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7. Hand work of pupils, made to illustrate subjects of study.
8. Portfolios of drawings.
9. Portfolios of photographs.
10. Manual training models, numbered in series and attached to screens.

11. School exercises of any kind that show orderly development, theories of instruction, and principles of method.

12. Original investigation of educational problems.
13. Ofice equipment.
11. Homemade apparatus.
15. Administrative blanks.

The response to circulars was not general, and most of the material exhibited was obtained by the personal solicitation of the director.

The following cities and towns contributed to the exhibit:

Athol, Auburn, Becket, Boston, Brookline, Chester, Clinton, Everett, Fall River, Fitchburg, Gardner, Georgetown, Groveland, Hav bill awrence, Lowell, Lynn, Malden, New Bedford, Newton, North Adams, Northampton, Orange, Pepperell, Pittsfield, Revere, Somerville, Springfield, Sutton, West Brookfield, Weston, Winthrop, and Worcester.

Among the most prominent and valuable features of the exhibit were those representing the Massachusetts Agricultural College and the State normal schools. The agricultural college occupied a large space in the educational exhibit and was also the most prominent donor to the State exhibit in the Palace of Agriculture, while it contributed generously to the general exhibit of the agricultural colleges and experiment stations collected and arranged by the United States Government. The normal schools, under the advice of the director, took, in general, a single branch of study each, and showed the method in which the study is pursued. In this way no duplications were made, and the collective exhibit gave a satisfactory view of normal school work in the State.

Of the cities and towns the following deserve especial mention :

BOSTON.

The exhibit of the city of Boston formed a part of the Massachusetts exhibit. It was limited in space and therefore had no room for ornamentation beyond that which was furnished by the work itself. While it was in harmony with the rest of the State exhibit, which was simple, but effective and beautiful, it was filled to every inch of space with charts—graphic and statistical-and with work direct from the schools, and every part generously illustrated and aided by photographs. The wall space allotted to Boston admitted of the close placing of 24 cabinets, and 6 more were placed in the center.

Though apparently restricted in space as compared with other large cities, yet every subject of school work, of both day and evening schools, was shown in detail, from the kindergarten through the normal school. The work of the evening drawing schools was vividly and systematically arranged on the outside of the booth.

The work was exhibited by subjects. The first cabinet contained the kindergarten work; the next 11 cabinets the elementary nature study, geography, arithmetic, history, music, physical training, drawing, language, cooking, and manual training; the next 10 the high school work in English, literature, history, commercial branches, botany, zoology, physiology, drawing, mathematics, physics, chemistry, foreign languages, and the work of the Mechanic Arts High School; then one cabinet showing administration and public lectures; one cabinet for normal school work; one for work of the Horace Mann School for the

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.*' questo huu of the arrangement. Erery school in the city was peaks **** the Auld change Most of the work had been done in the regular e Man Sind was simplr copied on the proper paper for uniformity. po them thus sent in a committee of teachers selected that which would itu them of studr and arranged it in proper order. The most important

Wir of the exhibit was that it represented the regular work of the schools stunt and the rolumes showed the quality of the work by classes. Equip

The paprits and photographs in the mall cabinets exemplified the course of photographs. Tro methods of teaching reading in the first grade were shown by

melt, methods, and material that could not be shown otherwise were shown by appropriate to the work contained in the cabinet. The aim of the photographs series of photographs. The glass door of each cabinet held a large photograph was in erert case to make clearer the work of the schools and not for ornamentation. The graphic charts in the administration cabinet showed plainly the school organization, the growth of the schools, the relative number of male and female teachers, the course of study and relative amount of time given to each subject, and, in fact, nearly ererything that the student of education would

Worcester had a full representation of elementary and high school work, full erhibit of school work in all departments, with a large number of photo

filling sir "units " and corering a large wall space. New Bedford presented a graphs representing school architecture. Springfield gave a complete representation of her work in the evening school of trades, a fine exhibit of high sent a masterly representation of the work of her English high school, with school work, and a fully illustrated course of study in arithmetic, careful and complete representation of her courses of study in language, drawing, and her kindergartens. Lynn sent a full exhibit of work in arithmetic and a training. Lowell showed the work of her evening schools, her training school, representation of her work in manual training in her English high school.

The features of the Massachusetts exhibit which attracted most attention tion of the highest standard of exhibition work, the exhibit of nature study by

from risitors were the Boston high school exhibit in language, a fine representawork shown by the training school of the Il yannis normal, the exhibit of the the practice school of the Bridgewater normal, the correlated school and home State lilurary commission, and the exhibit of the evening school of trades,

l'ulque features were the exhibits of the Lowell textile school, the nautical training school, the educational centers of Boston, the work of vacation schools

in Bistou, the high school organization from New Bedford, the designs from the

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-rgarten. a general, it may be said of the Massachusetts educational exhibit that it showed fully the present attainments of a State school system which gives the largest possible local freedom in the management of schools, attainments which, in the minds of her citizens, justify the confidence which has been given to them from the founding of this ancient Commonwealth.

MISSISSIPPI.

BY T. L. TRAWICK.

THE EXHIBIT.

This exhibit was collected by Prof. T. L. Trawick, then residing at Crystalsprings, Miss., and though hurriedly gotten together was a very fair representation of the Mississippi educational system.

The State department was represented by six very elaborately prepared charts, five showing the statistical side of educational matters. The colleges were very meagerly represented, the agricultural and mechanical being the best. The colored colleges of Alcorn and Tougaloo were exceedingly well represented. The following high schools were represented: Crystalsprings, Greenville, Corinth, Jackson, McComb, Hattiesburg, Wesson, Grenada, Canton, Meridian, Columbus, Brookhaven, Learned, Utica. The high school exhibits were excellent, especially the one from Crystalsprings. The work of this school was arranged according to a pian adopted by the Washington, D. C., schools at Paris in 1900, and was composed of photographs of pupils at work in school. Jackson also bad a fine exhibit of manuscript work.

Among the private schools the work displayed from French Camp and Blue Mountain College was excellent.

Mississippi's booth was well arranged and her exhibits were tastily displayed.

MISSOURI.

BY G. V. BUCHANAN, SUPERINTENDENT.

THE EXHIBIT.

'The space allotted to Missouri for her educational exhibit consisted of a strip of floor space 30 feet wide and 140 feet long, lying near the main entrance to the building. This space fronted on the main aisle and extended back between 15-foot aisles. Immediately across one of these aisles was the exhibit of the city of St. Louis, occupying an equal area, and just beyond the St. Louis exhibit was that of the State university. Thus the Missouri educational exhibits presented a continuous front on the main aisle of the building of 105 feet, with an extreme depth of 140 feet.

For the purpose of collecting and arranging this educational exhibit the State

Deaf and Dumb; one of sewing; four cabinets for evening elementary, evening high, and educational center schools.

The space in the wall cabinets amounted to about 4,000 square feet. Below these wall cabinets were show cases, or counters, containing note books and manual work in the subjects shown above; and beneath these were shelves for the bound volumes, pamphlets, and industrial work of the vacation and evening schools. Above the cabinets were panels containing the shop work of the day schools, extending around the entire space. On the wall above the panels were pictures of school buildings, etc.

The plan of the exhibit was designed for the convenience of educators who desired to study it, and the number who spent hours with notebooks in hand testified to the wisdom of the arrangement. Every school in the city was represented. In February each master was requested to send in work in whatever subjects he should choose. Most of the work had been done in the regular daily routine and was simply copied on the proper paper for uniformity. From the work thus sent in a committee of teachers selected that which would cover the course of study and arranged it in proper order. The most important feature of the exhibit was that it represented the regular work of the schools of the city.

The papers and photographs in the wall cabinets exemplified the course of study and the 200 volumes showed the quality of the work by classes. Equipment, methods, and material that could not be shown otherwise were shown by jibotographs. Two methods of teaching reading in the first grade were shown by series of photographs. The glass door of each cabinet held a large photograph appropriate to the work contained in the cabinet. The aim of the photographis was in every case to make clearer the work of the schools and not for ornamentation. The graphic charts in the administration cabinet showed plainly the school organization, the growth of the schools, the relative number of male and female teachers, the course of study and relative amount of time given to each subject, and, in fact, nearly everything that the student of education would desire to know.

Worcester had a full representation of elementary and high school work, filling six " units” and covering a large wall space. New Bedford presented a full exhibit of school work in all departments, with a large number of photographs representing school architecture. Springfield gave a complete representation of her work in the evening school of trades, a fine exhibit of higli school work, and a fully illustrated course of study in arithmetic. Somerville sent a masterly representation of the work of her English high school, with careful and complete representation of her courses of study in language, drawing, and penmanship. Brookline showed a complete course of study in manual training. Lowell showed the work of her evening schools, hier training school, and her kindergartens. Lynn sent a full exhibit of work in arithmetic and a representation of her work in manual training in her English high school.

The features of the Massachusetts exhibit which attracted most attention from visitors were the Boston high school exhibit in language, a fine representatien of the highest standard of exhibition work, the exhibit of nature study by the practice school of the Bridgewater normal, the correlated school and home work shown by the training school of the Ilyannis normal, the exhibit of the State library commission, and the exhibit of the evening school of trades, Springfield.

Unique features were the exhibits of the Lowell textile school, the nautical training school, the educational centers of Boston, the work of vacation schools in Boston, the high school organization from New Bedford, the designs from the

Somerville high school, the sloyd training school, and modern methods in kindergarten.

In general, it may be said of the Massachusetts educational exhibit that it showed fully the present attainments of a State school system which gives the largest possible local freedom in the management of schools, attainments which, in the minds of her citizens, justify the confidence which has been given to them from the founding of this ancient Commonwealth.

MISSISSIPPI.

BY T. L. TRAWICK.

THE EXHIBIT.

This exhibit was collected by Prof. T. L. Trawick, then residing at Crystalsprings, Miss., and though hurriedly gotten together was a very fair representation of the Mississippi educational system.

The State department was represented by six rery elaborately prepared charts, five showing the statistical side of educational matters. The colleges were very meagerly represented, the agricultural and mechanical being the best. The colored colleges of Alcorn and Tougaloo were exceedingly well represented. The following high schools were represented: Crystalsprings, Greenville, Corinth, Jackson, McComb, Ilattiesburg, Wesson, Grenada, Canton, Meridian, Columbus, Brookhaven, Learned, Utica. The high school exhibits were excellent, especially the one from Crystalsprings. The work of this school was arranged according to a pian adopted by the Washington, D. C., schools at Paris in 1900, and was composed of photographs of pupils at work in school. Jackson also had a fine exhibit of manuscript work.

Among the private schools the work displayed from French Camp and Blue Mountain College was excellent.

Mississippi's booth was well arranged and her exhibits were tastily displayed.

MISSOURI.

BY G. V. BUCHANAX, SUPERINTENDENT.

THE EXHIBIT.

The space allotted to Missouri for her educational exhibit consisted of a strip of floor space 30 feet wide and 140 feet long, lying near the main entrance to the building. This space fronted on the main aisle and extended back between 15-foot aisles. Immediately across one of these aisles was the exhibit of the city of St. Louis, occupying an equal area, and just beyond the St. Louis exhibit was that of the State university. Thus the Missouri educational exhibits presented a continuous front on the main aisle of the building of 105 feet, with an extreme depth of 140 feet.

For the purpose of collecting and arranging this educational exhibit the State

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