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Chudrew Clarke

PASSIVE VOICE.
PRESENTS FOLLOW PRESENTS.

(1.)

? Quis ametur.
.

Who is loved.

» Quis amatus sit.

Who was or has been loved.

Rogo, ........ ... I ask.
Rogavi,.......... I have asked.
Rogabo,... ..I shall ask.

(2.) in
Rogo, ........... I ask.
Rogavi,... ....... I have asked.
Rogabo, ........ I shall ask.

(3.)
Rogo, .. ..........I ask.
Rogavi, ... ... ... I have asked.
Rogabo, ......... I shall ask.

(4.)
Rogo, ........ ...I ask.
Rogavi, ..........I have asked.
Rogabo,.. ... ... I shall ask.

Num futurum sit ut puer ametur.

If the boy will be loved.

) Num futurum fuerit ut puer amaretur.

If the boy would have been loved.

maretur.

PASTS FOLLOW PASTS.
(1.)
Rogavi,.... .... I asked.

Quis amaretur.
Rogabam, .......I was asking
Rogaveram, ... I had asked. Who was loved.

(2.)
Rogavi,........ I asked.

Quis amatus esset.
Rogabam, ....... I was asking.
Rogaveram,.... I had asked. Who had been loved.

(3.)

Num futurum esset ut puer amaretur.

If the boy would be loved.

Rogavi,.......... I asked.
Rogabam,..... I was asking.
Rogaveram,.... I had asked.

(4.)
Rogavi,.......... I asked.
Rogabam, ....... I was asking
Rogaveram,... I had asked.

Num futurum fuerit ut puer amaretur.
If the boy would have been loved.

ISES

William Banach A.A. HD.
1. Rector y abert, Greinen Schil

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Dublin-Dublinum. Prince of Orange-Princeps Arausie.

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liam Barrach M.A. D. cic. 1865 Rector of abween Grammar Schot Rector Relisingsre Academy Sangen,

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GRAMMAR SCHOOL, ABERDEEN.

Visitation Exercise— fifth Class.

Wednesday, Oct. 24. Time, 1 hour.

To be written without Dictionaries, Books, or Notes of any kind.

James took leave of them * with a speech which did him little honour. He had often, he said, been warned that Irishmen, however well they might look, would never acquit themselves well on a field of battle ; and he had now found that the warning was but too true. . . . . . . . . . He knew, he said, that some of his adherents had declared that they would burn Dublin down rather than suffer it to fall into the hands of the English. Such an act would also disgrace him in the eyes of all mankind; for nobody would believe his friends would venture so far without his sanction. Such an act would also draw on those who committed it severities which otherwise they had no cause to apprehend ; for inhumanity to vanquished enemies was not among the faults of the Prince of Orange. For these reasons James charged his hearers, on their allegiance, neither to sack nor to destroy the city.—Macaulay's History of England, ch. xvi.

* The citizens of Dublin.

Dublin-Dublinum.

Prince of Orange-Princeps Arausiensis.

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