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Notable Books Published during 1900 by THE MACMILLAN COMPANY

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ADAMS.- America's Economic Supremacy. By BROOKS ADAMS.

Cloth, 12mo, $1.25. ALLEN.-The Reign of Law. A TALE

OF THE KENTUCKY HEMP FIELDS. By JAMES LANE ALLEN, author of "The Choir Invisible." Illustrated by HARRY EARL and J. C. Fexx.

Cloth, 12mo, $1.50. APRIL BABY'S Book of Tunes (The).

WITH THE STORY OF HOW THEY CANE TO BR WRITTEN, By the author of “Elizabeth and hes German Garden," etc.

Cloth, square 16mo, $1.50 net. BAILEY.-Cyclopedia of American

Horticulture. By L. H. BAILEY, Cornell
University, assisted by WILLIAM MILLER
and many Expert Cultivators and Botanists.
To be complete in four volumes. Over 2,000
Original Illustrations. Vols. I. and II. now

ready. Each cloth, imperial 8vo, $5.00 net. CLARKE. - The Distribution of

Wealth. A TABORY OF WAGES, INTEREST, AND PROFITS. By PROF. JOHN BATES CLARKE, Columbia University.

Cloth, 8vo, $3.00. CRAWFORD. - In the Palace of the

King. A LOVE STORY OF OLD MADRID. By F. MARION CRAWFORD, author of " Saracinesca,' " etc. Illustrated by FRED ROE.

Cloth, 12mo, $1.50. The Rulers of the South: SICILY,

CALABRIA, AND Malta, Superbly illustrated by HENRY BROKMAX. With photogravure plates and nearly 100 smaller cuts in the text. In two volumes.

Cloth, crown 8vo, $6.00 net. DOUGLAS.- Fra Angelico. By LANGTON DOUGLAS. Over 60 illustrations.

Cloth, 8vo, $5.00. EARLE.-Stage Coach and Tavern

Days. A companion to “Home Life in Colonial Days" and other social and Domestic Histories. By MRS. ALICE MORSE EARLE. Profusely illustrated.

Cloth, crown 8vo, $2.50. FRICKER.— The Antarctic Regions.

By DR. KARL FRICKER.
plates, and illustrations in the text.

Cloth, 8vo, $3.00. GATES.-Studies and Appreciations. By LEWIS E. GATES, Harvard University.

Cloth, 12mo, $1.50. GIDDINGS. – Democracy and Em

pire, WITH STUDIES OF THEIR PSYCHOLOGICAL, ECONOMIC, AND MORAL FOUNDATIONS. By FRANKLIN HENRY GIDDINGS, Co

lumbia University. Cloth, 8vo, $2.50. GOODNOW. - Politics and Adminis

tration. A STUDY IN GOVERNMENT. By, FRANK J. GOODNOW, Columbia University.

Cloth, 12mo, $1.50. GOODSPEED. - Israel's Messianic

Hope in the Time of Jesus. A Study in the Historical Development of the Foreshadowings of the Christ in the Old Testament and Beyond. Cloth, 12mo, $1.50.

ORMOND. — Foundations of Knowl

edge. In Three Parts. By ALEXANDER T. ORMOND, Princeton University.

Cloth, 8vo, $3.00. PEABODY. - Jesus Christ and the

Social Question. An Examination of the Teaching of Jesus in Relation to Some of the Problems of Social Life. By FRANCIS GREENWOOD PEABODY, Harvard University.

Cloth, 12mo, $1.50. PEARSON. - The Grammar of Sci

ence. By KARL PEARSON. Second edi.

tion, revised and enlarged. Cloth, $2.50. REINSCH. - World Politics AT THE

END OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY, as Influenced by the Oriental Situation. By PAUL 8. REINSCH, University of Wisconsin. Citizens' Library.

Cloth, $1.25. RHODES. — History of the United

HAND-BOOKS OF THE NEW TESTA

MENT.
BACON.-An Introduction to the

Books of the New Testament. By
BENJAMIN W. BACON, D.D., Yale

University, Cloth, 12mo, 75 cts.
GOULD. – The Biblical Theology

of the New Testament. By EZRA P.

GOULD. Cloth, 12mo, 75 cts. net.
NASH. — The History of the

Higher Criticism of the New Tes-
tament. By HENRY S. NASH, Prot-
estant Episcopal Divinity School, Cam-
bridge.

Cloth, 12mo, 75 cts.
HARRISON.- Tennyson, Ruskin,

Mill, and Other Literary Estimates.
By FREDERIC HARRISON.

Cloth, 8vo, $2.00.
HAZLITT.– The Venetian Republic.

Its Rise, Its GROWTH, AND ITS FALL, 4211797. By W. CAREW HAZLITT.

Cloth, 8vo, $12.00. HEWLETT. - The Life and Death

of Richard Yea and Nay. By MAURICE HEWLETT, author of "The Forest Lovers."

Cloth, 12mo, $1.50. HOLLS. -- The Peace Conference at

the Hague, AND ITS BEARINGS ON INTERNATIONAL LAW AND Policy. By FRED

ERICK W. HOLLS, D.C.L. Cloth, 8vo, $3,
JOHNSON.— Along French Byways.

By CLIFTON JOHNSON, author of "Among
English Hedgerows." Illustrated.

Cloth, crown 8vo, $2.50.
LEE.-Historical Jurisprudence. An

INTRODUCTION TO THE SYSTEMATIC STUDY
OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF LAW. By GUY
CARLETON LEE, Johns Hopkins Univer-
sity.

Cloth, 8vo, $3.00 net.
LEIGHTON. - Frederic Lord Leigh-

ton, Late President of the Royal
Academy of Arts. Ax ILLUSTRATED
RECORD OF HIS LIFE AND WORK. By ERNEST
RHYS.

Cloth, crown 8vo, $3.00.
MABIE.- William Shakespeare,

POET, DRAMATIST, AND Max. By HAMIL-
TON W. MABIE. Profusely illustrated.

Ooze calf, crown 8vo, $6.00.
MORRIS. – The History of Coloniza-

tion, FROM THE EARLIEST TIMES TO THE PRESENT Dar. By HENRY C. MORRIS. In two volumes.

Cloth, 8vo, $4.00.
NATIONAL STUDIES IN AMERICAN

LETTERS.
ADDISON.—The Clergy in Amer-

ican Life and Letters. By DANIEL

D. ADDISON. Cloth, 12mo, $1.25. NICHOLSON.-The Hoosiers. By MEREDITH NICHOLSON.

Cloth, 12mo, $1.25. SWIFT. - Brook Farm, ITS MEM

BERS, SCHOLARS, AND VISITORS. By

LINDSEY SWIFT. Cloth, 12mo, $1.25.
OPPENHEIM. - The Care of the

Child in Health. By NATHAN OPPEN-
HEIM, Mt. Sinai Hospital.

Cloth, 12mo, $1.25.

States After the Compromise of 1850. By JAMES FORD RHODES. Four volumes.

Cloth, 8vo, $10.00.
SEARS. An Outline of Political

Growth in the Nineteenth century.
By EDMUND SEARS, St. Mary Institute,
St. Louis.

Cloth, 8vo, $3.00 net.
STATESMAN'S YEAR-BOOK.-Sta-

tistical and Historical Annual of the States of the World for the Year 1900. Edited by J. SCOTT KELTIE.

Cloth, 12mo, $3.00 net. STEEL. - The Hosts of the Lord.

By Mrs. FLORA ANNIE STEEL, author "On the face of the Waters."

Cloth, 12mo, $1.50.
STODDARD. – The Evolution of the

English Novel. By FRANCIS H. STOD.
DARD, New York University.

Cloth, 12mo, $1.50.
TEMPLE PRIMERS (THE).-A series

of small volumes of condensed information introductory to great subjects, written by leading authorities, offering a wide range for individual selection. Send for a circular. The 15 volumes now ready on Scientific, Historical, and Literary Subjects.

Each cloth, 18mo, 40 cts, net. VAN DYCK. - Anthony Van Dyck.

AN HISTORICAL STUDY OF HIS LIFE AND WORKS. By LIONEL CUST, Director of the National Portrait Gallery, London.

Imperial 8vo, $35.00.
WICKHOFF. - Roman Art. SOME OF

Its PRINCIPLES AND THEIR APPLICATION TO
EARLY CHRISTIAN PAINTING. By FRANZ
WICKHOFF. Translated by Mrs. S. A.

STRONG. Illustrated. Cloth, 8vo, $8.00.
WOODBERRY. — Makers of Liter-

ature. Essays by GEORGE EDWARD WOODBERRY, Columbia University.

Cloth, 12mo, $1.50. WRIGHT. - The Dream Fox Story

Book. By MABEL OSGOOD WRIGHT, author of “Tommy Anne," etc. Illustrated by OLIVER HERFORD. Cloth, 16mo, $1.50.

With maps,

THE MACMILLAN COMPANY, 66 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK

TWO OF D. APPLETON & CO.'S

MOST NOTABLE BOOKS

A Masterpiece of Biography

Life and Letters of Thomas Henry Huxley

By his son, LEONARD HUXLEY

In Two Volumes. Ilustrated. 8vo, cloth, 549 & 547 pp., with Index.

Price, $5.00 net.

The most important addition made to biographical literature in this decade.

- NEW YORK HERALD. “ An admirable biography.LONDON SPECTATOR. “ A full-length picture of a remarkable man.”— NEW YORK MAIL AND EXPRESS. Destined to take high rank among epistolary autobiographies.— THE DIAL, CHICAGO.

The work is rich in personal literary, social, and scientific interest, while as a biography it is fascinating and valuable.NEW YORK OBSERVER.

Mr. Garland's Best Work

THE EAGLE'S HEART

A Story of the West

By HAMLIN GARLAND

12mo, cloth, 369 pp. Price, $1.50. Displays sincerity and rugged strength.Chicago RECORD. The variety of the story is as noticeable as its vigor and dramatic power.

New Haven PALLADIUM. Original, inspiring, and full of humanity.— SPRINGFIELD UNION. Racy of the West."- DETROIT FREE PRESS. “ A splendid achievement.— NEW YORK MAIL AND EXPRESS. “ The Eagle's Heart' ist ein Buch welches über alle gleichartigen hervorragt."

TOLEDO EXPRESS.

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D. APPLETON & COMPANY, PUBLISHERS, NEW YORK

THE DIAL

A Semi-Monthly Journal of Literary Criticism, Discussion, and Information.

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THE DIAL (founded in 1880) is published on the 1st and 16th of each month. TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION, $2.00 a year in advance, postage

THE GREAT BOOKS OF THE prepaid in the United States, Canada, and Mexico; in other countries

CENTURY. comprised in the Postal Union, 50 cents a year for extra postage must be added. Unless otherwise ordered, subscriptions will begin with the On this first day of the twentieth century current number. REMITTANCES should be by draft, or by express or

there can be no subject more suitable for dispostal order, payable to THE DIAL. SPECIAL RATES TO Clubs and for subscriptions with other publications will be sent on application;

cussion in the pages of a literary journal than and SAMPLE COPY on receipt of 10 cents. ADVERTISING RATES furnished that of the famous books produced during the on application. All communications should be addressed to

century just ended. The subject is one that THE DIAL, Fine Arts Building, Chicago.

has already received a certain amount of atten

tion in other quarters, and that will doubtless No. 349. JAN. 1, 1901. Vol. XXX.

be handled by many sorts of pens during the

coming months. It is a subject of deep and CONTENTS.

enduring interest, because it affords one way,

at least, and probably the most important way, THE GREAT BOOKS OF THE CENTURY

5

of determining what the nineteenth century has THE CASE AT STANFORD UNIVERSITY

7

done for civilization. We propose to confine

our attention, in the present article, to the COMMUNICATIONS

8

books of thought as distinguished from the Poe and the Hall of Fame. Kate W. Beaver.

books of art, and to enumerate, with some sort A Discredited Museum of Etruscan Archæology. F. B. Tarbell.

of brief accompanying comment, some of the Reading Shakespeare as a Duty. H. M. Stanley. works of the century that may fairly be char

acterized as epoch-making; the books, in a LETTER-WRITER AND POET. E. G. J.

word, that have opened men's eyes to a deeper CHRISTIANITY IN AMERICA BEFORE COLUM- view of scientific or philosophical truth, and BUS. Edwin Erle Sparks .

12 have made permanent changes in the current

of human thought. TWO BOOKS ON BANKING. Frederick W. Gookin 13

Considered in this respect, the book of the FINDING A FRESH LAND. Wallace Rice

15 century, beyond any possibility of a successful RECENT RELIGIOUS DISCUSSIONS. John Bascom 17 challenge to its preeminence, is “ The Origin

, Pfleiderer's Evolution and Theology, and Other

of Species,” by Charles Darwin. The influence Essays.- Dole's Religion of a Gentleman.-Askwith's

of this book ranks it with the treatises of CoThe Christian Conception of Holiness. — Granger's pernicus and of Newton, with the “ Contrat The Soul of a Christian. – Watson's The Doctrines Social ” and the “ Wealth of Nations." It is of Grace. – Haeckel's The Riddle of the Universe.

doubtful if any other book, in all the history of Carus's Whence and Whither.

modern thought, has been so far-reaching in BRIEFS ON NEW BOOKS

its influence, or productive of such immense Some notable bibliographical work on Dante. intellectual results. There is a difference, not Short lives of three great Americans. — The story of a tramp in England. - Mr. Hearn's “Shadowings

merely of degree but almost of kind, between of Japan. – Tales of a zoophilist. — The Psalms as the intellectual processes of the men who lived poetry. — “A Garden of Simples.” – Huxley as a before Darwin and those who have grown to leader in science. - Retaliating on Mr. Kipling. - A manhood during the period in which the evobook of pleasant fancies. — A new volume of “Na

lutionary leaven has been working in men's ture's Miracles." — Views of the Grand Cañon. Love letters of a musician.

minds. We no longer think in the same terms

as of old, and we see that the true measure of BRIEFER MENTION.

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the power of the great thinkers of the past is NOTES

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to be found in the extent to which their work

foreshadowed or anticipated the evolutionary TOPICS IN LEADING PERIODICALS .

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method. LIST OF NEW BOOKS

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thus extended far beyond the biological field cism of sources and ideas, has triumpbed so in which his work was done that his most completely that little in the way of superstition famous book stands thus preëminent. Among is left for it to slay. Many men have fought the books that have proved epoch-making in valiantly in this cause, and it is difficult to more restricted fields of thought, we may men. specify individual scholars. But if our test tion Lyell's “Principles of Geology,” Helm- be that of direct influence upon great numbers holtz’s “ Tonempfindungen, Froebel's “ Edu- of people, it is probably true that the “ Leben

” cation of Man,” Ruskin's “Modern Painters,” | Jesu" of Strauss and the “ Vie de Jésus of and Maine's “ Ancient Law.” The science of Renan have been the most important popular comparative philology, which hardly existed agencies in bringing about a restoration of the before the nineteenth century, dates from the Christian religion to its proper place in the publication of Bopp's “Comparative Gram- perspective of general history. mar”; and the scientific pursuit of historical In the domain of economics, the most influscholarship, whose ideals are very different ential book of the century has probably been from those of the eighteenth century histo- one whose teachings are repudiated by those rians, although Gibbon did much to anticipate who have the best right to speak in the name them, really began with the publication of of this science. The propaganda of socialism Niebuhr's “Römische Geschichte." Dalton's has become so marked a feature in the political “New System of Chemical Philosophy" laid life of most of the civilized nations that it can. the foundations for atomic chemistry, and the not be ignored in any survey of the tendencies

Mécanique Céleste” of Laplace provided a of nineteenth century thought, and credit must firm mathematical basis for the nebular theory, be given to the book which, more than any previously outlined, it is true, by Kant, but other, has been responsible for this movement. lacking in the confirmation that was brought That book, it need hardly be added, is the to it by the masterly analysis of the French “Kapital" of Karl Marx; and its force is astronomer. Here is also the appropriate place not yet spent.

not yet spent. Indeed, we are inclined to for mention of the researches of Pasteur, which think that fifty years hence it will loom have proved so immensely fruitful in the do- even larger than it now does among the writmain of bacteriology, and upon which, more ings that have most profoundly influenced the than upon the labors of any other investi- thought of modern times. For the socialist gator, the new science is based. To the experiment has not yet worked itself out, and work of Pasteur and his followers we owe it will not be discredited until civilization has the first rational theory of disease and its suffered

some very rude shocks. Mill's treatment that has ever been formulated, a “ Political Economy,” on the other hand, somewhat surprising fact when we consider while it has profoundly influenced the real the paramount importance of the subject to thinkers in this field, and has an absolute value mankind.

far exceeding that of “ Das Kapital,” falls What were once supposed to be the founda- short of being an epoch-making book for the tions of religious belief have, during the cen- simple reason that, instead of setting new tury just ended, been sapped and mined by ideas in motion, its energy was devoted to many agencies. The study of ancient civiliza- clarifying the old ones, and to setting them tions has proved to be the merest fables many forth in logical arrangement. It is still the things that the credulous earlier ages accepted best single treatise on political economy that without question. The new scientific view of has ever been written, and for this, at least, it man and nature has also brought about a silent deserves an honorable place in any review of transformation in many matters of opinion the intellectual history of the nineteenth cenonce thought to be indissolubly connected with tury. We are inclined to give a place in this religious belief, but now seen to have little or connection to the writings upon political and nothing to do with it. As far as religion is a social subjects of the great apostle of Italian. question of the interpretation of the Scriptures, unity, Guiseppe Mazzini. It is not merely the historical methods that have dealt so effect- because they brought about the political regenively with Greek and Roman tradition have eration of his own country that these writings also made an enduring impression upon the are of the highest importance — although that traditions of the Hebrew people and of the would suffice to justify the estimate — but Christian church. The “higher” criticism, rather because they brought the element of which means simply the new historical criti. I spirituality into the discussions with which

We are

they were concerned, and supplemented the period, although now, at the end of the period,

, conception of the rights of man, of which we see that the former is a waning influence, something too much had been made during while the latter is an influence still to be taken the period that followed the French Revolution, into account in any study of the forces which with the hitherto neglected conception of the still sway the minds of thoughtful men. It duties of man, thus giving an ethical turn to supplies, better than any other metaphysical the general movement of European emancipa. system yet produced, the needed corrective for tion, and allying it with something higher and

that material view of the universe which would finer than merely material interests. The seem to be the outcome of modern science, and teaching of Mazzini, enforced by the singular enforces the fundamental teachings of the purity and nobility of his devoted life, has had philosophers — of Plato, and Spinoza, and a widespread influence upon political thought, Berkeley, and Kant — in the terms of the

, and bas given it an ethical impulse that would modern intellect, and with a cogency that is be difficult to overestimate.

irresistible to the logical mind. Turning last of all to the philosophers, that inclined to believe that if the “ ,

Origin of is, to the men who, as far as may be, take all Species ” is approached in its influence upon knowledge for their province, and seek to sys- nineteenth-century thought by any other one tematize the various results of special intel- book, “ Die Welt als Wille und Vorstellectual activity, we find the names of Humboldt, lung" is that book.

, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Comte, and Mr. Herbert Spencer to be the conspicuous names of the nineteenth century.

The "Kosmos" of Alexander von Humboldt marks, in a sense,

THE CASE AT STANFORD the end of the period of general scholarship

UNIVERSITY. and the beginning of the period in which The recent case of alleged "interference with specialization has held full sway. Never the freedom of academic teaching ” at Stanford again can anyone hope to master the scientific University bas called out a range of discussion and knowledge of his time in the sense in which criticism that seems to us disproportionate to the Humboldt mastered it; even the magnificent importance of the case. It was, of course, to be achievement of Mr. Spencer falls short of that

expected that the matter would be made the most ideal and shows the futility of any further en

of by sensation-seeking newspapers, and those of

California in particular seem to have improved deavor in that direction. We owe to Mr. Spencer the most thorough-going application of equities or to the injury they might be doing the

their opportunities without much regard to the finer the conception of evolution to history that has institution and those who have made it one of the ever been made, and that is glory enough for chief glories of their State. Into the details of the one man ; but we cannot read his “ Synthetic affair we do not now propose to go. Broadly Philosophy ” without at the same time realizing viewed, it seems less a question of academic freethat there are gaps in his knowledge and de

dom than of academic common-sense. fects in his philosophical comprehension. We

that an instructor was asked to resign his position, have the same feeling in more marked degree

as he claims, on account of some sentiments, uttered when we read Comte; and in his case, while

by him in a public speech, which were objectionable recognizing bis great influence, we must admit

to the founder of the University; as the other side

claims, on account of an antagonism of long standthat it is an influence no longer active. Even ing, aggravated by some offensive references to the the eloquence of Mr. Frederic Harrison cannot family of the founder, the instructor questioning in galvanize the “Cours de Philosophie Positive"

his class-room the legitimacy of the fortune by into any semblance of the life that left it a which the University had been established, while generation ago. Nevertheless, it will always not scrupling to accept a portion of the same forbe reckoned among the most influential books tune in payment of his professorial salary. Now of the century just ended. Taking philosophy if these things were true, or Mrs. Stanford believed in the stricter sense, as primarily concerned

them to be true, her resentment was natural and with the ultimate problems of thought, the

inevitable; and in any event, it seems to us that. names of Hegel and of Schopenhauer stand

such generous devotion and boundless liberality as

she has shown to the institution whose welfare lies preëminent in the bistory of the nineteenth

80 near her heart might fairly have entitled her to century. The “ Logic" of the one and Die

more considerate and more kindly treatment than Welt als Wille und Vorstellung” of the other she has received from some quarters. We do not have been the chief metaphysical forces of the believe, from all we know of this case, that the

It appears

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