Pamphlets on Shakespeare: Evans, M. B. Der bestrafte Brudermord; sein Verhältnis zu Shakspere's Hamlet. 1902. Ewig, F. W. Shakespeare's Lucrece. 1899. Field, B. R. Medical thoughts of Shakespeare. 1884. Holleck-Weithmann, F. Zur Quellenfrage von Shakespeares Lustspiel "Much ado about nothing." 1902. Heuser, Julius. Der Coupletreim in Shakespeare's Dramen. 1893. Hoffmann, F. H. Die Beteuerungen in Shakespeare's Dramen. 1894. Halliwell-Phillipps, J. O. Which shall it be? new lamps or old? Shaxpere or Shakespeare. 1879. Halliwell-Phillipps, J. O. New lamps or old. 1880

Capa
1902

No interior do livro

Palavras e frases frequentes

Passagens conhecidas

Página 12 - Not poppy, nor mandragora, Nor all the drowsy syrups of the world, Shall ever medicine thee to that sweet sleep Which thou ow'dst yesterday.
Página 10 - The sixth age shifts Into the lean and slipper'd pantaloon, With spectacles on nose and pouch on side; His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide For his shrunk shank ; and his big manly voice, Turning again toward childish treble, pipes And whistles in his sound: Last scene of all, That ends this strange eventful history, Is second childishness and mere oblivion, Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.
Página 3 - tis true, this god did shake ; His coward lips did from their colour fly, And that same eye whose bend doth awe the world Did lose his lustre ; I did hear him groan ; Ay, and that tongue of his that bade the Romans Mark him and write his speeches in their books, Alas ! it cried 'Give me some drink, Titinius,
Página 6 - Tis given out that, sleeping in my orchard, A serpent stung me ; so the whole ear of Denmark Is by a forged process of my death Rankly abused : but know, thou noble youth, The serpent that did sting thy father's life Now wears his crown.
Página 9 - Cheated of feature by dissembling nature, Deform'd, unfinish'd, sent before my time Into this breathing world, scarce half made up, And that so lamely and unfashionable, That dogs bark at me, as I halt by them...
Página 22 - Let it be so! thy truth then be thy dower! For, by the sacred radiance of the sun, The mysteries of Hecate and the night; By all the operation of the orbs From whom we do exist and cease to be...
Página 20 - New Lamps or Old? A Few Additional Words on the Momentous Question Respecting the E and the A in the name of Our National Dramatist.
Página 11 - With juice of cursed hebenon in a vial, And in the porches of mine ears did pour The leperous distilment; whose effect Holds such an enmity with blood of man, That, swift as quicksilver, it courses through The natural gates and alleys of the body ; And, with a sudden vigour, it doth posset And curd, like eager droppings into milk, The thin and wholesome blood...
Página 10 - The Orator : Handling a hundred severall Discourses, in forme of Declamations : Some of the Arguments being drawne from Titus Livius and other ancient Writers, the rest of the authors owne invention : Part of which are of matters happened in our Age. Written in French by Alexander Silvayn, and Englished by LP [Lazarus Piot, a nom de guerre of Anthony Munday's] London.

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