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AS YOU LIKE IT.*

1

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* AS YOU LIKE IT.) Shakespeare has followed Lodge's Rosalynd, or Euphues' Golden Legacye, 4to. 1590, more exactly than is his general custom when he is indebted to such worthless originals ; and has sketched some of his principal characters, and borrowed a few expressions from it. "His imitations, &c. however, are in general too insignificant to merit transcription.

It should be observed, that the characters of Jaques, the Clown, and Audrey, are entirely of the poet's own formation.

Although I have never met with any edition of this comedy before the year 1623, it is evident, that such a publication was at least designed. At the beginning of the second volume of the entries at Stationers' Hall, are placed two leaves of irregular prohibitions, notes, &c. Among these are the following:

Aug. 4.
you like it, a book.
Henry the Fift, a book.

to be staid." “ The Comedy of Much Ado, a book. The dates scattered over these plays are from 1596 to 1615.

STEEVENS. This comedy, I believe, was written in 1600. See my Attempt to ascertain the Order of Shakespeare's Plays.

MALONE.

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PERSONS REPRESENTED.

Duke, living in Exile.
Frederick, Brother to the Duke, and Usurper of

his Dominions.
Amiens, Lords attending upon the Duke in his
Jaques, S Banishment.
Le Beau, a Courtier attending upon Frederick.
· Charles, his Wrestler.
Oliver,
Jaques, Sons of Sir Rowland de Bois.
Orlando,
Adam,

Servants to Oliver.
Dennis,
Touchstone, a Clown.
Sir Oliver Mar-text, a Vicar.
Corin,

Sylvius, Shepherds.

William, a Country Fellow, in love with Audrey. A Person representing Hymen.

Rosalind, Daughter to the banished Duke.
Celia, Daughter to Frederick.
Phebe, a Shepherdess.
Audrey, a Country Wench.

Lords belonging to the two Dukes; Pages, Fo

resters, and other Attendants.

The SCENE lies, first, near Oliver's House; after

wards, partly in the Usurper's Court, and partly in the Forest of Arden.

The list of the persons was added by Mr. Rowe. Johnson.

AS YOU LIKE IT.

ACT I. SCENE I.

An Orchard, near Oliver's House.

Enter ORLANDO and ADAM.

ORL. As I remember, Adam, it was upon this fashion bequeathed me by will, but poor a* thou- 1630.0r, sand crowns; and, as thou say’st, charged my brother, on his blessing, to breed me well :: and there

* As I remember, Adam, it wasto breed me well] Thrown out with the ease and freedom of the most familiar dialogue, the language of Shakespeare receives here, as we conceive, the following easy and natural interpretation :

“ It was upon this fashion bequeathed me by [my father in his] will, but poor a (i. e. the poor pittance of a thousand crowns; and, as thou say'st, [it was, or he there) charged my brother

upon his blessing to breed me well.” The question then is, whether instead of this, our author's text as delivered down to us, and his natural, but unconnected, dialogue, we are to substitute (and that in the opening of a comedy, and conversation between a master and a ser. vant) the new punctuation and argumentative formality adopted by the modern editors from Dr. Johnson, who gives it thus: As I remember, Adam, it was upon this fashion bequeathed me. By will, but a poor," &c.

This substitution appears to us hard and unnatural: and

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