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Art. 3. It is agreed that the people of the United States shall continue to enjoy unmolested the right to take fish of every kind on the Grand Bank, and on all the other banks of Newfoundland ; also, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and at all other places in the sea, where the inhabitants of both countries used at any time heretofore to fish; and also, that the inhabitants of the United States shall have liberty to take fish of every kind on such part of the coast of Newfoundland as British fishermen shall use ; (but not to dry or cure the same on that island ;) and also on the coasts, bays, and creeks, of all other of his Britannic Majesty's dominions in America ; and that the American fishermen shall have liberty to dry and cure fish in any of the unsettled bays, harbors, and creeks of Nova Scotia, Magdalen Islands, and Labrador, so long as the same shall remain unsettled ; but so soon as the same or either of them shall be settled, it shall not be lawful for the said fishermen to dry or cure fish at such setllement, without a previous agreement for that purpose with the inhabitants, proprietors, or possessors of the ground.

Art. 4. It is agreed that creditors on either side shall meet with no lawful impediment to the recovery of the full value in sterling money, of all bona fide debts heretofore contracted.

Art. 5. It is agreed that the Congress shall earnestly recommend it to the Legislatures of the respective States, to provide for the restitution of all estates, rights, and properties, which have been confiscated, belonging to real British subjects, and also of the estates, rights, and properties of persons resident in districts in the possession of his Majesty's arms, and who have not borne arms against the said United States. And that persons

any other description shall have free liberty to go to any part or parts of any of the thirteen United States, and therein to remain twelve months, unmolested in their endeavors to obtain the restitution of such of their estates, rights, and properties, as may have been confiscated, and that Congress shall also earnestly recommend to the several States, a reconsideration and revision of all acts

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or laws regarding the premises, so as render the said laws or acts perfectly consistent, not only with justice and equity, but with that spirit of conciliation, which, on the return of the blessings of peace, should universally prevail. And that Congress shall also earnestly recommend to the several States, that the estates, rights, and properties of sich last-mentioned persons, shall be restored to them, they refunding to any persons who may be now in possession, the bona fide price (where any nas been given) which such persons may have paid on purchasing any of the said lands, rights, or properties, since the confiscation. And it is agreed, that all persons who have any interest in confiscated lands, either by debts, marriage settlements, or otherwise, shall meet with no lawful impediment in the prosecution of their just rights.

Art. 6. That there shall be no future confiscations made, nor any prosecutions commenced against any person or persons for, or by reason of, the part which he or they may have taken in the present war; and that no person shall, on that account, suffer any future loss or damage, either in his person, liberty, or property; and chat those who may be in confinement on such charges, at the time of the ratification of the Treaty in America, shall be immediately set at liberty, and the prosecutions so commenced be discontinued.

ART. 7. There shall be a firm and perpetual peace between his Britannic Majesty and the said States, and between the subjects of the one and the citizens of the other, wherefore all hostilities, both by sea and land, shall from henceforth cease : all prisoners on both sides shall be set at liberty ; and his Britannic Majesty shall, with all convenient speed, and without causing any destruction, or carrying away any negroes or other property of the American inhabitants, withdraw all his armies, garrisons, and fleets, from the said United States, and from every post, place, and harbor within the same ; leaving in all fortifications the American artillery that may be therein ; and shall also order and cause all archives, records, deeds, and papers, belonging to any of the said States, or their citizens, which, in the course of the war, may have fal

len in to the hands of his officers, to be forthwith restored and delivered to the proper States and persons to whom they belong · Art. 8. The navigation of the river Mississippi, from its source to the ocean, shall for ever remain free and open to the subjects of Great Britain, and the citizens of the United States. .

Art. 9. In case it should so happen that any place or territory belonging to Great Britain or to the United States, should have been conquered by the arms of either from the other, before the arrival of the said Provisional Articles in America, it is agreed, that the same shall be restored without difficulty, and without requiring any compensation.

Art. 10. The solemn ratifications of the present Treaty, expedited in good and due form, shall be exchanged between the contracting parties, in the space of six months, or sooner if possible, to be computed from the day of the signature of the present Treaty. In witness whereof, we, the undersigned, their Ministers Plenipotenciary, have, in their name and in virtue of our full powers, signed with our hands the present definitive Treaty, and caused the seals of our arms to be affixed thereto. Done at Paris, this third day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-three. (L. s.]

D. HARTLEY, (L. S.

JOHN ADAMS, [L. s.]

B. FRANKLIN, (L. s.

JOHN JAY.

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AN ORDINANCE

FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF THE TERRITORY OF THE UNITED STATES NORTHWEST OF THE RIVER OHIO

Be it ordained by the United States in Congress as sembled, That the said Territory, for the purposes of temporary government, be one District ; subject, bowe,

er, lo be divided into two Districts, as future circumstan. ces may, in the opinion of Congress, make it expedient. • Be it ordained by we authority aforesaid, That the estates both of resident and non-resident proprietors in the said Territory, dying intestate, shall descend to, and be distributed among their children, and the descendants of a deceased child, in equal parts ; "the descendants of a deceased child or grandchild to take the share of their deceased parent in equal parts among them : and where there shall be no children or descendants, then in equal parts to the next of kin, in equal degree ; and among collaterals, the children of a deceased brother or sister of the intestate shall have, in equal parts among them, their deceased parents' share ; and there shall, in no case, be a distinction between kindred of the whole and half blood; saving in all cases to the widow of the intestate, her third part of the real estate for life, and one third part of the personal estate ; and this law relative to descents and dower, shall remain in full force, until altered by the Legislature of the District. And until the Governor and Judges shall adopt laws as herein after mentioned, estates in the said Territory may be devised or bequeathed by wills in writing, signed and sealed by him or her, in whom the estate may be, (being of full age,) and attested by three witnesses ; and real estates may be conveyed by lease and release, or bargain and sale, signed, sealed, and delivered, by the person, being of full age, in whom the estate may be, and attested by two witnesses, provided such wills be duly proved, and such conveyances be acknowledged, or the execution thereof duly proved, and be recorded within one year after proper magistrates, courts, and registers, shall be appointed for that purpose ; and personal property may be transferred by delivery ; saving, however, to the French and Canadian inhabitants, and other settlers of the Kaskaskies, Saint Vincents, and the neighboring villages, who have heretofore professed themselves citizens of Virginia, their laws and customs now in force among then, relative to the descent and conveyance of property.

Be it ordained by the authority aforesaid, That there

shall be appointed, from time to time, by Congress, a Governor, whose commission shall continue in force for the term of three years, unless sooner revoked by Con. gress : he shall reside in the District, and have a freehold estate therein, in one thousand acres of land, while in the exercise of his office.

There shall be appointed, from time to time, by Con gress, a Secretary, whose commission shall continue in force for four years, unless sooner revoked; he shall reside in the District, and have a freehold estate therein, in five hundred acres of land, while in the exercise of his office; it shall be his duty to keep and preserve the acts and laws passed by the Legislature, and the public records of the District, and the proceedings of the Governor in his executive department; and transmit authentic copies of such acts and proceedings, every six months, to the Secretary of Congress : There shall also be appoint. ed a court, to consist of three Judges, any two of whom to form a court, who shall have a common law jurisdiction, and reside in the District, and have each therein a freehold estate, in five hundred acres of land, while in the exercise of their offices ; and their commissions shall continue in force during good behavior.

The Governor and Judges, or a majority of them, shall adopt and publish in the District, such laws of the original States, criminal and civil, as may be necessary, and best suited to the circumstances of the District, and report them to Congress, from time to time ; which laws shall be in force in the District until the organization of the General Assembly therein, unless disapproved of by Congress ; but afterwards the Legislature shall have authority to alter them as they shall think fit.

The Governor for the time being, shall be commander-in-chief of the militia, appoint and commission all officers in the same, below the rank of general officers ; all general officers shall be appointed and commissioned by Congress.

Previous to the organization of the General Assembly, the Governor shall appoint such magistrates and other civil officers, 'n each county or township, as he shall find

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