The Works of Henry Fielding: With an Essay on His Life and Genius, Volume 7

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Bickers and Son, 1903
 

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Página 320 - Between the acting of a dreadful thing And the first motion, all the interim is Like a phantasma, or a hideous dream : The genius, and the mortal instruments, Are then in council; and the state of man, Like to a little kingdom, suffers then The nature of an insurrection.
Página 398 - cries Jones, "dost thou take to be such a coward here besides thyself?" "Nay, you may call me coward if you will; but, if that little man there upon the stage is not frightened, I never saw any man frightened in my life.
Página 55 - Good name in man and woman, dear my lord, Is the immediate jewel of their souls : Who steals my purse, steals trash ; 'tis something, nothing ; 'Twas mine, 'tis his, and has been slave to thousands : But he that filches from me my good name Robs me of that which not enriches him, And makes me poor indeed, Oth.
Página 195 - Marivaux, fill my pages with humour; till mankind learn the goodnature to laugh only at the follies of others, and the humility to grieve at their own.
Página 359 - ... they were then empty; for he would most certainly have been well satisfied to have relinquished them, on a less sufficient excuse than what Mrs. Miller could now have made. But there are a sort of persons, who, as Prior excellently well remarks, direct their conduct by something Beyond the fix'd and settled rules Of vice and virtue in the schools, Beyond the letter of the law...
Página 4 - The foibles and vices of men, in whom there is great mixture of good, become more glaring objects from the virtues which contrast them and shew their deformity; and when we find such vices attended with their evil consequence to our favourite characters, we are not only taught to shun them for our own sake, but to hate them for the mischiefs they have already brought on those we love.
Página 263 - Vanbrugh and Congreve copied nature ; but they who copy them draw as unlike the present age, as Hogarth would 5 do if he was to paint a rout or a drum in the dresses of Titian and of Vandyke. In short, imitation here will not do the business. The picture must be after nature herself. A true knowledge of the world is gained only by conversation, and the manners of every rank must be seen in order to be known.
Página 399 - During the second act Partridge made very few remarks. He greatly admired the fineness of the dresses; nor could he help observing upon the king's countenance. "Well," said he, "how people may be deceived by faces?
Página 4 - For in the former instance he may be both concerned and ashamed to see a pattern of excellence, in his nature, which he may reasonably despair of ever arriving at; and in contemplating the latter, he may be no less affected with those uneasy sensations, at seeing the nature of which he is a partaker degraded into so odious and detestable a creature.
Página 194 - ... charming ages yet to come. Foretel me that some tender maid, whose grandmother is yet unborn, hereafter, when, under the fictitious name of Sophia, she reads the real worth which once existed in my Charlotte, shall from her sympathetic breast send forth the heaving sigh. Do thou teach me not only to foresee, but to enjoy, nay, even to feed on future praise. Comfort me by...

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