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By a reference to a report of the Commissioners of the Land Office, Convention document No. 27, it will be seen that the lands reserved for salt purposes had, at the adoption of the present Constitution, been reduced to.....

.. 550 acres. Since which, and by the authority contained in the

second clause of the section given above, the State has purchased....

543.12 And reclaimed by lowering the Onondaga lake... 209

1302.12 Under the same provision the State has sold or exchanged

127.25

Salt lands now owned by the State.....

1174.87

In reply to an interrogatory of this Convention, in relation to the value of these lands and the salines connected therewith, the Commissioners of the Land Office say :

"First. We do not know the present value of the salt lands blonging to the State, and have no means of making an estimate of the approximate value thereof.

Second. We know of no way of determining the value of the salines. The State owns the water and delivers it to various indi. viduals and companies to be made into salt, receiving from these parties such sums as has been determined by law. This sum, since 1846, has been one cent a bushel of 56 pounds.

" The value of the salines must then be considered as that sum that the State may justly demand of the manufacturers for the salt water delivered to them.”

In addition to the above mentioned real estate and the sali nes therein contained, the State owns over three hundred thousand dol. lars' worth of other property which is employed, as indicated in the following schedule, in the supplying of brine to the manufacturers of salt:

Fifteen salt wells now in use, cost and present value, as near

as can be ascertained, $3,000 each... 6 rotary pumps, $250 each...... 1 pump house and machinery at Geddes...

$45,000

1,500 15,000

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1 pump house and machinery, 3d ward, Syracuse.. $30,000 1 pump house and machinery, 1st ward, Syracuse....

35,000 (Old pump house at Syracure worn out, probably cost

$15,000.) 3 high reservoirs, one in 3d ward, one in 1st ward, Syracuse and one at Geddes, $5,000 each..

15,000 8 reservoirs, at Geddes, 1st ward, Syracuse, and at Liver. pool, $2,500 each...

20,000 1 earth reservoir at Syracuse, 3d ward.....

20,000 40 miles, as estimated, of log conduits, now worth about 55 cents per lineal foot..

116,160 1 dressed stone office, in 3d ward, Syracuse.

7,500 1 brick office in 1st ward, Syracuse....

4,000 (one balf of it used as canal Collector's office.) 1 brick office at Liverpool.

800 1 brick office at Geddes..

800 1 barrel stand at 1st ward, $350, one at Liverpool, $250.. 600 1 barrel stand at Geddes..

550

$311,710

During the last twenty-one years, the State has received a revenue from the salt manufactured at these springs in the way of duty of ......

$1,264,133 91 And expended in ordinary expenses, damages and improvements....

948,922 31 Leaving a net balance to the State of.

$315,211 60

As will appear in detail from the annexed statement:

EXPENDITURES.

RECEIPTS.

Total,

YEARS.
Ordinary expenses

North side cut canal
and improvements.

Onondaga lake im

provement.

Current Revenue.

1848.

$1,000 00

1846. . $18,917 78 1847.. 30,547 95

25,520 21 1849.. 29,754 05 1850..

29,027 00 1851.. 30,000 00 1852.. 33,911 53 1853.. 24,826 70 1854.. 25,250 00 1855.. 51,000 00 1856.. 43,000 00 1857.. 52,000 00 1858.. 59,000 00 1859..

44,000 00 1860.. 43,916 00 1861..

48,500 00 1862.. 39,000 00 1863.. 32,000 00 1864..

50,000 00 1865..

48,000 00 1866..

49,184 00

$18,917 78 30,547 95 25,520 21 29,754 05 29,027 00 30,000 00 34,911 53 24,82670 25,250 00 51,000 00 43,000 00 66,000 00 61,300 00 56,000 00 51,416 00 63,500 00 43,074 44 32,000 00 50,000 00 48,000 00 49,184 00

$75,507 34 32,398 64 43,347 67 51,598 98 44,364 03 45,458 58 47,928 17 52,159 85 54,987 88 57,777 90 60,975 82 53,476 91 58,138 18 69,026 54 65,875 51 66,299 57 87,418 98 76,090 75 88,125 31 62,765 64 70,411 66

14,000 00

2,300 00 12,000 00

7,500 00 15,000 00 4,074 44

$807,355 22 $55,874 44 $863,229 66

$1,264,133 91

Amount of moneys paid for damages

and removing salt structures from lands sold, ..

85,692 65

$948,922 31

The Salt Company of Onondaga was organized early in the year 1860, under the general manufacturing laws of this State, for the manufacture and sale of salt, with a cash capital of $160,000, which was subsequently increased by a stock dividend of an equal amount. Arrangements were entered into with the owners of blocks, by which all the fine salt blocks, 316 in number, were leased to this company for the term of ten years, at a yearly rent or interest of twelve and a half per cent upon an estimated average valuation of over $5,500 each. A similar 'arrangement was effected with the

manufacturers of solar salt, by which 38,517 vats or covers were leased to the company at twelve and a half per cent on an average valuation of $40 each.

The absolute control thus secured over the manufacturers enables the company to determine the quantity of salt that shall be manyfactured; the number of works that shall be employed in such manufacture; the price that shall be paid to the manufacturers, and the price at which it shall be sold.

An ordinary fine salt block is capable of making from 250 to 280 bushels of salt per day. Of the 316 fine salt blocks on the reservation, not more than one-half or two-thirds of them are kept in repair, and only a small portion of this latter class is kept in continuous operation during the whole salt manufacturing season.

The introduction of coal in the manufacture of fine salt has been attended with highly beneficial results. Its superiority over wood is evidenced in the improved quality of the salt, which can be produced at a largely reduced cost. Former apprehensions in regard to the scarcity and probable price of wood have been dissipated. The future production will only be limited for the want of adequate facilities to raise and distribute the brine, which nature has deposited in this exhaustless reservoir which underlies these works, and for the want of a remunerative market. The price of coal at the works has varied for several years past from three dollars to seven dollars per ton; it is now selling freely at five dollars. By an advantageous contract, the salt company are enabled to furnish the manufacturers with coal for the next seventeen years, at an advance of fifty cents over prime cost.

The production of salt by solar evaporation is steadily increasing, as will be seen from the tables which accompany this report. A solar cover (as the vat is called, into which the brine is placed for evaporation), costs from forty to fifty dollars, and will produce about fifty bushels of salt in a season. The quality of the salt produced by this process is, for many purposes, superior to that produced by artificial heat. The following table exhibits the production of the works and the price at which the same has been sold at Syracuse for the last twenty years: [Con. No. 156.]

2

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1847 ...

1848 ...

1849 1850 1851 ... 1852 .. 1853 1854 ... 1855 .. 1856 ... 1857 ... 1858 ... 1859 .. 1860 1861 1862 1863 1864 1865 1866

3,951,355 4,737,126 5,083,569 4,268,919 4,614,117 4,922,533 5,404,524 5,803,347 6,082,885 5,966,810 4,312,126 7,033,219 6,894,272 5,593,247 7,200,391 9,053,874 7,942,383 7,378,834 6,385,930 7,158,503

262,879
342,497
377,735
374,732
378,967
633,595
577,947
734,474
498,124
709,391

481,280
1,514,554
1,345,022
1,462,565
1,884,697
1,983,022
1,437,656
1,971,122
1,886,760
1,978,183

$1 56
1 06

80
1 50
1 25
1 00
1 50
1 40
1 30
1 60
1 25
1 33
1 00
1 25
1 25
1 50
2 45
3 25
2 50
2 35

$0 877 $1 17

75 93

70 77 1 25

1 19 1 25 1 25 1 00 1 00 1 123

1 18 1 30 1 34 1 30 1 30 1 25 1 41 1 25 1 25 1 25 1 27 83

90 1 25 1 25 1 25 1 25 1 25 1 40 1 70 1 99 2 00 2 70 2 10 2 26 2 35 2 35

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The cost of producing a bushel of fine salt has varied materially during the last six or eight years. In 1861, the Salt Company of Onondaga paid the manufacturers of fine salt 114 cents per bushel, wbich included fuel, boiling and repairs; manufacturers of solar salt received during the same year 51 cents per bushel. In the fall of 1862, the price paid for manufacturing fine salt was advanced to 16 cents per

bushel.

By a reference to the testimony of John W. Barker, Esq., who is the secretary of the company, and also a manufacturer of salt, it will be seen that the price which the company pays during the present year is as follows, namely: for boiled salt, nineteen cents per bushel, and for solar salt, eight cents per bushel : that the cost to the company for a barrel containing five bushels of salt is as follows:

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