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THE

WORKS

OF

SIR WALTER RALEGH, Kt.

THE LIVES OF THE AUTHOR,

IN EIGHT VOLUMES.

VOL. III.

THE HISTORY OF THE WORLD.
BOOK II. CHAP. I—XIII. 4.

OXFORD,

AT THE UNIVERSITY PRESS.
MDCCCXXIX.

NOW FIRST COLLECTED:

TO WHICH ARE PREFIXED

BY OLDfS AND BIRCH.

[graphic][graphic]

THE CONTENTS.

BOOK II.

CHAP. I.

Of the time of the birth of Abraham; and of the use of this

question for the ordering of the story of the Assyrian empire.

Sect. I. Of some of the successors of Semiramis; with a brief

transition to the question, about the time of the birth of Abra-

ham. P. i

Sect. II. A proposal of reasons or arguments, that are brought

to prove Abraham was born in the year 292 after the flood,

and not in the year 352. 3

Sect. III. The answer to one of the objections proposed, shewing

that Abraham made but one journey out of Mesopotamia into

Canaan; and it after his father's death. 4

Sect. IV. The answer to another of the objections proposed,

shewing that it was not unlikely that Terah should beget

Abraham in his 130th year. n

Sect. V. The answer to two more of the objections; shewing

that we may have certainty of Abraham's age from the scrip-

ture, though we make not Abraham the eldest son; and that

there was great cause, why in the story of Abraham his two

brethren should be respected. 12

Sect. VI. That the naming of Abraham first of the three bre-

thren, Gen. xi. 26. doth not prove that he was the eldest; to-

gether with divers reasons proving that Abraham was not the

eldest son of Terah. 14

Sect. VII. A conclusion of this dispute, noting the authors on

both sides; with an admonition that they which shorten the

times make all ancient stories the more unprobable. 19

Sect. VIII. A computation of the times of the Assyrians, and

others, grounded upon the times noted in the story of Abra-

ham. 22

Sect. IX. That Amraphel, one of the four kings whom Abraham

overthrew, Gen. xiv. may probably be thought to have been

Ninias the son of Ninus. 24

Sect. X. Of Arioch another of the four kings; and that Ellas,

whereof he is said to have been king, lies between Coelesyria

and Arabia Petrsea. 26

Sect. XI. Of Tidal, another of the four kings. 28

Sect. XJJ. That Chedorlaomer, the chief of the four kings, was

not of Assyria, but of Persia; and that the Assyrian empire at

this time was much impaired. 29

Sect. XIII. That it is not improbable that the four kings had no

dominion in the countries named, but that they had elsewhere

with their colonies planted themselves, and so retained the

names of the countries whence they came; which if it be so,

we need not say that Amraphel was Ninias, nor trouble our-

selves with many other difficulties. 32

CHAP. II.

Of the kings of Egypt from the first peopling of it after the flood,

to the time of the delivery of the Israelites from thence.

Sect. I. A brief of the names and times of the first kings of

Egypt; with a note of the causes of difficulty in resolving of

the truth in these points. 36

Sect. II. That by the account of the Egyptian dynasties, and

otherwise, it appears that Cham's reign in Egypt began in the

year after the flood 191. 38

Sect. III. That these dynasties were not divers families of kings,

but rather successions of regents, ofttimes many under one

king. 40

Sect. IV. Of Cham, and his son Mizraim, or Osiris. 43

Sect. V. Of the time when Osiris's reign ended; and that Jacob

came into Egypt in the time of Orus the son of Osiris. 44

Sect. VI. Of Typhon, Hercules JEgyptius, Orus, and the two

Sesostres, successively reigning after Misraim; and of divers

errors about the former Sesostris. 47

Sect. VII. Of Busiris the first oppressor of the Israelites; and of

his successor, queen Thermutis, that took up Moses out of the

water. 51

Sect. VIII. Of the two brethren of queen Thermutis; and what

king it was under whom Moses was born; and who it was

that perished in the Red sea. 53
CHAP. III.

Of the delivery of Israel out of Egypt.

Sect. I. Of the time of Moses's birth, and how long the Israelites

were oppressed in Egypt. 56

Sect. II. Of divers cities and places in Egypt mentioned in this

story, or elsewhere in the scripture. 59

Sect. III. Of the cruelty against the Israelites' young children in

Egypt; and of Moses's preservation and education. 62

Sect. IV. Of Moses's flying out of Egypt; and the opinions of

certain ancient historians of his war in Ethiopia, and of his

marriage there. Philo's judgment of his pastoral life, and that

of Pererius of the books of Genesis and Job. 64

Sect. V. Of Pharaoh's pursuit of the Israelites; and of their pas-

sage towards the Red sea, so far as Succoth. 69

Sect. VI. Of the solary and lunary years, and how they are re-

conciled; with the form of the Hebrew year, and their manner

of intercalation. 72

Sect. VII. Of the passage of Israel from Succoth towards the

Red sea; and of the divers ways leading out of Egypt. 78

Sect. VIII. Of their passage over the Red sea; and of the Red

sea itself. 80

Sect. IX. That the passage through the Red sea was miraculous,

and not at a low ebb. 85

CHAP. IV.

Of the journeying of the Israelites from the Red sea to the place

where the law was given them; with a discourse of laws.

Sect. I. A transition, by way of recapitulation of some things

touching chronology; with a continuance of the story, until

the Amalekites met with the Israelites. 89

Sect. II. Of the Amalekites, Midianites, and Kenites, upon occa-

sion of the battle with the Amalekites, and Jethro's coming;

who being a Kenite, was priest of Midian. 92

Sect. III. Of the time when the law was given; with divers com-

mendations of the invention of laws. 95

Sect. IV. Of the name and meaning of the words law and

right. 97

Sect. V. Of the definition of laws, and of the law eternal. 101

Sect. VI. Of the law of nature. 104

Sect. VII. Of the written law of God. 112

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