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shall have first made a requisition upon the states to assess, levy, and pay, their respec tive proportions of such requisition, agreeably to the census fixed in the said Constitu tion, in such way and manner as the legislatures of the states shall think best; and in such case, if any state shall neglect or refuse to pay its proportion, pursuant to such requisition, then Congress may assess and levy such state's proportion, together with interest thereon at the rate of six per cent. per annuin, from the time of payment prescribed in such requisition.

V. That Congress erect no company of merchants with exclusive advantages of

VI. That no person shall be tried for any crime by which he may incur an infamous punishment, or loss of life, until he be first indicted by a grand jury, except in such cases as may arise in the government and regulation of the land and naval forces.

VII. The Supreme Judicial Federal Court shall have no jurisdiction of causes between citizens of different states, unless the matter in dispute, whether it concerns the realty or personalty, be of the value of three thousand dollars at the least; nor shall the federal judicial powers extend to any actions between citizens of different states, where the inatter in dispute, whether it concerns the realty or personalty, is not of the value of fifteen hundred dollars at least.

VIII. In civil actions between citizens of different states, every issue of fact, arising in actions at common law, shall be tried by a jury, if the parties, or either of them, request it.

IX. Congress shall at no time consent that any person, holding an office of trust or profit under the United States, shall accept of a title of nobility, or any other title or office, from any king, prince, or foreign state.

And the Convention do, in the naine and in behalf of the people of this commonwealth, enjoin it upon their representatives in Congress, at all times, until the altera : tions and provisions aforesaid have been considered, agreeably to the 5th article of the suid Constitution, to exert all their influence, and use all reasonable and legal methods, to obtain a ratification of the said alterations and provisions, in such manner as is provided in the said article.

And that the United States in Congress assembled may have due notice of the assent and ratification of the said Constitution by this Convention, it is Resolved, That the assent and ratification aforesaid be engrossed on parchment, together with the recommendation and injunction aforesaid, and with this resolution; and that his excellency, John Hancock, Esq., president, and the Hon. William Cushing, Esq., vice-president of this Convention, transmit the saine, countersigned by the secretary of the Convention, under their hands and seals, to the United States in Congress assembled.

JOHN HANCOCK, President.

WILLIAM CUSHING, Vice-President. GEORGE RICHARDS Minot, Secretary.

Pursuant to the resolution aforesaid, we, the president and vice-president above named, do hereby transmit to the United States in Congress assembled the same resolution, with the above assent and ratification of the Constitution aforesaid, for the United States, and the recommendation and injunction above specified. In witness whereof, we have hereunto set our hands and at Boston, in the

commonwealth aforesaid, this 7th day of February, Anno Domini 1788, and in the twelfth year of the independence of the United States of America.

JOHN HANCOCK, President. [L. s.
WM. CUSHING, Vice-President. (L. S.

6. STATE OF GEORGIA.
IN CONVENTION, WEDNESDAY, January 20, 1788.

To all to whom these Presents shall come, Greeting.
Whereas the form of a Constitution for the government of the United States of
America, was, on the 17th day of September, 1787, agreed upon and reported to Con.
gress by the deputies of the said United States convened in Philadelphia, which said
Constitution is written in the words following, to wit:-

And whereas the United States in Congress assembled did, on the 28th day of September, 1787, rcsolde, unanimously, “ That the said report, with the resolutions and letter accompanying the same, be transmitted to the several legislatures, in order to be submittea to a Convention of delegates chosen in each state by the people thereof, in conformity to the resolves of the Convention made and provided in that case :

And whereas the legislature of the state of Georgia did, on the 26th day of October, 1787, in pursuance of the above-recited resolution of Congress, resolve, "That a Con. vention be elected on the day of the next general election, and in the saine manner that representatives are elected; and that the said Convention consist of not more than three members from each county; and that the said Convention should meet at Augusta, on the 4th Tuesday in December then next, and, as soon thereafter as convenient, proceed to consider the said report and resolutions, and to adopt or reject any part or the whole thereof; –

Now know ye, tnat we, the delegates of the people of the state of Georgia, in Con. vention niet, pursuant to the resolutions of the legislature aforesaid, having taken into our serious consideration the said Constitution, have assented to, ratified, and adopted, and by these presents do, in virtue of the powers and authority to us given by the people of the said state for that purpose, for and in behalf of ourselves and our constituents, fully and entirely assent to, ratify, and adopt, the said Constitution. Done in Convention, at Augusta, in the said state, on the 2d day of January, in the

year of our Lord 1788, and of ihe independence of the United States the 12th. In witness whereof, we have hereunto subscribed our names.

JOHN WEREAT, President,

and delegate for the county of Richmond. County of

County of
Chatham, . W. Stephens,

Glynn... George Handley,
Joseph Habersham.

Christopher Hillary, Effingham,.... ..Jenhim Davis,

J. Milton.
N. Brownson. Camden, Henry Osborn,
Burke,..
Edward Telfair,

James Seagrove,
H. Todd.

Jacob Weed.
Richmond,.. William Few, Washington,.. .Jared Irwin,
James M'Niel.

John Rutherford.
Wilkes,
Gen. Matthews, Greene, :

Robert Christmas,
Flor. Sullivan,

Thomas Daniel,
John King.

R. Middleton.
Liberty,... .James Powell,

John Elliot,
Jaines Maxwell.

7. MARYLAND.
IN CONVENTION OF THE DELEGATES OF THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF

MARYLAND, April 28, 1788. We, the delegates of the people of the state of Maryland, having fully considered the Constitution of the United States of America, reported to Congress by the Convention of deputies from the United States of America, held in Philadelphia, on the 17th day of September, in the year 1787, of which the annexed is a copy, and submitted to us by a resolution of the General Assembly of Maryland, in November session, 1707, do, for ourselves, and in the name and on the behalf of the people of this state, assent to and ratify the said Constitution. In witness whereof, we have hereunto subscribed our names.

GEO. PLATER, President.
Richard Barnes, Richard Potts,

George Gale,
Charles Chilton, Abraham Few,

Henry Waggaman,
N. Lewis Sewall, William Paca,

John Stewart,
William Tilghman,
William Granger,

James Gordon Heron,
Donaldson Yeales, Joseph Wilkinson,

Samuel Evans,
Isaac Perkins,
Charles Graham,

Fielder Bowie,
John Gale,

Jobn Cheslea, Jun. Osb. Sprigg,
N Hammond,
W. Smith,

Benjamin Hall,
Daniel Sullivan,
G. R. Brown,

George Digges,
James Shaw,
J. Parnham,

Nicholas Carrole,
Jos. Gilpin,
Zeph. Turner,

A. C. Hanson,
H. Hollingsworth, Michael Jenifer Stone,

James Tilghman,
John Done,

R. Goldsborough, Jun., John Seney,
Thomas Johnson, Edward Lloyd,

James Hollyday,
Thomas S. Lee, John Stevens,

William Hemslev,

Peter Chaille,
James Martin,
William Morris,
J. Richardson,
William Richardson,
Matt. Driver,

Peter Edmonson, Henry Shryock,
Jaines M Henry,

Thomas Cramphin,
John Coulter,

Richard Thomas,
Thoinas Sprigg,

Williain Deakins, Jun.
John Stull,

Benj. Edwards.
Moses Rawlings,

Attest. Wm. HARWOOD, Clerk.

8. STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA.

In Convention of the people of the state of South Carolina, by their representatives held in the city of Charleston, on Monday the 12th day of May, and continued by divers adjournments to Friday, the 23d day of May, Anno Domini 1788, and in the 12th year of the independence of the United States of America.

The Convention, having maturely considered the Constitution, or form of govern. ment, reported to Congress by the Convention of Delegates from the United States of America, and submitted to them by a resolution of the legislature of this state, passed the 17th and 18th days of February last, in order to forin a more perfect union, es. tablish justice, insure doinestic tranquillity, provide for the common defence, proinote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to the people of the said United States, and their posterity,– Do, in the name and behalf of the people of this state, hereby assent to and ratify the said Constitution. Done in Convention, the 23d day of May, in the year of our Lord 1788, and of the independence of the United States of America the twelfth.

THOMAS PINCKNEY, President. (l. s.] Attest. John SANDFORD Dart, Secrelary.

IL. s.] And whereas it is essential to the preservation of the rights reserved to the several states, and the freedom of the people, under the operations of a general governinent, that the right of prescribing the manner, time, and places, of holding the elections to the federal legislature, should be forever inseparably annexed to the sovereignty of the several states, – This Convention doth declare, that the same ought to reinain, to all posterity, a perpetual and fundamental right in the local, exclusive of the interference of the general government, except in cases where the legislatures of the states shall refuse or neglect to perform and fulfil the same, according to the tenor of the said Constitution.

This Convention doth also declare, that no section or paragraph of the said Consti. tution warrants a construction that the states do not retain every power not expressly relinquished by them, and vested in the general government of the Union.

Resoloed, That the general government of the United States ought never to inipose direct taxes, but where the moneys arising froin the duties, imports, and excise, are insufficient for the public exigencies, nor then until Congress shall have made a requisition upon the states to assess, levy, and pay, their respective proportions of such requisitions; and in case any state shall neglect or refuse to pay its proportion, pursuant to such requisition, then Congress may assess and levy such state's proportion, together with interest thereon, at the rate of six per centum per annum, from the time of payment prescribed by such requisition.

Resolved, That the third section of the sixth article ought to be a gended, by inserting the word "other" between the words “ no" and "religious."

Resolved, That it be a standing instruction to all such delegates as may hereafter be elected to represent this state in the general government, to exert their utmost abilities and influence to effect an alteration of the Constitution, conformably to the aforegoing resolutions. Done in Convention, the 23d day of May, in the year of our Lord 1788, and of the independence of the United States of America ihe twelfth.

THOMAS PINCKNEY, President. [L. 9.] Attest. John SANDFORD Dart, Secretary.

ČL. 8.]

9. STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE.

IN CONVENTION OF THE DELEGATES OF THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF

New HAMPSHIRE, June the 21st, 1788. The Convention having impartially discussed and fully considered the Constitu'ion for the United States of America, reported to Congress by the Convention or

Delegat :s from the United States of America, and submitted to us by a resolution of the General Court of said state, passed the 14th day of December last past, and acknowl edging with g, uteful hearts the goodness of the Supreme Ruler of the universe in atturding the people of the United States, in the course ot his providence, an opportu. nity, deliberately and peaceably, without fraud or surprise, of entering into an explicit and solemn compact with each other, by assenting to and ratifying a new Constitution, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquillity, provide for the common defence, promote the general welfare, and secure the Llessings of liberty to themselves and their posterity, — Do, in the name and behalf of the people of the state of New Hampshire, assent to and ratify the said Constitution for the United States of America. And as it is the opinion of this Convention, that certain amendments and alterations in the said Constitution would remove the fears and quiet the apprehensions of many of the good people of this state, and more eftectually guard against an undue administration of the federal government, — The Convention do therefore recommend that the following alterations and provisions be introduced in the said Constitution :

1. That it be explicitly declared that all powers not expressly and particularly delegated by the aforesaid Constitution are reserved to the several states, to be by them exercised.

11. That there shall be one representative to every thirty thousand persons, according to the census mentioned in the Constitution, until the whole number of repre. sentatives amount to two hundred.

111. That Congress do not exercise the powers vested in them by the fourth sec. tion of the first article but in cases when a slate shall neglect or refuse to inake the regulations therein mentioned, or shall make regulations subversive of the rights of the people to a free and equal representation in Congress ; nor shall Congress in any case make regulations contrary to a free and equal representation.

IV. That Congress do not lay direct laxes but when the moneys arising from impost, excise, and their other resources, are insufficient for the public exigencies, nor then, until Congress shall have first made a requisition upon the states to assess, levy, and pay, their respective proportions of such requisition, agreeably to the census fixed in the said Constitution, in such way and manner as the legislature of the state shall think best; and in such case, if any state shall neglect, then Congress may assess and levy such state's proportion, together with the interest thereon, at the rate of six per cent. per annuin, from the time of payment prescribed in such requisition.

V. That Congress shall erect no coinpany of merchants with exclusive advantages of commerce.

VI. That no person shall be tried for any crime by which he may incur an infamous punishment, or loss of life, until he first be indicted by a grand jury, except in such cases as may arise in the government and regulation of the land and naval forces.

VII. All common-law cases between citizens of different states shall be coinmenced in the coinmon-law courts of the respective slates ; and no appeal shall be allowed to the federal court, in such cases, unless the sum or value of the thing in controversy amount to three thousand dollars.

VIJI. În civil actions between citizens of different states, every issue of fact, arising in actions at common law, shall be tried by jury, if the parties, or either of them, request it.

ix. Congress shall at no time consent that any person, holding an office of trust or profit under the United States, shall accept any title of nobility, or any other title or office, from any king, prince, or foreign state.

X. That no standing army shall be kept up in time of peace, unless with the consent of three fourths of the members of each branch of Congress; nor shall sol. diers, in time of peace, be quartered upon private houses, without the consent of the

XI. Congress shall make no laws touching religion, or to infringe the rights of conscience.

XII. Congress shall never disarm any citizen, unless such as are or have been in actual rebellion.

And the Convention do, in the name and in behalf of the people of this state, enjoin it upon their representatives in Congress, at all times until the alterations and provisions aforesaid have been considered agreeably to the fifth article of the said Constitution, to exert all their influence, and use all reasonable and legal methods, to obtain a ratification of the said alterations and provisions, in such manner as is provided in the article.

And that the United States in Congress assembled may have due notice of the assent and ratification of the said Constitution by this Convention, it is Resolved,

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That the assent and ratification aforesaid be engrossed on parchment, together with the recommendation and injunction aforesaid, and with this resolution; and that John Sullivan, Esq., president of the Convention, and John Langdon, Esq., president of the state, transinit the saine, countersigned by the secretary of Convention, and the secre tary of state, under their hands and seals, to the United States in Congress assembled

JOHN SULLIVAN, Pres. of the Cond. [L. s.]

JOHN LANGDON, Pres. of the Stute. Il. s By order.

John Calf, Secretary of Convention,
Joseph PEARSON, Secretary of Stute.

10. VIRGINIA, to wit. We, the delegates of the people of Virginia, duly elected in pursuance of a recom mendation from the General Assembly, and now met in Convention, having fully and freely investigated and discussed the proceedings of the Federal Convention, and being prepared as well as the most mature deliberation hath enabled us, to decide thereon, Do, in the name and in behalf of the people of Virginia, declare and make known, that the powers granted under the Constitution, being derived froin the people of the United States, may be resumed by thein, whensoever the same shall be perverted to their injury or oppression, and that every power not granted thereby reinains with them, and at their will; that, therefore, no right, of any denomination, can be cancelled, abridged, restrained, or modified, by the Congress, by the Senate or House of Representatives, acting in any capacity, by the President, or any department or officer of the United States, except in those instances in which power is given by the Constitution for those purposes; and that, among other essential rights, the liberty of conscience, and of the press, cannot be cancelled, abridged, restrained, or modified, by any authority of the United States. With these impressions, with a solemn appeal to the Searcher of all hearts for the purity of our intentions, and under the conviction that whatsoever iinperfections may exist in the Constitution ought rather to be examined in the mode prescribed therein, than to bring the Union into danger by a delay with a hope of obtaining amendments previous to the ratifications, - We, the said delegates, in the name and in behalf of the people of Virginia, do, by these presents, assent to and ratify the Constitution recommended, on the 17th day of September, 1787, by the Federal Convention, for the government of the United States, hereby announcing to all those whom it may concern, that the said Constitution is binding upon the said people, according to an authentic copy hereto annexed, in the words following. (See Constitution.]

Done in Convention, this 26th day of June, 1788.
By order of the Convention.

EDÁ. PENDLETON, President. [L. s.] [See DEBATES IN CONVENTION, where the Declaration or Bill of Rights, and Amendments, are printed at large.]

11. STATE OF NEW YORK.

We, the delegates of the people of the state of New York, duly elected and met in Convention, having maturely considered the Constitution for the United States of America, agreed to on the 17th day of September, in the year 1787, by the Convention then assembled at Philadelphia, in the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, (a copy whereof precedes these presents,) and having also seriously and deliberately con. sidered the present situation of the United States, – Do declare and make known,

That all power is originally vested in, and consequently derived from, the people, and that government is instituted by them for their common interest, protection, and security

That the enjoyment of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, are essential rights, which every government ought to respect and preserve.

That the powers of government inay be reassumed by the people whensoever it shall become necessary to their happiness; that every power, jurisdiction, and right, which is not by the said Constitution clearly delegated to the Congress of the United States, or the departments of the government thereof, remains to the people of the several states, or to their respective state governments, to whom they inay have granted the same; and that those clauses in the said Constitution, which declare that Congress shall not have or exercise certain powers, do not imply that Congress is entitled to any powers not given by the said Constitution ; but such clauses are to be construed either as exceptions to certain specified powers, or as inserted merely for greater caution.

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