Fragments of science for unscientific people

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D. Appleton, 1875 - 422 páginas

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Página 411 - XVIII. The Nature of Light: With a General Account of Physical Optics.
Página 318 - Fame is the spur that the clear spirit doth raise (That last infirmity of noble mind) To scorn delights and live laborious days; But the fair guerdon when we hope to find, And think to burst out into sudden blaze, Comes the blind Fury with th' abhorred shears, And slits the thin-spun life. 'But not the praise...
Página 416 - Our Place among Infinities: A Series of Essays contrasting our Little Abode in Space and Time with the Infinities Around us. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 6s. The Expanse of Heaven : A Series of Essays on the Wonders of the Firmament.
Página 108 - ... the passage from the physics of the brain to the corresponding facts of consciousness is unthinkable. Granted that a definite thought and a definite molecular action in the brain occur simultaneously, we do not possess the intellectual organ, nor, apparently, any rudiment of the organ, which would enable us to pass by a process of reasoning from the one phenomenon to the other. They appear together, but we do not know why.
Página xvi - that every particle of matter in the universe attracts every other particle, with a force whose direction is that of the line joining the two, and whose magnitude is directly as the product of their masses, and inversely as the square of their distances from each other.
Página 114 - Was war' ein Gott, der nur von aussen stiesse, Im Kreis das All am Finger laufen liesse ! Ihm ziemt's, die Welt im Innern zu bewegen, Natur in Sich, Sich in Natur zu hegen, So dass, was in Ihm lebt und webt und ist, Nie Seine Kraft, nie Seinen Geist vermisst.
Página 108 - I do not think he is entitled to say that his molecular groupings and his molecular motions explain everything. In reality they explain nothing. The utmost he can affirm is the association of two classes of phenomena, of whose real bond of union he is in absolute ignorance. The problem of the connection of body and soul is as insoluble in its modern form as it was in the pre-scientific ages.
Página 84 - Self-reverence, self-knowledge, self-control, These three alone lead life to sovereign power. Yet not for power (power of herself Would come uncall'd for) but to live by law, Acting the law we live by without fear; And, because right is right, to follow right Were wisdom in the scorn of consequence.
Página 416 - The Principles of Mental Physiology. With their Applications to the Training and Discipline of the Mind, and the Study of its Morbid Conditions.
Página 416 - ADDRESS DELIVERED BEFORE THE BRITISH ASSOCIATION, assembled at Belfast. By JOHN TYNDALL, FRS, President. Revised, with additions, by the author, since the delivery.

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