HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES

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Índice

THE RELATIONS OF THE TWO NEW POWEBS 1778
94
Charles Augustus of SaxeWeimar 95 Goethe and the class
100
Anxious as to the Bavarian succession 105 Makes approaches
109
His opinion of Englands position after the defeat of Burgoyne 113
115
Bunker Hill 120 In retreating to Halifax 120 On Long Island 121
121
Divides his army 121His waste of time 121His winter in Philadel
122
Intrigue of Lee 127 Washington pursues the British army 128
129
Dismissed by Congress 134 Character 134 Death 134 Carvers
135
Change in the American mind 140 In the English mind 140 Opin
141
Congress receives the French minister 147Sullivan lands on Rhode
148
Their menaces 151Their conduct condemned in the house of commons
151
CHAPTER VI
157
Admiral Keppel captures a French frigate 162 DOrvilliers sent out
164
feited by the British 168 Loan Offices 169 Lottery 169 Forced cir
170
the Americans 176Impracticable plan for emancipating Canada 176
176
He observes the attachment of the United States to England
182
Gouverneur Morris 183 Of Jay 183 Vergennes on the American gov
189
Clark at Redstone 194At Louisville 195Schemes of Hamilton
196
Further merits of the backwoodsmen 201 Expedition under Evan Shelby
202
dition of the officers 205 Of the rank and file 205 Congress fixes the num
211
sissippi
212
Congress refers the terms of peace to a committee 213 Report of
217
CHAPTER XXIII
222
Matthews predatory expedition 223 Retaliation of the Virginia legisla
226
the country of the Onondagas 230 Sullivan appointed to command
231
American independence fixed 235 America will establish a strong gov
239
At East Haven 226 At Fairfield 226 At Norwalk 227 Address
241
British cabinet seeks aid from Russia 241 Report of the English ambas
245
Combined fleet disperses 250 Dejection in France 250 Maria Theresa
252
THE ARMED NEUTRALITY 17781780
255
merce from the American commissioners 261 Neglect and silence of
264
Conflicting aggressions of France and England in the Netherlands
270
Autograph letter of George III to Catharine 273 Harris offers
281
THE WAR IN THE SOUTHERN STATES 17781779
283
His previous life 287 Movements of the new commander 287 Repulse
293
Arrival of Byron with reenforcements 295 Running fight between
299
Draft of a plan of government 362 Disfranchisement 362 Work
362
Its convention declares the state a free republic 364 Committee to draft
368
Retreat of the British 374 Committee of congress in camp 374 Clinton
374
Clinton embarks troops 383 Andre on board the Vulture
383
History of West Point 385 Interview of Washington with Rochambeau
392
STRIVING FOR UNION 17791781
399
great officers of state 412 Belies to excess on a bank of the United States
413
Comparison of France and the United States 418 Measure to enable
423
His answer to the complaints of the Dutch 426 Mariotts
431
Yorke presents Stormonts memorial 436 Its reception by the Dutch
437
of Stormont for the punishment of the Amsterdam offenders 438
438
CHAPTER XVII
441
Neckers letter to Lord North 444 Vergennes on Necker
444
Americas need of money 446 Advice of Washington 446 Complaints
452
THE SOUTHERN CAMPAIGN BATTLE OF GUILFORD COURTHOUSE
468
Junction of the American army at Guilford courthouse 472 Greenes
474
Pickens routs a body of loyalists under Pyle 474 Cornwallis strives
480
to Germain 484 Germain instructs Clinton to further the plan of a cam
485
Greene at the high hills of Santee 493Rawdon sails for England
492
ette detached to Virginia 497 Arrival of Phillips with reenforcements
498
Instructions to the American commissioners 502 Madison on reforming
504
remonstrates against a defensive campaign 509 Asks leave to retire
510
apeake appointed a rendezvous for the sea and land forces 513 Clinton
517
of Cornwallis 522Share of the French in the siege 523 Troops
523
house of commons against continuing the American war 529 Burke con
531
Oswald appointed agent 536His credentials from Shelburne to Frank
537
Rockinghams ministry assents to American independence 1782
538
victory of Rodney over De Grasse 545 It reconciles England to peace
545
CHAPTER XXVIII
551
Vergennes ignorant of the American conditions 556 Fitzherbert sent
557
covers Georgia 563 His conduct at Sharon 563 Evacuation of Savan
567
Morriss budget for 1783 571 Proposal of Madison to empower congress
573
tons opinion 578 Agitation of the king 578 Jay and De Aranda 679
583
Compromise as to the loyalists 690 The coast fisheries 590The
589
The boundary marked on maps 591 Character of the treaty 591
600

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Página 365 - All men are born free and equal, and have certain natural, essential, and unalienable rights; among which may be reckoned the right of enjoying and defending their lives and liberties; that of acquiring, possessing, and protecting property; in fine, that of seeking and obtaining their safety and happiness.
Página 225 - That no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested, or burthened in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief; but that all men shall be free to profess, and by argument to maintain, their opinions in matters of religion, and that the same shall in no wise diminish, enlarge, or affect their civil capacities.
Página 361 - ... hath made of one blood all nations of men for to dwell on the face of the earth...
Página 224 - ... truth is great and will prevail if left to herself, that she is the proper and sufficient antagonist to error, and has nothing to fear from the conflict, unless by human interposition disarmed of her natural weapons, free argument and debate, errors ceasing to be dangerous when it is permitted freely to contradict them.
Página 357 - Nothing is more certainly written in the book of fate, than that these people are to be free ; nor is it less certain that the two races, equally free, cannot live in the same government.
Página 529 - I congratulate you, as the friend of America ; I trust, as not the enemy of England ; I am sure, as the friend of mankind, on the resolution of the house of commons, carried by a majority of nineteen at two o'clock this morning, in a very full house. It was the declaration of two hundred and thirty-four ; I think it was the opinion of the whole.
Página 413 - States and be settled and formed into distinct republican States, which shall become members of the Federal Union and have the same rights of sovereignty, freedom and independence as the other States...
Página 389 - It is no less, sir, in a confidence of the generosity of your mind, than on account of your superior station, that I have chosen to importune you with this letter. I have the honor to be with great respect, sir, Your Excellency's most obedient and most humble servant, John Andre, Adjutant General.
Página 390 - The Board having maturely considered these facts, do also report to his Excellency General Washington, that Major Andre, adjutant general to the British army, ought to be considered as a spy from the enemy, and that agreeable to the law and usage of nations, it is their opinion he ought to suffer death.
Página 395 - Poor Andre suffers to-day; everything that is amiable in virtue, in fortitude, in delicate sentiment, and accomplished manners pleads for him ; but hard-hearted policy calls for a sacrifice. He must die — I send you my account of Arnold's affair, and to justify myself to your sentiments, I must inform you, that I urged a compliance with Andre's request...

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