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Looking at the comparative table above, Table I, it will be seen that the per cent of the population enrolled in the “common schools” (elementary or “district" and high schools) was 20.01, a very slight decrease being noticeable since 1900, when the per cent was 20.51. But the ratio in actual attendance has increased more than enough to make up for the loss in enrollment. And the average number of days' attendance on school by each pupil enrolled was only 78.4 for the year 1870; it reached 86.3 days in 1890, and in 1902 passed the hundred limit (100.6); in 1904 it reached 102.1 days.

The aggregate of school property increased in value $41,000,000 over the previous year. The average expenditure for school purposes arose to 16) cents per day of instruction for each pupil, the amount for the previous year being 15} cents per day.

The following table gives, for the year 1903-4, the Federal, State, and local expenditure for all purposes with some degree of approximation; also the expenditure for the different classes of schools and other institutions of learning. It will be seen that there was expended for education a sum nearly equal to one-half of the cost of the National Government. Of the total amount expended for all public purposes by the States, counties, cities, towns, etc. ($691,000,000), nearly twofifths (39.5 per cent) was paid for common schools. Total disbursements by the United States (as reported by Census Bureau).. $725, 984, 946 Estimated expenditure by States..

106,000,000 Estimated expenditure by minor civil divisions.

585,000,000 Total public expenditure....

1,416, 984, 946 Expended for common schools (elementary and secondary).

273, 216, 227 Approximate expenditure for private schools (elementary and secondary).. 22,000,000 Approximate expenditure for universities and colleges..

40,000,000 Approximate expenditure for professional schools.

3,000,000 Approximate expenditure for normal schools...

6,000,000 Total expenditure for education....

314, 216, 227

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TABLE II.--Number of pupils and students of all grades in both public and private schools and colleges, 1903h.
NOTE.-The classification of States made use of in the following table is the same as that adopted by the United States consus, and is as follows: North Atlantic Division:
Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, South Atlantic Division: Delaware, Maryland,
District of Columbia, Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. South Central Division: Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi,
Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Indian Territory. North Central Division: Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, North
Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, and Kansas. Western Division: Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, Nevada, Idaho, Washington, Oregon, and
California.

a Including pupils in preparatory or academic departments of higher institutions, public and private, and excluding elementary pupils, who are classed in columns 2 and 3.
A classification of public and of private secondary students, according to the character of the institutions in which they are found, is given in Chap. XXIX, vol. 2.

o This is made up from the returns of individual high schools to the Bureau, and is somewhat too small, as there are many secondary pupils outside the completely
organized high schools whom there are no means of enumerating.

c Including colleges for women, agricultural and mechanical (land-grant) colleges, and scientific schools. Students in law, theological, and medical departments are excluded,
being tabulated in columns 9-11. Students in academic and preparatory departments are also excluded, being tabulated in columns 4 and 5.

d Mainly State universities and agricultural and mechanical colleges.
e Including also schools of dentistry, pharmacy, and veterinary medicine.
| Mainly in schools or departments of medieine and law attached to State universities.
g Nonprofessional pupils in normal schools are included in columns 4 and 5.
Å There are, in addition to this number, 23,612 students taking normal courses in universities, colleges, and public and private high schools. (See Chap. XXVIII, vol. 2.)

TABLE II.-Number of pupils and students of all grades in both public and private schools and colleges, 1903-4Continued.

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The following tables show the trend of the statistics of annual increment of school enrollment and population and the distribution of the increase among elementary, secondary, and higher institutions, public and private.

Table III a.Increase in fourteen years of the total number of persons receiving education

and of the total population.

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Table IIIb.Per cent of the population receiving education of different grades.

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Tables IVa and IVb show the relative amounts of schooling given in the different census divisions at different periods since 1870, measured by years of 200 days each. For example, the 5.21 years given for 1904 indicate 1,042 days' schooling for each inhabitant if enrollment and attendance should hold the same percentage to population for thirteen years as it held during 1904. Then the number arriving at school age, 6 years, would have attended 1,042 days on the completion of their eighteenth year if their average attendance per year had been the same as the schools of the nation, public and private, reported for 1904. Table IVc shows the estimated average amount of schooling in days at different epochs, beginning with

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