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TO THE TEACHER.

THE

THE first six lessons are introductory and are somewhat

outside of the range of analysis, strictly so called. They are, however, in the author's view, essential to a thorough grasp of the subject, and nothing but want of time should justify their omission. They may be omitted, if they must be, and the study of the subject may begin with Lesson VII. ; or, they may be studied last of all. The first thought was to add them as an appendix, but from the consideration that this position might consign them to entire neglect they have been placed at the beginning.

The author deprecates a final judgment of the merits of these lessons from the teacher's opinion of the value of the notation for sentences given. This is incidental—not essential. It has seemed to him a simple and convenient way of representing sentences to the eye ; but it can be modified or entirely discarded by the individual teacher ; or, any one can substitute his own system of diagrams for this notation.

The analysis here presented does not at all depend on this device for formulating sentences.

The material for practice is meant to be ample and varied. If the quantity of practice required is too great for any given class, selections may be made. The selection of sentences and paragraphs has been made with great care, and it is thought that these will give opportunity of studying all ordinary kinds of sentences and combinations of gram.

matical elements.

It will be seen that the whole subject is developed from the basis of the PROPOSITION. Let the pupil learn this fundamental lesson thoroughly, with the assurance that there can be no real analysis of sentences without it; this is the key to the whole doctrine of sentences.

LESSON

XXIII.--The Objective Element : Objects of Kindred Mean-

ing...

93

XXIV.–The Objective Element: Some Additional Objects.. 95

XXV.-Recapitulation of Objective Elements.

98

XXVI.-General Review from Lesson XVI....

99

XXVII.—The Infinitive Mode as a Grammatical Element. 101

XXVIII.—Ohjective Complements Completed...,

107

XXIX.–Tbe Infinitive Mode without a Subject. . .

111

XXX. - General Practice in Analyzing Sentences containing

Infinitive Phrases, Objects with Attributes, and

Phrases of Verbal Completion..

113

XXXI.—Connectives : their Kinds, and General Division... 115

XXXII. --Pure or Coördinate Conjunctions...

117

XXXIII. —Compound Elements. .

120

XXXIV.–Subordinate Connectives.

123

XXXV.-Classification of Sentences.

127

XXXVI.—Notation for Representing Compound and Complex

Sentences to the Eye......

132

XXXVII.—General Directions for Analysis. .

139

XXXVIII.—Complex Sentences: Adjective Clauses..

141

XXXIX.—Complex Sentences : Adjective Clauses continued. 146

XL.-Complex Sentences : Substantive Clauses..

147

XLI.—Complex Sentences : Temporal Clauses.

152

XLII.-Complex Sentences : Local Clauses....

155

XLIII.—Complex Sentences : Clauses Denoting Manner.... 157

XLIV.-General Exercise on the Elements Presented so Far 159

XLV.-Complex Sentences : Causal Clauses.

162

XLVI.—Complex Sentences : Final Clauses.

166

XLVII.—Complex Sentences : Conditional Clauses..

169

XLVIII.—Complex Sentences: Concessive and Adversative

Clauses...

173

XLIX.—Complex Sentences : Clauses Denoting Comparison 175

L.-Some Adverbial Phrase-Elements....

181

LI.—Review of Last Six Lessons.

187

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