Reasonable Elocution: A Text-book for Schools, Colleges, Clergymen, Lawyers, Actors, Etc

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A.S. Barnes, 1874 - 211 páginas

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Página 159 - Against thee, thee only, have I sinned, and done this evil in thy sight; that thou mightest be justified when thou speakest, and be clear when thou judgest.
Página 62 - And it came to pass, that when he was returned, having received the kingdom, then he commanded these servants to be called unto him, to whom he had given the money, that he might know how much every man had gained by trading.
Página 189 - , good Iras ; quick. — Methinks, I hear Antony call ; I see him rouse himself To praise my noble act : I hear him mock The luck of Caesar, which the gods give men To excuse their after wrath : Husband, I come : Now to that name my courage prove my title ! I am fire, and air ; my other elements I give to baser life.
Página 164 - I had as lief not be, as live to be In awe of such a thing as I m,yself.
Página 97 - And the. eye cannot say unto the hand, I have no need of thee : nor again the head to the feet, I have no need of you. ^Nay, much more those members of the body, which seem to be more feeble,
Página 151 - Favours to none, to all she smiles extends ; Oft she rejects, but never once offends. Bright as the sun, her eyes the gazers strike, And, like the sun, they shine on all alike. Yet graceful ease, and sweetness void of pride...
Página 59 - And, behold, they brought to him a man sick of the palsy, lying on a bed: and Jesus seeing their faith said unto the sick of the palsy; Son, be of good cheer; thy sins be forgiven thee.
Página 197 - Cover your heads and mock not flesh and blood With solemn reverence : throw away respect, Tradition, form and ceremonious duty, For you have but mistook me all this while : I live with bread like you, feel want, Taste grief, need friends : subjected thus, How can you say to me, I am a king ? Car.
Página 186 - Tis mightiest in the mightiest; it becomes The throned monarch better than his crown; His sceptre shows the force of temporal power, The attribute to awe and majesty, Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings; But mercy is above this sceptred sway, It is enthroned in the hearts of kings, It is an attribute to God himself, And earthly power doth then show likest God's When mercy seasons justice.
Página 182 - What's in a name ? that which we call a rose By any other name would smell as sweet; So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call'd, Retain that dear perfection which he owes Without that title. Romeo, doff thy name; And for that name, which is no part of thee, Take all myself.

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