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have adopted, the reading I delight in (an untutored Yankee) he addressed his most, at present, is history and general observations and questions; many of the politics."

latter were unanswerable, and many Cooke looked up with a sidelong were very kindly answered by himself. glance of peculiar meaning at the face of He appeared to act and speak from the his young friend, and said :

mere impulse of animal spirits, which “If that face and head of yours had rendered action necessary, and called up chanced to have been placed upon a body and combined ideas in such rapid sucthat would have elevated the crown of it cession that immediate and incessant utto the height of six feet, you might have terance by words was the only, although been a statesman of eminence, or a hero inadequate, means of relief. -a leader of senates or of armies-at “Now, captain, that razor will split a least on the stage !”

hair wid as much ase as my hair-triggers This touched a string in my hero's will snuff a rushlight. I bought them composition, which totally changed not of Popham, just by the Parliament-house. alone the current of his ideas, but the Damn the Union, I say; see how it very nature of them.

cuts! Fait and it cuts, sure enough-see Yes, sir,” he replied, “ I have com- the claret—where did you buy dis razor, pared my face with Kemble's; my nose captain ?” is as prominent, my eye is as expressive, “ In Cornhill, Boston.” I have as great power over my features “ London; you mane London.” as he has ; I have studied the profession “ No, sir, Boston, Massachusetts." of an actor as thoroughly as he has but « Boston ! That 's in Canada - I because, according to certain arbitrary know." rules, it is found that my face is too long « In the States." for the height of my person, it is con- “ I know, here in Canada-give me a cluded that I cannot rise to the pitch of towel--they say I must go to Montreal tragic dignity or give due effect to the before I can get to Upper Canada-a poet's pathos."

piece of courtplaster--my regiment is “ Did you ever try?” asked the tra- there—if I go through Boston by the gedian.

way, I will have a pair of dem razors, if “ Yes, once."

it's only to blood myself.”. “ And what effect ?"

The captain, seeing that I was amused “ The fools laughed !"

by his odd companion, winked and “When you intended they should cry! touched his forehead with his finger. I Well, never mind, continue to make smiled in reply. The captain evidently them laugh, and laugh with them-throw thought the Irishman mad. away the stilts-descend from the heights “ There, that's comme il faut," said of Quebec, kick off the buskin, and go Pat, as he tied an enormous cravat and on with your story if you have any more adjusted the ends under his vest. “Don't of it.”

you think so, captain ?” And he slapped So saying, the old man laid his head Jonathan on the shoulder. . on his pillow, good-humouredly laughing, “ You need n't fear the coming of any and composed himself to listen.

foe now,” said the Yankee. Zeb joined in the laugh and pro- “What would you be at, man? Fear! ceeded :

-what's that ? as Murphy said when “ Before I come to the usual winding- he saw his face in a pail of water. Sir, up of a story-marriage-permit me to I'm glad to see a gentleman on board," give you a sketch of a scene on board a accosting me; “no disparagement at all steamboat in ascending the river to to the captain, who is an excellent judge Montreal.”

of razors. You are from England, sir ?" “Anything but heroics."

I bowed an affirmative, adding, “I "On entering the cabin of the boat, have been in England, sir." which was of a size and style perfectly “ And in the army?” magnificent, my attention was attracted “ I have not the honour.” to a man seated before a dressing-glass “ That's a misfortune, sure enough. and preparing to shave himself. He O the army's the sphere for us pretty talked almost without cessation, and fellows! I would have sworn that you with that peculiar manner and brogue came out with the Duke of Richmond.” which belongs to

atleman. I had not that honour.” He had borrowed the shaving-apparatus “ See now, I knew it-captain, who's from the captain, probably to avoid the that? It's Jack Frothingham of the trouble of unpacking his own, and to him thirty-seventh. Tom Blazy !--my coat! 0, I forgot that I left Tom kilt at The captain, after some time, succeed. Liverpool, to come in the next ship !” ed in pacifying the unwilling traveller, and off he dashed to the other end of by stating that he could not touch at the cabin for his coat, and the next mi- Three Rivers on account of the draught nute leaped on shore in pursuit of Jack of his vessel, and as the boatmen had reFrothingham.

raw Irish

fused to return, he was forced to conI now attended to my own affairs; the tinue his way; but that he would take passengers arrived; the boat unmoored him free of cost to Montreal, and return and proceeded up the river, and in the him to Three Rivers when he again contemplation of the picturesque scenery

came down. No sooner had this arrangewhich surrounded me as we passed the ment been proposed, than all the fury of rocks and battlements of the town, and the sufferer vanished-his face became the bold and rugged heights which frown tranquil, his dull, lack-lustre black eye, upon the stream of the St. Lawrence, I motionless, and his whole appearance for a time lost sight of my friend the and deportment sunk into a listless Irish gentleman, nor did anything occur sheepishness. that particularly attracted my attention The Irishman now appeared very busy to him until we arrived at the town of in making inquiries of the Yankee capThree Rivers.

tain, and as they approached me, I Off that place our moving palace heard Jonathan say, “ Chaplain to one stopped, and a boat came from the shore of the provincial regiments.” with some passengers. I had satisfied " Blood and tunder ! ” cried Pat, my curiosity by looking at the town from “what a devil of a clargyman! well, but the deck, and had retired to the cabin. he can cry aloud and spare not,' sure The steamboat recommenced stemming enough. But is he a priest ? Fait, and the current of the St. Lawrence, when he labours in his calling. I tought I suddenly the most hideous yells, mingled had seen some roaring chaplains at home, with curses and blasphemies, were heard but this Yankee preacher bates dem all on the deck. Those in the cabin rushed hollow at a halloo!” out, and we saw a man, in plain, dark “ He is not a Yankee,” said the caphabiliments, with a meagre, sallow coun. tain, “he is a Canadian.” tenance, and lank, black hair, using the · And is it not all one? Sure he is most frantic action, and shouting to some an American. And what sect may he men who were rowing a boat toward the be of ? ” shore; by turns he called upon them to Chaplain to one of his majesty's come back—then on the captain to stop Canadian regiments of militia. By his the steamboat, mixing his entreaties with hearty cursing, I guess he's a church. the most horrible curses as he saw that the boatmen continued their progress to 66 Dat's true! but what has the church the land, and the steamboat bore him to do on the St. Lawrence ?

Where rapidly in the contrary direction. has he gone? O, I see him tossing off

I afterwards found that this person a glass of brandy there at the bar. I had come on board with the intention of must become better acquainted wid a returning in the row-boat, but being out man of his sacred character." of the way at the time when the steam- I lost sight of my men until dinner. boat resumed her course, the boatmen This meal was magnificently served up; either intentionally, or forgetting him, every variety of fish, flesh, and fowl being pushed off and left him on board. Upon displayed in porcelain and plate upon a finding that he was on his way to Mon. table of very great length, at the head treal, travelling from home against his of which sat the captain, and near him will, he seemed suddenly to have changed the military Hibernian, with a bottle of from a mild, placid, low-spoken, modest Madeira at his hand. I had taken my man, to an infuriated, bawling demoniac, seat near the foot of the table and en. and in this situation and character, I, trance of the cabin. We were seated beand the Hibernian, first saw him. The fore the chaplain, so called, entered, and Irishman at first looked on him with with a clownish vacancy of manner, took surprise, and then with an expression of his seat nearly opposite to me. I knew delight; and so thoroughly was be en: not whether the Yankee captain was grossed by the appearance, the screams quizzing the Irishman, or whether the and the mingled oaths and curses of the man in question might not be some unstrange being before him, that he was happy creature who had once been of perfectly silent, for the first time since moderate capacity, but who had degraded he came on board.

himself to the state of stupidity in which

man."

I saw him, by the use of ardent spirits. tion, his excitement, and his recollection He sat perfectly isolated, and appeared of recent circumstances caused to pass to see nothing but the viands on his through the magic-lantern of his imagiplate. I had called my attention from nation. him, as from an object only to be con- “ Montreal_how much money-sixtemplated with pain, when, by chance and-eightpence-it will cost-no-pasa looking up, I saw one of the waiters sage free-hang the boatmen-six-andpresent a bottle of Madeira to him, and eightpence- can't buy Susy the-conheard the Hibernian in a loud, sharp found the oysters--that cursed Irishman voice cry from the head of the table, –0, how sick !” After a variety of “Will your riverence do me the honour sameness in complaining and consoling to take a glass of wine wid me?” himself, and complaining again, the

The Canadian took the bottle, filled Irish officer entered with a candle, and, his glass, looked sheepishly toward the as gay as ever, passed to the farther end challenger with a momentary glance, and of the cabin. swallowed the wine without appearing to Very soon I heard, “ The scoundrel taste it.

cheat me, by putting brandy in my This ceremony was several times re- glass--the Irish scoundrel !” peated, and always with the ludicrous " What 's that you say? Hold your appellation of “riverence” emphasized pace, you blackguard.” All was quiet. with great apparent gravity by the offi- The Irishman appeared to have taken cer; who, as will appear the sequel, possession of his berth, and the light was was determined to indulge his love of extinguished. wine, frolic, and fun, by having a bout “Curse that Irishman! to cheat me! with his “riverence."

the Irish scoundrel ! ” I retired, leaving the revellers to their “ Hold your pace, you blackguard ! sport, which was no longer spurt to me. I've as pretty a pair of hair. triggers here I have often observed, that to a person as ever a gentleman put a finger to, and who does not take his glass as the bottle I have a bit of shillelah to boot; and circulates, those sallies which set the you shall have the one to-night, and the table in a roar, appear very inadequate other in the morning, if I hear a word to the effect produced.

from your ugly mouth." After my first sleep, and, as I supposed, This would quiet the Canadian for a after midnight, I heard two persons time, and then a repetition would take come into the cabin, and immediately place, until the officer appeared to have perceived that one was the chaplain, in fallen asleep. The Canadian's ejaculaa state of loquacious inebriety. His tions now were confined to notes of discompanion repeatedly endeavoured to tress, calls for a light, and for assistance quiet him with, “Hush, hush—the pas- from the steward. At length, I heard sengers are asleep.”

him leave his unquiet place of non-re“ Curse the passengers ! Steward, pose, and as he groped about, he exyou are a good fellow; but that Irishman claimed, “ As dark as Beelzebub_how is a scoundrel ; he put brandy into my shall I get out? Steward ! steward ! glass. I'm not drunk. Let 's go back light! Deuse take the Irishman! I and have some more-hiccup-oysters. wish you were both at the bottom !

“ Hush—no, no-go to bed; this is and as he finished this sentence with a your berth.”

tone of bitterness, he exclaimed in an “Help me off with my coat. Steward, altered tone, “Oh, heavens! how hot you are a good fellow; but curse that it is !” and I immediately knew that he Irishman-s0—that will do. If ever I had come in contact with the stove, and meet that impertinent

perhaps imagined that he felt the heat of “ Hush-there-go to sleep."

the place he wished to consign his torThe steward made his exit. All this mentors to : the heat of the stove, how. passed in the dark.

The chaplain was ever, seemed to cool him, and he soon in a lower berth, near the entrance of after found his way to the deck. I fell the cabin, and not far from the stove, asleep, and heard no more of my men which was kept in operation all night. until next morning, when they met in I lay in an upper berth, some feet farther good fellowship; the young Hibernian from the door.

looked flushed and wilder than ever ; his The chaplain, instead of sleeping, in- reverence, the Canadian chaplain, even dulged himself and amused me, by utter- more stupid and wo-begone. ing aloud the thoughts suggested by the disjoined train of images which his situa.

a A VISIT TO NIAGARA.

NOTES OF A READER. released from the confinement of the

coach, saw myself and companions upon the Table-rock; and soon after we were

submitted to the equipment provided by [We take the following amusing a man resident upon the spot for persons sketch from Mr. Power's Impressions who choose to penetrate beneath the of America." Our readers we suppose great fall, and whose advertisement have not forgotten the “ Tough Yarn assured us that the gratification of cuabout Patygony, fc. fic.” that emanated riosity was unattended with either inconfrom his pen, and will not be disappointed venience or danger, as water-proof in his new work, which abounds with dresses were kept in readiness, together humour and interest].

with an experienced guide. The water

proof dress given to me I found still “I felt interested with Buffalo, and wet through; and, on the arrival of the promised myself much pleasure from a experienced guide, I was not a little survisit to the country occupied by a branch prised to hear the fellow, after a long of the Seneca tribe in its neighbourhood; stare in my face, exclaimbut Niagara was now within a few hours «Och, blur' 'an 'oons! Mr. Power, the great object of the journey was sure it's not yer honour that's come all almost in sight. I was for ever fancying this way from home!' that I heard the sound of the Thunder- “ An explanation took place; when I water' booming on the breeze; so, with found that our guide, who I had seen a restlessness and anxiety not to be sup- some two years before as a helper in the pressed, I got into the coach on the day stable of my hospitable friend Smith after my arrival at the capital of the Barry, at Foaty, was this summer prolakes, and was a short time set down moted to the office of conductor,' as he on the bank of the swift river Niagara, styled himself, under the water-fall. at the ferry, which is some four miles “ And a most whimsical conductor' from Buffalo. From the ferry-house he proved. His cautions, and divil a the eternal mist caused by the great fears!' and 'not a ha’porth a danger! fall may be plainly seen curling like a must have been mighty assuring to the vast body of light smoke, and shooting timid or nervous, if any such ever make occasionally in spiral columns high above this experiment, which although pefectly the tree-tops; but not a sound told of safe, is not a little startling. its immediate neighbourhood.

“ His directions, when we arrived at “ Never let any impatient man set out the point where the mist, pent in beneath for Niagara in one of these coaches; a the overhanging rock, makes it impossirailroad would hardly keep pace with ble to distinguish anything, and where one's eagerness, and here were the rush of the air is so violent as to crawling at the rate of four miles per render respiration for a few seconds hour. I fancied that the last three almost impracticable—were inimitable. miles would never be accomplished; and “Now, yer honour !” he shouted in often wished internally, as I beat the my ear—for we moved in Indian filedevil's tattoo upon the footboard of the "whisper the next gentleman to follow coach-box, that I had bought, or bor- you smart; and for the love o' God! rowed, or stolen a horse at Chippewa, shoulder the rock close, stoop yer heads, and galloped to the wonder alone and and shut fast yer eyes, or you wont be silently,

able to see an inch !' “ At length the hotel came in view, “I repeated my orders verbatim, and I knew that the rapid was close at though the cutting wind made it diffihand.

cult to open one's mouth, “ • Now, sir, look out ! quietly said “ • Now thin, yer honour,' he cried, the driver.

cowering down as he spoke, "do as you “ I almost determined upon shutting see me do; hould yer breath, and scurry my eyes or turning away my head; but after like divils ! I do not think it would have been “ With the last word away he bolted, within the compass of my will so to and was lost to view in an instant. I have governed them; for even at this repeated his instructions however to the distant moment, as I write, I find my next in file, and scurried after. pen move too slow to keep pace with “ This rather difficult point passed, I the recollections of the impatience which came upon my countryman waiting for I seek to record.

us within the edge of the curve de“ A very few minutes after we were scribed by this falling ocean; he grasped

we

>

my wrist firmly as I emerged from the “ This last remark, and the important dense drift, and shouted in my ear, air with which the doubt was conveyed,

“. Luk up, sir, at the green sea that's proved too much for my risible faculties, rowlin' over uz! Murder! but iv it only already suffering some restraint, and I was to take a shlope in on us !'

fairly roared out in concert with my “Here we could see and breathe with companion, who had been for some time perfect ease; and even the ludierous convulsed with laughter. gestures and odd remarks of my poetical “Whoever first instructed the 'concountryman could not wholly rob the duetor' on this point of critical history scene of its striking grandeur.

deserves well of the visitors so long as “I next passed beyond my guide, as the present subject remains here to com. he stood on tiptoe against the rock upon municate the knowledge; indeed, I trust, a ledge of which we trod, and under his before he is drowned in the Niagara, or directions attained that limit beyond burned up with the whiskey required, as which the foot of man never pressed. I he says, 'to keep the could out of the sat for one moment on the Termination shtomach,' the present possessor of this Rock, and then followed my guide back curiosity in literature will bequeath it to my companions, when together we to his successor, so that it may be handonce more ‘scurried into day.

ed down in its integrity to all future “• Isn't it a noble sight intirely? Caps visitors. the world for grandness any way, that's “ Next morning at an early hour, I sartain !'

revisited the · Termination Rock,' I next “I need hardly say that in this opinion wandered down the stream, and had a we all joined loudly; but Mr. Conductor delightful bathe in it. Accompanied by was not yet done with us—he had now a friend, I was pulled in a skiff as close to give us a taste of his larnin'.

to the fall as possible, and, in short, per** I wish ye'd take notice, sir ;' said formed duly all the observances that he, pointing across the river with an air have been suggested and practised by of authority and look of infinite wisdom. curiosity or idleness; but, in all these, Only take a luk at the falls, an' you'll I found no sensation equal to a long, see that Shakspeare is out altogether quiet contemplation of the mass entire, about the description.'

not as viewed from the balconies of the “ • How's that, Pat?' inquired I, hotel, but from some rocky point or although not a little taken aback by the wooded shade, where house and fence authority so gravely quoted by my cri- and man and all his petty doings were tical friend.

shut out, and the eye left calmly to gaze Why, sir, Shakspeare first of all upon the awful scene, and the rapt mind says that there's two falls ; now, ye to raise its thoughts to Him who loosed may see wid yer own eyes that it's one this eternal flood, and guides it harmless river sure, and one fall, only for the as the petty brook.” shtrip o' rock that makes af id.'

“ This I admitted was evident; while Pat gravely went on.

EXCERPTS FROM JEAN PAUL. “Thin agin, only look here, sir; Shakspeare says, " The cloud-cap tower;' why, if he'd ever taken the trouble to luk at it, Man is more exalted than his dwellinghe'd seen better than that; an' if he place; bis look is upward, and the wings wasn't a fool - which I am sure he of his soul are poised for flight, and when wasn't, bein' a grand poet-he'd know the sixty minutes which we call sixty that the clouds never can rise to cap the years, have struck her last, he soars uptower, by reason that it stands above the ward, and kindles as he rises, and the fall, and that the current for ever sets ashes of his earthly covering fall away, down.'

and the purified soul arrives on high, Again I agreed with him, excusing free from the stain of earth and sin—but Shakspeare's discrepancies on the score here, amidst the darkness of life, he only of his never having a proper guide to sees the mountain-tops of the world to explain these matters.

come, glittering in the light of a sun **I don't know who at all showed which never rises upon him ; as the him the place,' gravely responded Pat; dweller at the pole, in the long night 'but it's my belief he never was in id at which no sun illumines, sees a bright all, at all, though the gintleman that toud twilight tinge his distant mountains, and me a heap more about it swears for thinks of the long summer that is comsartin that he was.

ing, when his sun shall never set.

ANTICIPATIONS OF FUTURITY.

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