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of our religion and my councils are alike ber as an accomplice of my flight :impotent; but I have thought of a when one day I received a letter from measure which perhaps will conciliate her. This is a copy of it. Read it both your love, and that which you owe once more to me; for although I have to heaven. At first you will feign the it by heart, I am never tired of hearappearance of indisposition ; you must ing it.” not eat at the refectory ; Madame will She then gave me the following letter summons me to inquire what is the mat- to peruse, which bore her name and adter with you; I will tell her that it is dress. I begged permission of her to nothing more than the want of exercise. keep it, this she granted me, I give it She will give me the key of the park, bere in all its original simplicity. for she always does so when any of the Abbée de Maubuisson, 20 Dec., 1791. sisters are sick. The day upon which My dear sister in Jesus Christ, Louise your cousin has fixed for a rendezvous, Bénédictine, you shall ascend the turret, the door of “ You will assuredly be greatly astonwhich is never fastened; you shall speak ished at receiving a letter from me. I to him through the grating of the little will tell you on some future occasion window; you will tell him that you have how. But wheresoever you may read it, I not yet pronounced your vows, that you pray heaven that it may find you faithful will not pronounce them; but that he to its holy commandments and happy. must address his suit to your father, and “ I have many things to tell you consince Monsieur your cousin is rich, he cerning this convent and its inmates ; will doubtless give his consent to your but as I imagine you are principally. marriage. Doubtless also,' added she, anxious to learn what befel me after your embracing me, you will quit me, but departure, I shall commence with that. happy and without disobedience to hea- “ When Monsieur your cousin lifted

That consideration will at least you down on the other side of the wall, console me.' Such was the plan that I was in an agony of terror; I feared her wisdom of twenty-two imagined, lest you might fall and hurt yourself, and which my love adopted.

for the wall is very high. I called to “ As Rose had ordered me, I feigned you several times but you made me no illness. Madame gave us the key of the reply. Some minutes after, I heard the park; we went there every evening. noise of a carriage driving off. I saw Upon the fatal day you may judge of our too clearly that you were lost to me for inquietude. Rose however had pre- ever, and then I wept bitterly. served some little stock of courage; for “I knew not where I was, or what I myself I was more dead than alive. Ar. was doing. However, the idea occurred rived at the turret, the door, contrary to to me of taking away the ladder, and custom, was shut; but close at hand a notwithstanding it was three times heatall ladder was placed against the wall. vier than myself, I dragged it among We knew not what to do, when suddenly the bushes, near the water. I did so my cousin appeared from the other side that they might not perceive, if they of the wall; he wished to descend; we came, by which way you had made your threw ourselves upon our knees, and escape ; for had they have recovered you, prayed him to refrain from so doing, they would have rendered your life very telling him that all would be lost if he miserable. I then returned to the condid. He complied with our entreaties, vent almost as fast as I could run, by the on condition that I myself should ascend grate of Saint Benoit. I arrived at the the ladder from our side. I tremblingly very moment they were ringing the Anobeyed; but scarcely had I reached him gelus. ere he seized me by the arm, at the same “I at first imagined that the sisters in time his valet de chambre placed himself the infirmary had concluded you had reupon the wall, . and both lifted me over, turned to the cloisters, whilst our sisters dumb with terror, not perhaps unmixed within the cloister believed you were all with another sentiment. Three days the while at the infirmary; for that afterwards we were in Holland, where evening no one seemed to miss you. As he married me.

for myself, you may guess that I was “ This marriage proved a most happy unable to close my eyes the whole night. one. However, amidst the first trans- Whenever I heard the smallest noise in ports of our union, one bitter thought the courtyard or in Madame's apartments alloyed iny otherwise so perfect felicity. I always thought it must be you they What was the fate of Rose, and how were bringing back. dreadful must it be, if they looked upon “But the next morning, Madame

see me.

ordered all the sisters and boarders to this affair to any person whatsoever?' I assemble in the great hall near the re- assured her that I had not, which was fectory. When all of us were there, she the truth. • Very well!' replied she, came in accompanied by the superieure. then I forbid your speaking on the subI commended myself to the care of Hea. ject to any one, whosoever they may be. ven, fully persuaded that my last hour I desire that this affair should remain had arrived.

unknown, for the sake equally of the “ Madame read with her ordinary convent's reputation and the interests of tranquillity the prayer, Veni, sancte religion. The least indiscretion on your Spiritus.' When it was ended, she rose part will draw down my highest anger; up and spoke thus : My sisters, I re- in the meanwhile, I deliver you up to commend to your prayers Mademoiselle that of Heaven.' Louise Bénédictine. Heaven has not " As Madame said nothing more to destined her to our holy vocation. She me then, I thought she had nothing has quitted us. We will offer up in her further to add. I made her my obeibehalf the orison pro peccatoribus.' sance, and was about to retire, when she

“ You will surely conclude that I was recalled me and said-Kneel down;' not one of those who prayed the least and when I had done som - I repeat' conheartily for you. But all present prayed tinued she, that I do not judge it conalso from the very bottom of their souls; venient to punish you for your fault for everybody here loved you, and you before the eyes of mankind as it well might have been very happy with us. merits, but do not hope that it will Heaven has otherwise disposed of you : escape condign punishment.' I replied let its will alone be done.

that I was ready to do whatsoever she There was nothing of fresh occur- should command. · Well,' said she, in rence during eight days. On the ninth, order that I may punish you without its it was a Tuesday, Madame requested to being known to be on account of Made

As she loved me passably well moiselle Louise Bénédictine, I order you and often sent for me, I hoped that it on the Saturday of every week to commit was not on your account; but as soon some fault contrary to the convent rules, as I entered her apartment, all hope that I may be furnished with a pretext. forsook me. She was seated in her Your penitence will be, to go down into great arm-chair, and gazed at me with the correction from the end of matins those piercing black eyes which used to until the commencement of mass, which terrify you so much. I trembled all you must hear kneeling beneath the over like a leaf, and was as pale as my lamp. Now arise, and you may withveil. Seeing which, she said to me- draw.' • You seem to be greatly terrified, Made- • You see, my dear Louise Bénédicmoiselle.' At that word Mademoiselle tine, that Madame has still been very I trembled more then ever. • Yes,' con- good, for she might have written to our tinued she, “ Mademoiselle, for you cer- holy father, who would have sentenced tainly do not expect that I can call such me to die, instead of going once a week an atheist as you my sister.' I repeat down into the correction. I must tell that horrible word to you for my own you frankly that the first time they put humiliation and as a penance for my sins. me into that horrible prison, 'I had a I cannot describe to you the effect it had mortal terror and wept the whole time. upon me; I was in a most wretched I have now got accustomed to it by destate of mind. I need hardly tell you grees; and I pray whilst there to Heaven how ill I merited that epithet.

and to the Holy Virgin to protect you. “ My limbs would scarce sustain me, If you are happy with Monsieur your I trembled so violently, and I staggered cousin, who undoubtedly is your husthe sisters at last began to ask me where- no one will ever be to me like my dear fore I always slept on Saturdays and sister Louise Bénédictine. never on the other days of the week. “ Adieu, receive the prayers and blessNow, upon that day I either leave my ings of your sister, who truly loves you. chamber in disorder or burst out into

her praying - desk for support. band, for you are too prudent not to have • Touch not my prie-dieu,' exclaimed she. been married to him, I do not in the least And then she added :

regret suffering a little to insure your much fear when you aided Mademoiselle happiness. Our Saviour has suffered far Louise Bénédictine to make her escape?' greater agony for us. And as I made no reply_ But answer “ That which causes me more pain me then ! she cried in a terrible voice. than going into the correction, is comI was just on the point losing my mitting the fault every Saturday which senses; which being perceived by her, Madame has ordered me to do. I do she immediately assumed a kinder man. assure you that it causes me much emner-Listen to me, and answer truly barrassment. When I first began I made my interrogations. Have you spoken of pretence of falling asleep at matins, but

near

Had you as

Rose de la Miséricorde. laughter during the collation. I did “N. B. Above all things do not write not imagine it was so difficult to do evil, or endeavour to see me, for then I should and I pity the wicked who continually be lost.” practise it. Two months ago I had for- The lady rejoined :_“In that letter gotten that it was Saturday, and I com- the mind of my poor Rose fully displays mitted no fault. Madame sent for me, itself to you; a touching assemblage of she was exceedingly angry, and sent me sincere devotion and lively friendship. into the correction as usual, and after she told me some few of her troubles, mass I returned there until vespers, which yet made as light of them as possible for I heard kneeling under the lamp, as well ihe sake of my feelings; at the same as Complies and Magnificat. But on time she concealed the most poignant. account of my health, as it made me Ah! it was not in that hateful dungeon very ill to remain so long upon my where she must have suffered most, but knees, she has permitted me to hear in the cloister, during the hours of the them in my place.

promenade, at class, in fine she suffered “ I perceive that I have used all my incessantly. You have no conception, sheet of paper in speaking of myself, and Monsieur, of the malignity existing I shall never have the opportunity of among some forty idle nuns, who have sending another. I could wish however but a very narrow circle wherein to to tell you many things concerning the exercise it: I myself know full well how sisters and the convent. You would many scornful expressions inust have not know it again were you to return; wounded her ear, how many injurious it would appear very dull to what it was suspicions have saddened that noble and when you were here. Father Brantome, sensitive heart. who was so good, has left for a foreign “ The revolution however advanced country; father Cheuneviere alone re- with hasty strides, France was open to mains, of whom I would not wish to say all those whom political or religious any thing disrespectful. The greater matters had banished from it. My huspart of our boarders have also left us. band might have returned thither much Another of them, Mademoiselle Marie sooner than he did, but affairs of imde Saulieu, will also take her departure portance detained him at the Hague.

When I discovered that We did not return before the autumn she was distantly related to you, I became of 1791. very intimate with her. She it is who “ We were at Valenciennes in the be. has promised me to take charge of this ginning of October, when I read in the letter, to and out where you are, and public papers a decree of the Assembly forward it to you. But there is one which immediately suppressed several thing I must not forget to mention, which religious houses. The Abbey of Mau. would cause you as much pain as it does buisson was among the number.

It is to see how greatly, even daily, “I hastened my departure several people relax in religion. Madame, and days; I was impatient to see once more Madame the Superieure go almost every my dear Rose, and offer her in that day to Paris. They say it is on account world in which she was about to find of the convents that they are anxious to herself alone, the succour of a friendship suppress; but convents must always be she had so dearly purchased. I arrived necessary for the preservation of religion, at Paris the 12th of October; on the and the king would not desire that ours 13th I was at Maubuisson. should be suppressed, which was founded “I will not dwell upon the painful by the mother of his saintly ancestor. feelings I experienced on beholding the As for myself, I cannot imagine other- gates of that cloistered retreat, closed wise than that I shall end my days in it. during so many centuries, thrown open Every evening I ask this grace from 10 all who chose to enter; the chapel my good guardian angel, and I have a devastated, its tombs violated, their bones secret presentiment that it will be granted profaned. Alas! a still sadder spectacle

I think, by the way, that they will awaited me. send some other sisters of our order to “As I inquired of every person I met us, because they say we are too rich. what had become of the nuns, the reply They may send as many as they please, to each question was, that the portress

to..morrow.

me.

me.

J. S. M.

THE SUPPOSED MURDERER OF THE PRINCES

IN THE TOWER.

could alone in form me. She occupied edly we promised one another to bear a the apartment of the late abbess, and mutual share of the pains and pleasures thither I ran with all speed.

of our whole lives : unequal partition, in “This woman recognized me imme- which the fault and what the world calls diately.

happiness was mine, her's innocence and “•What has become,' said I, of sister a most horrible punishment!". Rose de la Misérecorde?'

The lady had just finished these words On uttering the name she grew pale, when her carriage was announced. After trembled, lighted a taper, and sought for she had stepped into it: “Monsieur," her keys.

said she to me, “I am sure that I need 66. In the name of Heaven,' I repeated, not request your keeping this history a where is sister Rose ? Can she be secret, and my name especially so, at dead ?

least so long as I live." 666 Oh! Madame ... Madame, come Intelligence has just reached me tliat instantly, quick .... they have forgotten Madame Louise Bénédictine de Simon her.'

died but a few days since. “. Forgotten! but where ?! ". In the correction, where they placed

HISTORICAL AND her on Sunday, a short time before the BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. commissioners of the district had arrived.'

SIR JAMES TYRREL, Sunday! and to day is Saturday !' To raise the trap-door, descend the stairs and throw open the door, was but the affair of a moment; but, oh! Mon- The following ingenious defence of the sieur, what a horrible sight met our gaze, above gentleman, is from the European and how could I have ever survived it! Magazine for June 1791.

The unhappy girl had perished with “ Lord Bacon, who has the specious hunger, and every thing around testified art of affecting candour where he means how cruel had been her agonies. Her to impress conviction against truth, has veil and woollen garments were torn into in the first instance established the report shreds, her crucifix broken, and she was of this supposed murder, and the supextended over these fragments. I took posed murderer, into a tale of truth, by hold of her round the middle of the body, design to impose it as such in his Hisand raised her up before me, stark and tory of Henry the Seventh, by way of rigid, as though of one single piece of Aattering that monarch, in order to curry framework. Her right hand had lace- favour after his fall. Without any warrated her bosom; her white and regular rant but his own authority, he asserts teeth, which her pain-contracted lips dis- that Henry caused Sir James Tyrrel and closed, were buried in her left arm, his man Dighton to be committed to the likewise bitten in several places. At Tower in 1493, and examined touching the same time her motionless eyes widely the death of the two innocent princes. open, appeared to stare me in the face. Now that cannot be true; because, on I could not longer sustain this horrible the testimony not only of Henry himcollision! I fell to the ground straining self, but of his parliament, three years her body in my arms. It was necessary afterwards, in 1497, Sir James Tyrrel to employ force to separate us. The bore an unstained character, and that in next day, when I had recovered my the eye of all the world; and nothing senses, I found my husband arrived, can bear a construction to the contrary, who carried me from the spot.

but he maintained it to his last breath « Such, Monsieur, was the deplorable of life. The occasion was this: the event which brings me hither every year Earl of Oxford, with whom Sir James on the 13th of October. I come, not to Tyrrel seems to have been well conask forgiveness of my dearest Rose for nected, had in the first parliament of the dreadful death Í caused her: oh Henry the Seventh, obtained an act for no! I am too certain that amidst all her the restoration of a maternal estate sufferings there neither escaped from which his mother, the Lady Oxford, heart or lips a single malediction against and her trustees, had conveyed to me; but I come to these ruins to pray Richard the Third, when he was only Heaven may unite us again in eternity. Duke of Gloucester, while the earl her I come to revisit that garden, those alleys, son was in prison : and this act, passed that cloister, wherein so often we swore a suggestion that the conveyances an eternal friendship, where so repeat- were executed by coercion ; it happened

on

afterwards that it was held, that there assured of the fact of it, by the late Eliab was no proof before the parliament, of Harvey, Esq. Barrister of Law, a desuch coercion, and, in the parliament of scendant of the Doctor's younger brother 1497, being the twelfth year of that of that name. king's reign, the earl applied for a con- “ Dr. Harvey was ever afraid of befirmation of that act, and offered evi. coming blind. Early one morning, for dence of the coercion, by producing seve- he always rose early, his housekeeper, ral gentlemen to prove it, who in the coming into his chamber to call him, words of the new act applied for, are opened the window shutters, told him styled “worshipful and credible persons," the hour, and asked him if he would not amongst whom is mentioned James Tyr- rise. Upon which, he asked if she had rel, knight. The truth of which re- opened the shutters :-—she replied yes.presentation will be found in the Rotuli Then shut them again :-she did so.Parliamentorum, Vol. 6, pp. 473, 474. Now open them again ;-but still the

It will appear that long after this time effect was the same to him, for he had Sir James Tyrrel was favoured and awakened stone-blind. Upon this, he trusted by Henry the Seventh, under told her to fetch him a bottle (which whom he held the office of Captain of she herself had observed to stand on a Guysne, which probably he held to his shelf in his chamber for a long time), dying day: he was beheaded in the out of which he drank a large draught, Tower in the year 1503, with Sir John and it being strong poison, which, it is Wyndham, on pretence of treason, in supposed, he had long before procured, plotting to assist in dethroning Henry and set there for this purpose, he expired in favour of the Earl of Suffolk. It is within three hours after.” remarkable, and reflects descredit on Dr. Harvey is buried in the obscure Lord Bacon, that, on that occasion, be village of Hempstead in Essex. In the observes, “That Lord Abergavenie, and church there is a monument erected to Sir Thomas Greene, were at the same him, with a long Latin inscription. It time apprehended and soon after de- appears, by the size of his coffin, now livered; that the Earl of Devonshire remaining in the vault under the church, remained prisoner in the Tower during that he was a man of very short stature. the king's life; that William de la Pole, The portraits of him, all agree in rewas also long restrained, though not so presenting him as a man of a very sagastraitly. But,” says he, “ for Sir James cious and penetrating countenance, and Tyrrel, against whom the blood of the of a body much extenuated by mental innocent princes, Edward the Fifth and labour and fatigue. his brother, did still cry from under the altar, and Sir John Wyndham, and the other meaner ones, they were attainted and executed.” By this apostrophe on In the year 1650, immediately after the Tyrrel, Lord Bacon meant to impress taking of Edinburgh Castle, which surthe fiction of his being taken into custody rendered on the 24th of December, and examined about the supposed mur

Cromwell sent Colonel Fenwick with his ders, of which we have reason to think own and Colonel Syder's regiment to there was never a suspicion till very long take Home-Castle; on which Fenwick after Tyrrel's death, and it was then

marched thither, drew up his troops, fixed on him because he was not living and sent the Governor the following sumto answer for himself. The memory of mons.-" His Excellency, the Lord Gethe dead is sacred, and should be defended ral Cromwell, has commanded me to for them ;-the living can answer for reduce this castle you now possess under themselves, and the murder must be obedience; which if you now deliver proved before it can be believed, which into my hands for his service, you shall now it never can be.

have terms for yourself, and those with

you;—if you refuse, I doubt not but in DEATH OF DR. W. HARVEY, THE DISCOVERER

a short time, by God's assistance, to ob

tain what I now demand. I expect your “ The following circumstantial account answer by seven of the clock to-morrow of the death of this eminent man,” says morning, and rest your servant, Hasted, in his History of Kent, “ I be

Geo. FENWICK.” lieve is little known beyond the family, The governor, whose name was Cockbut is related on the authority of a cler- burn, being it seems a man of fancy, regyman of the county of Kent, who was turned him this quibbling answer :

HOME-CASTLE.

OF THE CIRCULATION OF THE BLOOD.

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