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PIONEER FOUNDERS OF GOVERNMENT IN WISCONSIN (1) Governor Henry Dodge, 1836-1841-1845-1848; (2) Governor James Duane Doty, 1841-1844; (3) Governor Nathaniel P.' Tallmage, 1844-1845: (4) Col. W. S. Hamilton. Hamilton's Diggings; (5) Judge Morgan L. Martin. Green Bay.

STATISTICS RELATING TO WISCONSIN

FROM THE 1920 CENSUS

BY E. E. WITTE

Chief, Legislative Reference Library

W

HILE the Fourteenth Census was taken in 1920, certain por

tions of this census have as yet not been made public by the United States Census Bureau. The census data already published, however, makes it certain that while the population of Wisconsin in

creased somewhat less rapidly between 1910 and 1920 than did the population of the country as a whole, the Badger State made more rapid progress than the country at large both in agriculture and manufactures.

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POPULATION
Total Population

Wisconsin is the twenty-fifth state in area, but the thirteenth state in population. This has been the rank of Wisconsin in population at each census since 1900. In 1920 the total population of the state was 2,632,067, which is 2.5 per cent of

the entire population of the United States. This E. E. WITTE gives Wisconsin an average density per square

mile of 47.6 people, as compared with 35.5 for the country as a whole. Of all northern states east of the Mississippi river, however, only Maine and Vermont are less densely populated than is Wisconsin. Within the state the density of population varies greatly, ranging 7.2 people per square mile in Florence county to 2,295.5 people per square mile in Milwaukee county.

Between 1910 and 1920 the population of Wisconsin increased 12.8 per cent. This is identically the same rate of increase as between 1900 and 1910. For the entire United States the percentage of increase in population during the last decade was 14.9 per cent. Of the increase in population in Wisconsin, more than two-thirds was in cities of over 25,000 and nearly 40 per cent of the total in Mil. waukee alone.

The population of Wisconsin at each census since 1840 and the increase over the preceding census is shown in Table I.

TABLE 1-POPULATION OF WISCONSIN, 1840 TO 1920

Increase over preceding census

Census Year

Population

Number

1920. 1910. 1900 1890. 1880.

1870. 1860 1850 1840.

TABLE II-POPULATION OF WISCONSIN BY COUNTIES

County

Adams. Ashland. Barron Bayfield. Brown Buffalo Burnett Calumet Chippewa. Clark Columbia Crawford Dane. Dodge Door Douglas. Dunn Eau Claire Florence Fond du Lac Forest .. Grant.. Green. Green Lake. Iowa. Iron Jackson Jefferson. Juneau. Kenosha Kewaunee. La Crosse. Lafayette Langlade. Lincoln... Manitowoc Marathon Marinette Marquette Milwaukee. Monroe. Oconto Oneida Outagamie. Ozaukee Pepin. Pierce. Polk Portage. Price. Racine.

Per cent of increase for the United States

Per cent

2,632,067
2.333, 860
2,069,042
1,693,330
1,315,497

298, 207
261, 818
375, 712
377,833
260,827

12.8
12.8
22.2
28.7
24.7

14.9 21.0 20.7 25.5 30,1

1,054,670

775, 881
305, 391
30,945

278,789
470, 490
274, 446

35.9
154.1
SRA.9

22.6 35.6 35.9

1920

1910

1900

9,287 24,538 34,281 17, 201 61.889 15,615 10, 735 17, 228 36,482 35, 120 30, 468 16,772 89, 432 49, 742 19,073 49, 771 26.970 35, 771

3,602 56,119

9,850 39,044 21.568 14,875 21,504 10, 261 17, 716 35,022 19, 209 51,284 16.091 44,355 20,002 21,471 21.084 51, 614 65.259 34, 361 10, 443 539, 419 28, 666 27.104 13, 996 55. 113 16,335

7,481 21, 663 26, 870 33.619 18.517 78,961

8,604 21,965 29,114 15, 987 54.098 16,006

9,026 16,701 32, 103 30,674 31, 129 16,288 77, 435 47, 436 18,711 47.422 25, 260 32,721

3,381 51, 610

6, 782 39,007 21.641 15, 491 22, 497

8.306 17,075 34,306 19,569 32,929 16,784 43, 996 20.075 17,062 19.064 44,978 55,054 38, 812 10.741 433, 187 28. 881 25.657 11, 133 49. 102 17. 123

7.577 22,079 21,367 30.945 13,795 57,424

9, 141 20, 176 23, 677 14,392 46, 359 16,765

7,473 17,078 33,037 25,848 31, 121 17,286 69, 435 46.631 17,583 36.335 25,043 31, 692

3,197 47,589

1,396 38,881 22,719 15,797 23.114

6, 616 17,466 34,789 20.629 21, 707 17,212 42,997 20,959 12,553 16,269 42,261 43, 256 30,822

10,509 330.017 28, 103 20.874

8,875 46, 247 16.363

7,905 23.943 17,801 29, 483

9.106 45,644

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Fourteen of the seventy-one counties of the state lost slightly in population between 1910 and 1920. On the other hand one county (Kenosha) increased its population by more than 50 per cent, and six counties by between 25 per cent and 50 per cent. Of these seven counties which had the greatest increases in population, five are rural counties of northern Wisconsin and two industrial counties of southeastern Wisconsin. All of the counties which lost population are predominately rural counties, not one of them having a city of above 10,000 population.

of the large cities in Wisconsin, Kenosha had the greatest percentage of increase in population; and, in consequence, it advanced its ranking from the eighth to the third city of the state. Milwaukee and Racine held first and second places respectively, and both showed great increases in population. Madison, Beloit, Janesville, Manitowoc and West Allis are the other larger cities which increased their population by more than one-third during the decade.

Wisconsin has only one city classified by the census as a "large city,"— Milwaukee. This is the thirteenth city in the United States, with a total population of 457,147. Adding the suburbs, the total population of the metropolitan district of Milwaukee is 537,737. Aside from Milwaukee there are 20 other cities in Wisconsin with a population of above 10,000. There are also 20 cities with between 5,000 and 10,000 population, and 41 with a population between 2,500 and 5,000, while there are 375 cities and villages which have between 500 and 2,500 people.

Urban and Rural Population The census treats as urban territory cities with a population of 2,500 and over. Rural territory includes not only unincorporated towns, but villages and cities with a population of less than 2,500 as well.

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