Utopias: Or, Schemes of Social Improvement. From Sir Thomas More to Karl Marx

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C. K. Paul & Company, 1879 - 267 páginas

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Índice

I
1
II
14
III
31
V
49
VI
67
VII
88
VIII
110
IX
123
X
143
XI
159
XII
175
XIII
197
XIV
224
XV
242

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Passagens conhecidas

Página 141 - I confess I am not charmed with the ideal of life held out by those who think that the normal state of human beings is that of struggling to get on...
Página iv - I' the commonwealth I would by contraries Execute all things ; for no kind of traffic Would I admit ; no name of magistrate ; Letters should not be known ; riches, poverty, And use of service, none ; contract, succession, Bourn, bound of land, tilth, vineyard, none ; No use of metal, corn, or wine, or oil ; No occupation ; all men idle, all ; And women too, — but innocent and pure ; No sovereignty, — Seb.
Página 20 - We have three that bend themselves, looking into the experiments of their fellows, and cast about how to draw out of them things of use and practice for man's life and knowledge...
Página 142 - But the best state for human nature is that in which, while no one is poor, no one desires to be richer, nor has any reason to fear being thrust back by the efforts of others to push themselves forward.
Página 239 - ... you think it perfectly just that he should use his intellect to take the bread out of the mouths of all the other men in the town who are of the same trade with him ; or use his breadth and sweep of sight to gather some branch of the commerce of the country into one great cobweb, of which he is himself to be the central spider, making every thread vibrate with the points of his claws, and commanding every avenue with the facets of his eyes.
Página 10 - But you must with a crafty wile and a subtle train study and endeavour yourself, as much as in you lieth, to handle the matter wittily and handsomely for the purpose, and that which you cannot turn to good, so to order it that it be not very bad. For it is not possible for all things to be well, unless all men were good. Which I think will not be yet this good many years.
Página iv - All things in common nature should produce Without sweat or endeavour : treason, felony, Sword, pike, knife, gun, or need of any engine, Would I not have ; but nature should bring forth, Of its own kind, all foizon, all abundance, To feed my innocent people.
Página 20 - The end of our foundation is the knowledge of causes, and secret motion of things: and the enlarging of the bounds of human empire, to the effecting of all things possible.
Página 20 - ... that amongst the excellent acts of that king, one above all hath the pre-eminence. It was the erection and institution of an order, or society, which we call...
Página 8 - ... of them all hath of any side less than twenty miles of ground, and of some side also much more, as of that part where the cities be of farther distance asunder. None of the cities desire to enlarge the bounds and limits of their shires. For they count themselves rather the good husbands than the owners of their lands.

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