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should bear me off to Doubting-castle. pointing perhaps through the trees from I knew nothing of the allegory of the whence the sound of that hollow bell work. The combat with Apollyon, the

How should we feel ?-But to roaring of the lions, the archers in Beel. our tale. zebub's castle; Great-heart, the

As I was comfortably seated, one chanted land, the cave strewn with

autumn evening, in the Plough tap-room human bones, all existed in my mind. at the village of L-, among a group, Jack-the-Giant- Killer alone came up to of peasants, their conversation turned my ideas of a great warrior; and as I upon the Old Hall, an ancient desolate grew older, I became more daring, and building standing near the wood. It hewed down monsters in the shape of had long been an object of terror to the thistles, or with a stick conquered a villagers, through rumours in circulation whole army in a bed of tall nettles, while of noises which were heard nightly in the harmless insects that flew away from and around its walls. my sturdy strokes were changed by me “I don't believe in ghosts,” said one into troops of distressed damsels and of our party, drawing nearer to bis comliberated knights.

panion as he spoke, for just then the “While yet a boy, I sought for ghosts, and

wind shook the old swing sign outside. sped

“I don't believe in them, because when Through many a listening chamber, cave, and

we are dead, if we go to heaven, we ruin, And star-light wood, with fearful steps pürsning shall never want to come here again to

Hopes of high talk with the departed dead : work; and if we get to the other place, I called on poisonous names, with which our why they'll never let us return whether

youth is fed. I was not beard : I saw thein not.”

we want or not, so for that reason I

don't believe in ghosts. I dare not say I am not superstitious

“ Well, believe what you like,” an. now : I should not like to disbelieve in

swered his companion; t but when my ghost stories : I believe that this weak brother Mark died, although he was a feeling (if such it may be called) has hundred miles off, and we did not know prevented many a murder. What is of his death, but just at the time the fear, or deep remorse? who ever saw

letter said he died, I heard three loud, Banquo arise before Macbeth, for the slow knocks at my chamber door; first time, without shuddering? and then (imitating the sounds as he spoke. A our Old Ballads, peopled with

dog, concealed under the long settle, Airy tongues, that syllable men's names."

gave a deep howl; and the wind, as if No! I would not become a disbeliever to sanction what he said, blew louder --for the love of poetry alone will I love the sceptic also shrugged up his the marvellous.

shoulders in fear); “ so I believe in Is there not something truly awful ghosts.” connected with death ? (unless it be in “ If you don't believe in ghosts,” said a battle.field—then, like a star, without an old man who sat smoking in the feeling a ray of our brightness extin- corner, "go sleep for a night at the Old guished, we shoot alone full bound Hall, as I have done,- I would not pass into darkness). Who ever heard the such another night if I might have all sound of a death-bell, when they were London.” walking alone in a dark wood, without “Why would you not ?" inquired the feeling sadly depressed ? Seem we not first speaker; “ I've often looked in at then as if marshalled into the presence of the broken windows in the day-time, but the departed spirit : nothing around us saw nothing." but a dim green light, not a sound per- “ Perhaps not,” answered the old man, haps, except that deep booming that "ghosts never walk at daytime; but if seems to shake the vaulted sky; or the I saw nothing, I lieard enough to make low murmur of a brook that hurries me believe in ghosts." along, gibbering and plashing, and “Well, what did you hear ?” inquired moaning, like the stifled words of the another. dying. On every hand, trees hoary and “Why," continued the old man, “I old, matted and massed together, in a lay awake listening until I heard the thousand fantastic forms. What a place church clock strike twelve; the night for a spirit to arise in !-one whom we was very still; and after awhile, somehad injured by word or deed--a dim thing came slowly up stairs, pat, pát, moving shadow-a thing of dread and pat, until it reached my chamber door, misery, gliding with dull downcast eyes, which I had left partly open. Then I finger on lip, and arm outstretched, pulled the clothes over my head, for I began to feel terribly alarmed, and I lay in, and after some further conversation, listening, and listening"

during which we plunged deeply into “Well, what did you see?” inquired the “ berry brown ale, it was decided, another, eagerly.

that on the next evening four of us "Well, I lay listening—and listen- should stay all night in the Old Hall; ing,” said the old man, determined not thereby hoping to settle all further disto be burried by his companions; “I putes respecting the existence of ghosts. should think I listened for ten minutes, On the next evening, we set out upon and neither stirred hand nor foot, and our journey to the Old Hall. Autumn at last, I heard the same sound go pat, had already far advanced, and the variepat, pat, down stairs again."

gated foliage, which had so beautifully “ Did you see anything ?” was the decorated the trees, was fast falling, and inquiry.

the “sere and yellow leaf” rustled along “ No," said he, “but I fancy there our footpath, or careered in the winds must be money buried in the Old Hall, over the deep valleys; saving here and and those who concealed it cannot rest there, where a few branches still retained until they tell where it is.”

their hues of crimson, gold, and purple, “ Had I been you,” said one, “I last relics of the rich autumnal dyes. should have got up, and have addressed We descended into a wild glen, or it."

ravine, which extended for nearly a mile; “Would you,” replied the old man its sides were broken and rugged, and with a sneer,

" and pray what should precipices of rock-sand jutted out above you have said ?”

our heads, and as we looked upward, “I should have had a Bible in my their gnarled summits appeared almost band,” was the answer, and have said, to meet, leaving visible a faint line of "Who art thou? what wantest thou? light, through which was seen the blue Why dost thou appear? I should have sky. Old knotty trees were occasionally said so three times three; then it would thrown across their ridgy heights, and have been compelled to answer me. I overhung the deep glen, bending their know this would have done, because I'ye aged heads, and looking down upon the heard my father say, that his great close-woven underwood of hazel, ivy, grandfather once heard of a man who and bramble, which were matted and spoke to a ghost in that way. It told mossed together amid long faded grass, him why it could not rest, and when he which all combined to make a dusky had done all it wanted, it never appeared twilight. again.”

Not a sound was heard in the ravine, “ Is it true," inquired another, “that excepting the low murmur of a brook, a woman in white, without a head, is that moaned restlessly along, like the seen on Morton Bank every night, at gibbering tongues of supernatural beings. twelve o'clock ?"

We ascended from this gloomy glen, “ Not every night," answered the old which terminated by the side of an old man; “ but it's true that there is one wood, by which stood the Old Hall. which walks there sometimes, for I once Never had I witnessed a finer abode for heard Ned King say that it chased him a ghost,—not another house was visible to the wood-gate one night. It is said, from its site, and it stood nearly hidden that about a hundred years ago, a man in dark fir trees, yews, and hollies, which murdered his wife there,—then cut off even at this season of the year still her head, and after that drowned her,- retained their verdure. Towering conand that her spirit has walked ever spicuously above these, were goodly since."

groups of ancient oaks and elms, that Well, I've never seen anything," tossed out their hoary and fantastic said the first speaker, " and I've been boughs to the wind, in which they had under Tom Otter’s gibbet - post at waved for centuries. Among them, Dringing-Hook when Saxelby clock has were visible innumerable ruins of an been striking twelve.”

extensive rookery ; but these dusky “ I've heard say he used to shout peoplers of the old trees, like the former after people, long after he was dead, to inhabitants of the hall, had long since take him down,” said a youth who had fled. The building was one of those so eagerly listened.

well calculated to call up recollections of Nonsense,” replied another; “ it was scenes of yore : its old oaken doors only the wind whistling through his heavily studded with iron, and bearing gibbet-irons."

marks of former batterings, told that The village schoolmaster next came there had been a day when banners were

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on high, and battles passed below. Its once beautiful gardens, was now nearly deep stone window-frames were glazed a mass of rank grass and weeds, with with painted glass ; but this was in only here and there a few flowers, which many places broken, and the free wind had grown and seeded year after year, swept through the old mansion. The without an eye to mark their beauty or massy porch Jeaned, with its rudely- decay. There might be seen the lowercarved pillars, awry, from whose strong ing sunflower's blackened stem peering summits bended the figures of full- above the hemlock and anemone, standcheeked cherubs, who appeared as if ing “a ruin amid ruins.”. The wide blowing their stony trumpets lustily. moat had long been dry, and many were The huge slab that rested before the the huge stones which once had strength. porchway, was covered with a green ened its steep sides, as bulwarks of the moss, which told that years had swept soil, but they now lie nearly buried by since the foot of man echoed over it. by moss and fungus in its deep bosom. The large chimneys and buttresses, that Two lofty columns, formed of the small projected from the sides of the immense bricks which were so much in use during fabric, outdid, in size, many of our the early part of the sixteenth century, modern apartments. We entered the command what doubtless was formerly venerable mansion, and saw the walls, the carriage entrance to the hall; one which were once wainscoted, now nearly leans as if it sought a tomb amid the naked, or where here and there, an old portions of its fallen strength, that have oaken panel hung loosely, it had become long since safely rested in the surrounda plaything to the wind. A doorlessing moat. The pillars are surmounted by cellar stood at the end of the kitchen, two urns, or cups, but they have also but its entrance was blocked up by the shared the fate of everything around, ruins of a stone staircase, which had one having had its head broken off, and fallen therein, portions of it still being the base turned uppermost; the other visible. In the kitchen, or servants' hall, leaning in a different direction from the stood an ancient oaken table, supported falling column it decorates. The orby four large, urn-like legs : it was black chard contains a variety of trees, whose with age, and well calculated to support grey stems have grown into grotesque those heavy joints on which our fore- figures, and form a striking contrast to fathers were wont to dine; while the the stately forest trees with which they black-jack rumbled on wheels that bore are surrounded. In the centre, stands the nut-brown ale. Two old high- an immense pear tree, rising like a backed chairs, such as an antiquarian giant above its pigmy companions; some loves to look upon, also stood in the have long ago ceased to bring forth fruit, apartment; these were the only rem- others have been torn from their foundanants of its former furniture, unless we tion by some tree-tearing wind, and leap reckon a large grate, before which a over, with a portion of their fantastic whole sheep might with ease have been roots visible, as if they were waiting to roasted. À wide balustraded staircase lay their heavy heads among the long stood at the end of this room, which we grass, which has not been disturbed by ascended with caution, for many of the the sweeping scythe for many years.

At steps were broken. In the large room, one end of the orchard is a deep black that extended over the farthest apart- pond, overhung by lawthorn, brambles, ment, stood one of those quaint, high- and three dwarf oaks, that look quietly testered bedsteads, with its curious old down upon the pool in which their strong curtains, on which some long-forgotten stems are faithfully reflected. A few hand had enwrought in the tapestry aged willows and alders complete the Jacob's dream, where troops of red. rugged fence : here have frogs dwelt winged angels were ascending a blue undisturbed for many generations, no Jadder, that led to a yellow heaven. I hoof-mark of kine or steed being visible. thought the bed bore signs of having From the remains of bricks and stone been slept in recently, but made no beyond the moat, it appears that the remark to my companions.

ball was formerly separated from the entered the servants' hall, and kindled a wood by a long wall; very little of it is fire in the rusty grate, which caused a visible, excepting that part where formrustling among the tenants of the chim- erly stood the postern door. ney; we then went to examine the have been intende as a place of retreat, interior of the building.

as the old trees which stood in various Far around this decaying edifice parts of the wood, leave no doubt of its breathing ruin was visible; what were antiquity.

We re

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As the darkness was now advancing, more like a fearful grin--the contracted and we had closely examined the most lip, alarmed eye, and trembling hand striking parts of this ghost-tenanted which held the smoky lamp, bore too edifice, we threw a portion of our fuel evident signs of fear.' I, too, felt as if upon the fire, which gave the old hall my heart had diminished to nothing-a a cheerful appearance.

We then drew kind of low fearful dread had taken our heavy chairs towards the fire, trim- full possession of my soul, and at that med our lamp, filled our pipes, and moment I did of a verity believe in ancorked a bottle of humming ale, and ghosts. Slowly, sadly, and fearfully sat in readiness for the entrance of either did we descend the wide staircase abreast, Mr. or Mrs. Ghost.

when, behind the door which we had Night came on in deep autumnal left open, and which the wind had blackness--one of those moonless nights, further moved, we beheld a pair of whose “nodding horrors make darkness bright fiery eyes fully rivetted upon us. visible." The wind had arisen, and I do not believe it is possible for the hair lifting up its deep voice, roared loudly, to stand on end, however alarmed a persweeping along the bending forest, which son may be, if so, ours would at that groaned beneath its airy thunder, and moment have been erected like porcushouting through the grated windows of pines' quills. But our glances were atthe dark cellars beneath our feet, as if a tracted to those wild eyes, which shone host of shrieking demons had bestrode so clearly out from the gloom of that the rolling gale.

door, whose shadow preventing us from The loosened wainscoting flapped recognizing the form to whom they beupon the echoing walls, the owls had longed, we stood as a charmed bird is been disturbed from their dark abode in supposed to stand before the awe-striking the chimney by our crackling fire, and rattlesnake, and big drops of cold sweat were now abroad hooting and answering were gathered upon and dropping from to each other from the roof and sur- our brows. We had no pistols ; indeed rounding forest trees. As we sat in we had not for a moment anticipated silence, eyeing the ruddy blaze, or hearing of anything beside the howling, listening to the wild outcry abroad, we wind and hooting owls. But we had heard something fall heavily upon the now distinctly heard the tread of naked oaken floor above our heads, which footsteps ; and there were those eyes, caused us to start involuntarily from our which had already twice moved. I had

Cautiously did we ascend the just made up my mind for a spring down balustraded staircase abreast, assuming the remainder of the steps, intending to all the courage we were masters of ;- dart through the open door, clear the carefully did we look around; and had wood, and come no more a ghosting, one of those inhabitants of the invisible when lo ! out came the dreaded object world stood in the centre of that room, from behind the door-shadow, which we should not have been so much sur- was nothing less than a noble fox-hound, prised as terrified ; indeed, we had that had doubtless been lost during the wrought up our minds to that pitch, chase that day in the woods.

We once which was readily prepared to witness more drew up to the cheering hearth, something extraordinary. We looked and laughed at our own fears, while we around, and perceived the faded cur- gave the hungry animal a portion of our taining of the antique bed to move, supper, who soon stretched his lazy but

convinced by the length before the fire in true doggish flickering of our lamp that this was ease. It was about ten o'clock when we owing to the wind. On the floor we decided upon clearing away the rubbish observed a board which had fallen, hay- which obstructed the entrance of the ing been blown down from its station in cellar; and as we had found a couple of the window, where it had but recently spades and a pickaxe in one of the outbeen reared, to keep out the wind from houses, in a few minutes we commenced entering in at a broken pane. While labouring with as much eagerness and we were replacing the cause of this more curiosity than grave-diggers, and "needless alarm," a low whine issued by eleven had succeeded in boring from below, and as we stood listening several steps. We now resigned our with suspended breath, we distinctly labours, and commenced an attack upon heard the tread of soft footsteps, pacing the bottle and tobacco, until we got rapidly to and fro in the hall. My com- as we didna' mind the wind a whistle ;" panions looked me full in the face, and and as we sat chatting and trolling tried to smile; it would not do, it was forth old staves of “Robin Hood and

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Chevy Chase,” smoking and patting the MOHAMMEDANISM. noble dog, we forgot all about the ghost, until all in a moment, sudden and start- Great part of the success, if not the ling as would have been the sound of the origin of a religion which, from the exlast trumpet, we heard one of the doors tensiveness of its operations, may be conup-stairs close with a loud bang, and a sidered as one of the greatest events in heavy foot walked slowly, or seemed to the history of mankind, may be traced stagger, across the floor overhead. This to the importance of wealth and the inwas no dream: sounded like the foot fluence of women. Poverty, as Cardiof a heavy warrior, loud and firm, and nal de Retz justly observes, is the grave made the old rickety window frames of many a grand design. And so low chatter at every stride. The noble fox- in circumstances was Mohammed in the hound erected his ears to listen, high as early part of his life, that had it not the long laps would allow.

been for the weight and power which he

derived from his marriage with a rich “ Inspiring John Barleycorn,

widow, his enthusiasm might perhaps Wbat dangers dost thon make us scorn."

have just existed and expired with himWe had now grown hardened, and I self. His father Abdallah was a younger believe if his Satanic majesty had entered son of Abdollmotalleb, chief of the we should not have Aed without first Koreish tribe: but dying young, he left having a squint at his club-feet and Mohammed and his mother, for all their long tail, or being satisfied if he really estate, only five camels and an Ethiopian were horned.

slave. When he arrived at man's estate, " Come along, said Pedagogue, his fortune was, of consequence, so humshouldering the pickaxe, “ come along, ble, that he was recommended by his bring the lamp (hiccup); if it be the uncle as factor to the widow Kadijah, devil I'll have a shy at him, if I lose my who carried on an extensive trade with stick.”

Syria and other countries. This lady Seizing the lamp, we

was of a noble family and of the same ascended the staircase ; but before we tribe. She had been twice married, she had reached the landing-place, we heard had been largely left by both husbands, something fall heavily upon the floor. and had improved the whole by comA deep groan followed the fall-then we

Her young factor was esteemed heard a heavy breathing—we clung to- the handsomest man of his age : his gether—we endeavoured to look drunk- genius was quick, and his address insinenly brave, but the clenched teeth belied uating. She made him her third husour courage.

Could we retreat ? No: band; and with her hand she gave him We listened again, and heard a thick the disposal of her fortune. Being a husky voice exclaim, “ Fill this pint.” man of birth, this raised him at once We rushed in, and found our old com.' from a menial station to a level with panion, who had so strongly argued for the first nobles of Arabia, and gave him the existence of ghosts at the public. consequence, independence, and leisure house. He had come there drunk, by a sufficient to prepare the plans for his well-known entrance, and lest any one future greatness. It was fifteen years should drive him from his domicile, he after this marriage before he publicly still maintains that there are ghosts, and assumed the prophetical character; and continues to live rent-free; and when he he then met with such vigorous opposiis not too tipsy, regularly haunts the Old tion, particularly from the leading men Hall. THOMAS MILLER. of his own tribe, that, nearly crushed as

he often was, he must probably have been quite overwhelmed, had not his

riches, by increasing his power, his im. Buffon says, “ Invention depends on patience: contemplate your subject long; him with resources to overcome difficul

portance, and his proselytes, furnished it will gradually unfold, till a sort of ties which might otherwise have baffled electric spark convulses for a moment

all the vigour of his genius. The prothe brain, and spreads down to the phet at his death left many widows, four very heart and glow of irritation,'

of whom, whilst they lived, had consietc. etc. It is certain an author should derable weight in the councils of the

discouraged because the parts of Arabs, and thus contributed to the spread his story do not present themselves to of Mohammedanism. him at once.

merce.

COMPOSITION.

not

G. M. J.

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