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Clap on the extinguisher, pull up the blinds,
And soon the ventilated spirit finds
Its natural daylight. If a foe have kenned,
Or worse than foe, an alienated friend,

A rib of dry rot in thy ship's stout side,
Think it God's message, and in humble pride
With heart of oak replace it; thine the gains-
Give him the rotten timber for his pains!

COMPLAINT.

HOW
OW seldom, Friend! a good great man inherits
Honor or wealth, with all his worth and pains!
It sounds like stories from the land of spirits,

If any man obtain that which he merits,

Or

any merit that which he obtains.

REPROOF.

For shame, dear Friend! renounce this canting strain !

What would'st thou have a good great man obtain ?
Place-titles-salary-a gilded chain-

Or throne of corses which his sword hath slain ?-
Greatness and goodness are not means, but ends!
Hath he not always treasures, always friends,
The good great man?-three treasures, love and
light,

And calm thoughts, regular as infant's breath;And three firm friends, more sure than day and night

Himself, his Maker, and the angel Death.

1809.

INSCRIPTION FOR A TIME-PIECE.

Now!
OW! it is gone.—Our brief hours travel post,
Each with its thought or deed, its Why or
How ;-

But know, each parting hour gives up a ghost
To dwell within thee-an eternal Now!

1830.

MY BAPTISMAL BIRTH-DAY.

GOD'S child in Christ adopted,-Christ my all,—
What that earth boasts were not lost cheaply,

rather

Than forfeit that blest name, by which I call
The Holy One, the Almighty God, my Father?-
Father! in Christ we live, and Christ in Thee—
Eternal Thou, and everlasting we.

The heir of heaven, henceforth I fear not death:
In Christ I live in Christ I draw the breath
Of the true life!-Let then earth, sea, and sky
Make war against me! On my front I show
Their mighty master's seal. In vain they try
To end my life, that can but end its woe-
Is that a death-bed where a Christian lies ?-
Yes! but not his 'tis Death itself there dies.

ΕΠΙΤΑΦΙΟΝ ΑΥΤΟΓΡΑΠΤΟΝ.

QUE linquam, aut nihil, aut nihili, aut vix sunt

mea-sordes

Do morti ;-reddo cætera, Christe! tibi.

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EPITAPH.

STOP, Christian Passer-by-Stop, child of God,
And read with gentle breast. Beneath this sod
A poet lies, or that which once seemed he.—
O, lift one thought in prayer for S. T. C.;
That he who many a year with toil of breath
Found death in life, may here find life in death!
Mercy for praise-to be forgiven for fame

He asked, and hoped, through Christ. Do thou the same!

9th November, 1833.

APOLOGETIC PREFACE

TO "FIRE, FAMINE, AND SLAUGHTER.

Ar the house of a gentleman, who by the principles and corresponding virtues of a sincere Christian, consecrates a cultivated genius and the favorable accidents of birth, opulence, and splendid connexions, it was my good fortune to meet, in a difiner-party, with more men of celebrity in science or polite literature, than are commonly found collected round the same table. In the course of conversation, one of the party reminded an illustrious poet, then present, of some verses which he had recited that morning, and which had appeared in a newspaper under the name of a War-Eclogue, in which Fire, Famine, and Slaughter were introduced as the speakers. The gentleman so addressed replied, that he was rather surprised that none of us should have noticed or heard of the poem, as it had been at the time a good deal talked of in Scotland. It may be easily supposed, that my feelings were at this moment not of the most comfortable kind. Of all present, one only knew, or suspected me to be the author; a man who would have established himself in the first rank of England's living poets, if the enius of our country had not decreed that he should rather be the first in the first rauk of its philosophers and scientific benefactors. It appeared the general wish to hear the lines. As my friend chose to remain silent, I chose to follow his example, and Mr. ***** recited the poem. This he could do with the better grace, being known to have ever been not only a firm and active Anti-Jacobin and Anti-Gallican, but likewise a zealous admirer of Mr. Pitt, both as a good man and a great statesman. As a poet exclusively, he had been amused with the Eclogue; as a poet he recited it; and in a spirit which made it evident that he would have read

See page 119.

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TRANSLATED FROM SCHILLER.*

I. THE HOMERIC HEXAMETER DESCRIBED AND
EXEMPLIFIED.

STRONGLY it bears us along in swelling and

limitless billows,

Nothing before and nothing behind but the sky and the Ocean.

II. THE OVIDIAN ELEGIAC METRE DESCRIBED AND

EXEMPLIFIED.

IN N the hexameter rises the fountain's silvery column;

In the pentameter aye falling in melody back.

IV.

TO THE YOUNG ARTIST, KAYSER OR
KASERWERTH.

KAYSER! to whom, as to a second self,

Nature, or Nature's next-of-kin, the Elf, Hight Genius, hath dispensed the happy skill To cheer or soothe the parting friend's alas! Turning the blank scroll to a magic glass, That makes the absent present at our will; And to the shadowing of thy pencil gives Such seeming substance, that it almost lives :

Well hast thou given the thoughtful Poet's face! Yet hast thou on the tablet of his mind

A more delightful portrait left behind-
Ev'n thy own youthful beauty, and artless grace,

* See note at the end of the volume.

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