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NON-FULFILLMENT OF CONTRACTS.

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“bungoes" had all gone up with the Orus. There were left two or three small canoes, and the scenes of competition around these were exciting, and often ludicrous in the extreme. Now a man would contract for passage for himself and friend, and while absent to arrange some little matter preparatory to a start, some one would offer the worthy Padrone (captain) a higher price, when he would immediately put the trunks of the first two on shore, and take on board those of the latter, together with their owners, and shove out into the stream. Now the first two would appear, with hands filled with refreshments for the voyage, and begin to look around for their boat. In a moment their eyes fall upon their trunks, and the truth flashes across their imagination. Now the scene of excitement begins. The boat is ordered to the shore, it don't come, and they attempt to wade out to it. The first step convinces them of the impracticability of this expedient, as they sink into the mud to their necks. Revolvers are flourished, but they can be used by both parties, consequently are not used at all.

Chapter Third .

FIRST ATTEMPT AT BOAT BUILDING-EXCITEMENT "ON 'CHANGE"-A LAUNCH AND CLEAR.

ANCE—THE CREW-A YUTINY-QUELLED-POOR ACCOMMODATIONS--A NIGHT IN ANGER AN ANTHEM TO THE SUN-NATURE IN FULL DRESS.

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We saw but one alternative, which was, to construct a boat ourselves, and work it up the river. Upon this we decided, and purchasing the temporary berths of our vessel, soon had a boat on the stocks, 6 feet by 19, and in three days it was afloat at the side of the "Marietta,” receiving its freight. We called it the “Minerva," and she was probably the first American-bottom ever launched at this port. A misfortune here befel me which I will relate somewhat minutely, as it was undoubtedly the cause of the death of a party concerned. In going out one morning to assist in the construction of the boat, I left my vest, which had a sum of money sewed up in the upper side pocket, in my berth, covered in such a manner I thought no one could discover it. I did not give it a thought during the day, but on going to my berth in the evening, I noticed the covering had been disturbed, and as my room-mates were in the habit of helping themselves to prunes, from a box in my berth, I imagined they had discovered and taken care of it. I was the more strongly impressed that this was the case from the fact that they had frequently spoken of my carelessness. I immediately saw them; they had seen nothing of it. Watches were stationed and the ship searched, but no trace of the money. A person who had had access to the cabin on that day for the first time was strongly suspected, but no trace of the money found. Our suspicions, however, were well founded, as the sequel will show. The passengers very kindly offered to make up a part of the loss, but as I had a little left I most respectfully declined its acceptance. We had about 3000 lbs. of freight and nine persons,

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