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and an interesting little volume on “Kashmiri Proverbs," by J. H. Knowles, which was published at Bombay in 1885.

In 1890 there was issued at Colombo a good collection of Sinhalese and European proverbs by N. Mendis, and in 1897 Mr. H. Jensen produced his “ Tamil Proverbs,” which contains much that has its counterpart in our own proverbial lore relating to woman ; while Mr. W. F. Johnson's “Hindi Proverbs” (1886) further largely adds to the estimate formed of the fair sex.

Mr. A. H. Smith's “ Chinese Proverbs” is excellent as far as it goes, and Mr. Pfoundes, in his “Notes," has collected many of the Japanese proverbs. Herr Knobloch, too, in the “ Transactions of the German Society of Japan," has done much in this direction, whilst Sir Edward J. Reed's important work on “ Japan : its History, Traditions, and Religions” (1880, 2 vols.) has devoted a chapter to the proverbs and proverbial sayings current among the Japanese people, in many of which he says, ,

“there is in the original a play upon words which cannot be translated, but which sharpens the point of the phrase to the native”-a remark, however, which applies to most translations of foreign proverbs. When we turn to Japanese wisdom relative to woman's beauty, we find much the same advice given as is found amongst Western nations, one of their popular admonitions renrinding us that “the heart is better than a beautiful face"—in other words, it is far better for a woman to have a good heart than to have a be' utiful face ; and the danger that often lurks behind a pretty face has been incorporated into many of their proverbs, one of which runs thus : “Beware of beautiful women as you would of red pepper”; and, it may be added, even the Japanese have long ago commented in their proverbial lore on woman's loquacity, one of their household maxims reaffirming what, under one form or another, seems to be universally acknowledged—that “a woman's tongue three inches long can kill a man six feet high.'

Among some of the other works to which we have been more or less indebted in the succeeding pages may be mentioned the following: J. Christian's “Behar Proverbs”; A. Manwaring's “Marathi Proverbs”; “Telugu Proverbs,” by Narasimha Acharyulu; “Sindhi Proverbs,” by Rochiram Gajumal ;

English Proverbs, with Urdu Equivalents,” by Wazir Ahmad ; “Osmanli Proverbs,” by Ahmad Midhat (1898); and W. E. Taylor's “African Aphorisms (1891).

T. F. THISELTON-DYER.

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