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5, SHOE LANE, AND PETERBOROUGH COURT, FLEET STREET.

JOEN K. CHAPMAN AND COMPANY, 5, SHOE LANE, AND

PBTERBOROUGE COURT, FLEET STREET.

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KING HENRY THE FIFTH,

Mr. CHARLES KEAN.
DUKE OF BEDFORD, 1 (Brothers to the Mr. DALY.
DUKE OF GLOUCESTER, King)
DUKE OF EXETER (Uncle to the King) Mr. COOPER.
DUKE OF YORK (Cousin to the King) Mr. FLEMING.
EARL OF SALISBURY,

Mr. WILSON.
EARL OF WESTMORELAND,

Mr. COLLETT. EARL OF WARWICK,

Mr. WARREN. ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY,

Mr. H. MELLON.
BISHOP OF ELY,

Mr. F. COOKE.
EARL OF CAMBRIDGE, (Conspirators Mr. T. W. EDMONDS.
LORD SCROOP,

against the Mr. CORMACK. SIR THOMAS GREY,

King) Mr. STOAKES. SIR Thomas ERPINGHAM, (Officers in Mr. GRAHAM. GOWER,

King Henry's Mr. G. EVERETT. FLUELLEN,

Army) Mr. MEADOWS. BATES,

Mr. DODSWORTH. WILLIAMS, (Soldiers in the same)

Mr. RYDER. NYM,

(formerly Servants to Mr. J. MORRIS. BARDOLPH, Falstaff, now Soldiers in Mr. H. SAKER. PISTOL,

the same)

Mr. FRANK MATTHEWS. Boy (Servant to them)

Miss KATE TERRY. ENGLISH HERALD,.

Mr. COLLIER.
CHORUS,

Mrs. CHARLES KEAN.
CHARLES THE SIXTH (King of France) Mr. TERRY.
LEWIS (the Dauphin)..

Mr. J. F. CATHCART.
DUKE OF BURGUNDY,

Mr. ROLLESTON. DUKE OF ORLEANS, .

Mr. BRAZIER. DUKE OF BOURBON,.

Mr. JAMES. THE CONSTABLE OF FRANCE, .

Mr. RAYMOND. RAMBURES, ?

Mr. WALTERS. (French Lords) GRANDPRÈ,

Mr. RICHARDSON. GOVERNOR OF HARFLEUR,

Mr. PAULO. MONTJOY (French Herald)

Mr. BARSBY.
ISABEL (Queen of France)

Miss MURRAY.
KATHARINE (Daughter of Charles and Isabel) Miss CHAPMAN.
QUICKLY (Pistol's Wife, a Hostess) ...... Mrs. W. DALY.
Lords, Ladies, Officers, French and English Soldiers, Messengers, and Attendants.

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The SCENE, at the Beginning of the Play, lies in England; but afterwards

in France.

STAGE DIRECTIONS. R. H. means Right Hand ; L. H. Left Hand; U. E. Upper Entrance R. H. C. Enters through the centre from the Right Hand; L. H. C. Enters through the centre from the Left Hand.

RELATIVE POSITIONS OF THE PERFORMERS WHEN ON THE STAGE. R. means on the Right Side of the Stage ; L. on the Left Side of the Stage; C. Centre of the Stage ; R. C. Right Centre of the Stage; L. C. Left Centre of the Stage.

The reader is supposed to be on the Stage, facing the Audience.

THE SCENERY Painted by Mr. GRIEVE and Mr. TELBIN,

Assisted by Mr. W. GORDON, Mr. F. LLOYDS,

Mr. CUTHBERT, Mr.

ES, Mr. MORRIS, &c., &c.

THE MUSIC under the direction of Mr. ISAACSON.

THE DANCE IN THE EPISODE by Mr. CORMACK. TAD DECORATIONS AND APPOINTMENTS by Mr. E. W. BRADWELL.

THE DRESSES by Mrs. and Miss HOGGINS.

THE MACHINERY by Mr. G. HODSDON.

PERRUQUIER, Mr. ASPLIN, of No. 13, New Bond Street.

* For reference to Historical Authorities indicated by Letters,

see end of each Act.

PREFACE.

In the selection of my last Shakespearean revival at the Princess's Theatre, I have been actuated by a desire to present some of the finest poetry of our great dramatic master, interwoven with a subject illustrating a most memorable era in English history. No play appears to be better adapted for this two-fold purpose than that which treats of Shakespeare's favorite hero, and England's favorite king-Henry the Fifth.

The period thus recalled is flattering to our national pride; and however much the general feeling of the present day may be opposed to the evils of war, there are few amongst us who can be reminded of the military renown achieved by our an. cestors on the fields of Crecy, Poitiers, and Agincourt, without a glow of patriotic enthusiasm.

The political motives which induced the invasion of France in the year 1415 must be sought for in the warlike spirit of the times, and in the martial character of the English sovereign. "It is sufficient for dramatic purposes that a few thousands of our countrymen, in their march through a foreign land, en. feebled by sickness and encompassed by foes, were able to subdue and scatter to the winds the multitudinous hosts of *France, on whose blood-stained soil ten thousand of her bravest sons lay slain, mingled with scarcely one hundred Englishmen! * Such a marvellous disparity might well draw forth the pious acknowledgment of King Henry,–

“ O God, thy arm was here;

And not to us, but to thy arm alone,
Ascribe we all.-When, without stratagem,
But in plain shock and even play of battle,
Was ever known so great and little loss
On one part and on the other ?-Take it, God,

For it is only thine !" Shakespeare in this, as in other of his dramatic histories, has closely followed Holinshed; but the light of his genius irradiates the dry pages of the chronicler. The play of Henry the Fifth is not only a poetical record of the past, but it is, as it were, “a song of triumph,” a lay of the minstrel pouring forth

* The English authorities vary in their statements from seventeen to one hundred killed. The French historian, Monstrelet, estimates the loss of his countrymen at ten thousand men.

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