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CO N T E N T S.

Of the Truth of the Christian Religion. By DAVID

HARTLEY, M. A. Lond. 1749. p. I.

This Tract is printed from the second volume of Doctor Hartley's Ob ervations on Man ; it is written, as all the other parts of that work are, with fingular closeness of thought ; and to be well understood, must be read with great attention.

Grotius ; Abbodie; Fabricius ; Limborch; Jacquelot; Houtteville ; Pascal ; Stillingfleet; Stackhouse ; Benson ; Clarke; Leland; Lardner; Macknight; Chanda ler; Jenkins ; Stebbing; fortin; Foster, Nichols, and a great many other authors; have taken laudable pains in proving the truth of the. Christian religion; but I know not any author, Grotius excepted, who has, in fo short a compass, said more to the purpose on that subject than Doctor Hartley has done in the tract which is here republished.

Of the Truth of the Christian Religłon.' By JOSEPH

ADDISON, Esq. p. 76.

This posthamous Treatise of Mr. Addison has been much efs teemed both at home and abroad : the general argument contained in it has been carried to a greater length by other authors since his time; especially by Mr. Correvon of Geneva ; by Professor Bullet of Besançon ; and by Dr. Lardner; who has treated it in all its parts with great accuracy in his Collection of Jewish and Heathen Tefti. monies to the Truth of the Christian Religion. There is, unfortunately, in many men, a strange prepoffeffion against every thing written by churchmen, in defence of the Christian religion ; that“ Priests of all religions are the fame”-that “ they defend altars on which their lives depend," with an hundred other expresfions of a similar tendency; are frequent in the mouths of believers ? we fincerely forgive them this wrong ; but as the charge of felfishness and hypocrisy cannot, with any shadow 'of propriety, be brought against Mr. Addison, and fuch other laymen as have written in support of Christianity, we intreat them to give a sober attention to what these unprejudiced writers have advanced on the subject : furely eternal life is too important a concern to be jested away in sarcastic witticism, and frothy disputation. Vol. Y. A 2

of

un

Of the Argument for the Truth of Christianity arising from

the fulfilment of our Saviour's predictions concerning the destruction of the Temple, and the City of ferusalem, and the dispersion of the fews. Being the third chapter of the first vol

. of a Collection of Jewish and Heathen Testimonies to the Truth of the Christian Religion. By N. LARDNER, D. D. 1764. p. 103.

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The argument for the truth of Christianity which is taken from the history of the destruction of Jerusalem as related by Jofephus, compared with our Saviour's prediction of that event recorded by the Evangelists Matthew, Mark, and Luke, has always been considered as one of the strongest which can be urged, either against the Jews in particular, or against anbelievers in general. In modern times this argument has been illustrated by Jackson in the first volume of his works, 1673 ; by. Tillotson in the 12th vol. (8vo ed.) of his Sermons; by Kidder in his Demonstration of the Mesfah; by Whitby in his Commentary on St. Matthew, and in his General Preface by Sharpe in a discourse intituled, The Rise and Fall of the Holy City and Temple of Jerusalemn, preached at the Temple Church, 1764; and, to mention no others, by Jortin in the firit. vol. of his Remarks on Ecclefiaftical History. This author has also well proved, not only that the Gospels, in which the predictions of Christ relative to the destruction of Jerusalem are delivered, were written before that event ; but that the predictions themselves could not have been inserted into the Gospels, as interpolations, after the event : the reader will not esteem this to have been an unnecessary labour, who recollects the confidence with which Voltaire, with a view probably of evading the force of the argument in queftion, declares that the Gospels were written after Jerusalem was destroyed— fans doute après la destruction de Jerusalem. Many an unbeliever is apt to think and say, that he would have faith in the Gospel, if he could see a man raised from the dead, or any one notable iniracle performed in attestation of its truth. Now the completion of an ancient prophecy is, to us who see the completion, a miracle ; and I would sincerely recommend it to every one, who is not steadfast in the faith, to examine carefully, and liberally, whether the prophecies-concerning Jerusalem being trodden under foot of the Gentiles--concerning the iterility of Palestine-the state of the Jewish people the introduction of the Gentiles into the Church of God--the apoftafy of the latter times--the independency

of the Arabs— the servitude of Ham's pofterity, &c. have not been · literally fulfilled. These things are facts which fail within our own

obfervation; and if we search the Scriptures, we shall find that there facts were predicted long before either we or our fathers were born.

The

The present conftitution of the world, with respect to the civiliza-
pion, the religion, the liberty, or havery of the different empires
which sublift in it, is but one ftage of the completion of the va-
rious prophecies, which were of old delivered, concerning the for-
tunes of individuals, nations and countries. We in our days may
say what Tertullian, speaking of the accomplishment of Scripture
prophecy, said in his--Quicquid agitur prænunciabatur, quicquid vi-
detur audiebatur. The reader may find these subjects difcuffed by
Bp. Newton in his Differtations on the Prophecies ; by Whison in
his Accomplishment of Scripture Prophecy ; by Sharpe in his second
Argument in defence of Christianity ; by Lardner in his three Ser,
mons on the Circumstances of the Jewilh People, an Argument for the
Truth of Chriftianity ; by the author of the Principes de la Foi Chré-
tienne ; by the author of an Effay in the Universal History, on The
Independency of the Arabs ; by Bishops. Hurd, Hallifax, and Bagot,
in their Sermons preached at Warburton's Lecture ; by Joseph Mede,
and Henry Mire, in their relpective works ; and by IPorthington ia
bịs Sermon preached at Boyle's Lecture, 1766, &c.

All the sțions recorded in the Gospels are probable,

P. 177.

This Tract is the 4th chap. of the ist book of the Truth of the
Gospel History, by Macknight. Young men should render this short
tract familiar to them by a frequent perufal of it ; they will find in it
very concise, but satisfactory answers to many objections respecte
ing some parts of our Saviour's conduct, the possibility and the
credibility of miracles, &c. which are, fometimes seriously, oftener
in wanton mockery of religion, made subjects of common conver-
sation, and which never fail to leave a bad impression on the minda
of thole who know not how to reply to them.

of the Argument for the Truth of the Christian Religion

arising from the conversion of the world to Christianity :
taken from the Truth of the Gospel History, By JAMES
MACKNIGHT, D. D, 1763. p. 199.

That great multitudes out of every nation in the then known
world were converted from Heathenism to Christianity, within a
few years after the death of Jesus, is a fact allowed on all hands;
the question is, whether this fact can be properly urged as a decisive
proof of the divine origin of the Christian religion. And, with:
but doubt, the fact, abstractedly considered, cannot.

The exterio
five propagation of a religion, how rapidly soever it may have been

made,

Ε Ν Τ

Of the Argument for the Truth of Christianity arising from

the fulfilment of our Saviour's predictions concerning the destruction of the Temple, and the City of Jerusalem, and the dispersion of the "fews. Being the third chapter of the first vol. of a Collection of Jewish and Heathen Testimonies to the Truth of the Christian Religion. By N. LARDNER, D. D. 1764. p. 103.

The argument for the truth of Christianity which is taken from the history of the destruction of Jerusalem as related by Josephus, compared with our Saviour's prediction of that event recorded by the Evangelifts Matthew, Mark, and Luke, has always been considered as one of the strongest which can be urged, either against the Jews in particular, or against unbelievers in general. In modern times this argument has been illustrated by Jackson in the first volume of his works, 1673 ; by. Tillotson in the 12th vol. (8vo ed.) of his Ser'mons; by Kidder in his Demonstration of the Meiljah; by Whitby in his Commentary on St. Matthew, and in his General Preface ; by Sharpe in a discourse intituled, The Rise and Fall of the Holy City and Temple of Jerusalem, preached at the Temple Church, 1764; and, to mention no others, by Jortin in the firit. vol. of his Remarks on Ecclefiaftical History, This author has allo well proved, not only that the Gospels, in which the predictions of Christ relative to the destruction of Jerusalem are delivered, were written before that event; but that the predictions themselves could not have been inserted into the Gospels, as interpolations, after the event : the reader will not esteem this to have been an unnecessary labour, who recollects the confidence with which Voltaire, with a view probably of evading the force of the argument in queftion, declares that the Gospels were written after Jerusalem was destroyed-fans doute après la destruction de Jeruialem.-Many an unbeliever is apt to think and say, that he would have faith in the Gospel, if he could see a man raised from the dead, or any one notable iniracle performed in attestation of its truth. Now the completion of an ancient prophecy is, to us the car

7, a miracle ; and I would fincerely recom" is not steadfast in the faith, to ex whether the prophecies-con foot of the Gentiles--conce

ate of the Jewish people-

o che Church of God the a:

pendency of the Arabs the seri

s not beer literally fulfilled. TI

niniour or observation; and if

and that it facts were predicted

bere born.

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