulsions, and died in a few hours. shortening his sword, stabbed Mr. Cha- Captain Macræ fled, and was outlawed. worth in the abdomen. The challenge In 1797, Colonel Fitzgerald, a marhad proceeded from Chaworth. Lord ried man, eloped from Windsor with his Byron read his defence in the house of cousin, the daughter of Lord Kingston. peers, and was found guilty of man- Colonel King, the brother, fought slaughter; but upon pleading the privi- Colonel Fitzgerald, in Hyde-park. leges of his peerage, was discharged on They fired six shots each, without effect, paying his fees. He afterwards lead a and the powder being exhausted, Colorecluse and misanthropical kind of life, nel King called his opponent a villain, and is supposed by his habits to have and they resolved to fight again the next afforded his talented nephew many hints day. They were, however, put under in the composition of his “ Lara." The an arrest, when Colonel Fitzgerald had late Lord Byron's attachment to Miss the audacity to follow Lord Kingston's Chaworth, and its result, are considered family to Ireland, to obtain the object to have greatly affected his future morals, of his seduction from her parents. Coloand to have thrown that shade over his nel King hearing of this, repaired to the character, which so deeply tinged his inn at which Colonel Fitzgerald lodged. writings.

He had, however, locked himself in his In Mr. Sheridan's duel with Mr. Ma- room, and refused admission to Colonel thews, on account of Miss Linley, the King, who broke open the door, and parties cut and slashed at each other, running to a case of pistols, seized one a la mode de theatre, until Mr. Mathews and desired Colonel Fitzgerald to take left part of his sword sticking in Sheri- the other. The parties grappled and

were fighting, when Lord Kingston enIn 1772, a Mr. Maclean was chal- tered the room, and perceiving, from lenged and killed by a Mr. Cameron; the position of the parties, that his son and the mother of Mr. Maclean, on must lose his life, unhesitatingly shot hearing of the shocking event, immedi- Fitzgerald dead upon the spot. ately lost her senses, whilst a Miss Mac- In 1803, a very singular duel took leod, who was to have been married to place in Hyde park, between a Lieut.

dan's ear.

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