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POET.

What think I now ? Ev’n what I thought before ;-
What boasts tho'

may deplore,
Still I repe.it, words lead me not astray
When the shown feeling points a different way.
Sinooth

can say grace at slander's feast, And bless each haut-yout cooked by monk or priest; Leaves the full lie on

-'s gong to swell, Content with half-truths that do just as well ; But duly decks his mitred comrade's flanks, And with him shares the Irish nation's thanks!

So much for you, my Friend! who own a Church,
And would not leave your mother in the lurch!
But when a Liberal asks me what I think--
Scared by the blood and soot of Cobbett's ink.
And Jeffrey's glairy phlegm and Connor's foam,
In search of some safe parable I roam
An emblem sometimes may comprise a tome !
Disclaimant of his uncaught grandsire's mood,
I see a tiger lapping kitten's food :
And who shall blame him that he purrs applause,
When brother Brindle pleads the good old cause ;
And frisks his pretty tail, and half unsheathes his

claws!
Yet not the less, for modern lights unapt,
I trust the bolts and cross-bars of the laws
More than the Protestant milk all newly lapt,
Impearling a tame wild-cat's whiskered jaws !

27*

THE DEVIL'S THOUGHTS.

I.

FROM his brimstone bed at break of day,

A walking the Devil is gone, To visit his

snug

little farm the Earth, And see how his stock goes on.

II.

Over the hill and over the dale,

And he went over the plain, And backward and forward he switched his long tail

As a gentleman switches his cane.

III. And how then was the Devil drest? Oh! he was in his Sunday's best : His jacket was red and his breeches were blue, And there was a hole where the tail came through.

IV.

He saw a Lawyer killing a viper

On a dunghill hard by his own stable; And the Devil smiled, for it put him in mind

Of Cain and his brother Abel.

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He saw an Apothecary on a white horse

Ride by on his vocations ;
And the Devil thought of his old friend

Death in the Revelations.

VI.

He saw a cottage with a double coach-house,

A cottage of gentility ;

Thine eyelash on my cheek doth play

'Tis Mary's hand upon my brow! But let me check this tender lay

Which none may hear but she and thou ! Like the still hive at quiet midnight humming, Murmur it to yourselves, ye two beloved women!

FIRST ADVENT OF LOVE

O FAIR is Love's first hope to gentle mind !

As Eve's first star thro’ fleecy cloudlet peeping ; And sweeter than the gentle south-west wind, O’er willowy meads and shadowed waters creeping, And Ceres' golden fields the sultry hind Meets it with brow uplift, and stays his reaping,

NAMES.

FROM LESSING.

I ASKED my fair

, one happy day,
What I should call her in my lay!
By what sweet name from Rome or Greece ;
Lalage, Neara, Chloris,
Sappho, Lesbia, or Doris,

Arethusa, or Lucrece.

“Ah!" replied my gentle fair,
Beloved, what are names but air ?

Choose thou whatever suits the line ;
Call me Sappho, call me Chloris,
Call me Lalage, or Doris,

Only, only call me Thine."

DESIRE.
WHERE true Love burns, Desire is Love's pure

flame;
It is the reflex of our earthly frame,
That takes its meaning from the nobler part,
And but translates the language of the heart.

LOVE AND FRIENDSHIP OPPOSITE. HER ER attachment may differ from yours in degree,

Provided they are both of one kind; But friendship how tender soever it be

Gives no accord to Love, however refined.

Love, that meets not with Love, its true nature re

vealing, Grows ashamed of itself, and demurs: If you cannot lift hers up to your state of feeling,

You must lower down your state to hers.

NOT AT HOME.

THAT Jealousy may rule a mind

Where Love could never be
I know ; but ne'er expect to find

Love without Jealousy.

She has a strange cast in her ee,

A swart sour-visaged maid-
But yet Love's own twin-sister she,

His house-mate and his shade.

And she looked to Mr.

And leered like a love-sick pigeon.

XIV.

He saw a certain minister

(A minister to his mind) Go up

into a certain House, With a majority behind,

XV.

The Devil quoted Genesis,

Like a very learned clerk,
How “ Noah and his creeping things,
Went

up

into the Ark.”

XVI.

He took from the poor,
And he

gave

to the rich, And he shook hands with a Scotchman,

For he was not afraid of the

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General burning face

He saw with consternation, And back to hell his way did he take, For the Devil thought by a slight mistake

It was general conflagration.

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