An Account of the Late Revolution in New England

Capa
Reprinted for J. Sabin, 1865 - 26 páginas
 

Opinião das pessoas - Escrever uma crítica

Não foram encontradas quaisquer críticas nos locais habituais.

Outras edições - Ver tudo

Palavras e frases frequentes

Passagens conhecidas

Página 21 - ... them which were true Lovers of their Country, were seldom admitted to, and seldomer consulted at the Debates which produced these unrighteous Things : Care was taken to keep them under Disadvantages ; and the Governor, with five or six more, did what they would. We bore all these, and many more such Things, without making any attempt for any Relief; only Mr. Mather, purely...
Página 7 - Council-Chamber, (which is here also inclosed); to inform him how unsafe he was like to be if he did not deliver up himself, and Fort and Government forthwith, which he was loath to do. By this time, being about two of the Clock (the Lecture being put by) the Town was generally in Arms, and so many of the...
Página 23 - English are supposed to have died through sickness and hardship, than we have Adversaries there alive; and the whole War hath been so managed, that we cannot but suspect in it a Branch of the Plot to bring us low; which we leave to be further enquir'd into in due time. § XI. We did nothing against these Proceedings, but only cry to our God; they have caused the cry of the Poor to come unto him, and he hears the cry of the Afflicted.
Página 3 - An Account | of the | Late Revolution | in | New England. | Together with the | Declaration | of the | Gentlemen, Merchants, and Inhabitants of Boston, | and the Country adjacent.
Página 17 - Stage, for the most detestable Enormities that ever the Sun beheld, all Men have with Admiration seen what methods have been taken that they might not be treated according to their Crimes. Without a Verdict, yea, without a Jury sometimes have People been fined most unrighteously; and some not of the meanest Quality have been kept in long and close Imprisonment without any the least Information appearing against them, or an Habeas Corpus allowed unto them. In short, when our Oppressors have been a...
Página 8 - Ledget) which is under the command of Mr. John Nelson; and at the Castle, which is under the Command of Mr. John Fairweather, is Mr.
Página 20 - Lands pertaining to these and those particular Men, to be measured out for his Creatures to take possession of; and the Right Owners, for pulling up the Stakes, have passed through Molestations enough to tire all the Patience in the World. They are more than a few, that were by Terrors driven to take Patents for their Lands at...
Página 7 - ... forthwith, which he was loath to do. By this time, being about two of the Clock (the Lecture being put by) the Town was generally in Arms, and so many of the Countrey came in, that there was twenty Companies in Boston, besides a great many that appeared at Charles Town that could not get over (some say fifteen hundred). There then came Information to the Soldiers, That a Boat was come from the Frigat that made towards the Fort, which made them haste thither, and come to the Sconce soon after...
Página 24 - English with worse then Turkish Cruelties ; and while we are in equal danger of being surprised by them, it is high time we should be better guarded, than we are like to be while the Government remains in the hands by which it hath been held of late. Moreover, we have understood, (though the Governour has taken all imaginable care to keep us all ignorant thereof) that the Almighty God hath been pleased to prosper the noble undertaking of the Prince of Orange...
Página 22 - Meafures that be was upon. However, after this, we were injured in thofe very Things which were complained of; and befides what Wrong hath been done in our Civil Concerns, we fuppofe the Minifters and the Churches every where have feen our Sacred Concerns apace going after them : How they have been Difcountenanced, has had a room in the Reflection of every Man, that is not a Stranger in our Ifrael.

Informação bibliográfica