The Principles of Economical Philosophy, Volume 1

Capa
Longmans, Green, Reader, and Dyer, 1872
 

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Índice

Generally admitted that Physical Science is the true basis of all Science
15
Comtes Doctrine
16
Order of the Sciences
17
Comte fails to make Economics an Inductive Science
18
Selfcontradiction of Mr J S Mill as to the Method of Investigation proper to Economics
19
He says the Inductive is the true method to investigate Economics
20
Unanimous opinion that Economics is an Inductive Science
21
Mr Mills arguments untenable
23
Mr Mills assertion erroneous
24
CHAPTER II
29
CHAPTER III
46
Definition of Wealth in Roman Law
48
Rise of Economical Ideas in Modern Times
49
The Mercantile System
50
The doctrine of the BALANCE OF TRADE
52
Example to show its fallacy
53
Error of the system
54
Refutation of the System in Adam Smith
55
SECTION II
57
Observations on these examples
64
FrancoIS QUESNAY 59
67
Fundamental Defects of the Physiocrate doctrine
68
Le Trosnes arguments against admitting Immaterial and In corporeal Quantities to be Wealth
70
Physiocrate doctrine of Taxation
71
The Commercial Treaty of 1786
72
Merits of the Physiocrates
73
THE SECOND SCHOOL OF ECONOMISTS 8 34 ADAM SMITH and CONDILLAC
75
The WEALTH OF NATIONS
76
Real advance of Smith
79
J B Say
82
Mr John Stuart Mill
84
Mr Mills definition of Wealth
85
Defects of Mr Mills work
86
Triumph achieved by this School
88
PAGE
114
CHAPTER IV
127
The quantity of money in a country bears no necessary
208
On RATE of INTEREST and RATE of PROFIT
215
Two distinct ways in which Capital may increase
223
Examination of Mr Mills four fundamental propositions
232
Cases of Hiring
239
On SUPPLY and DEMAND
259

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Página 247 - Consumption is the sole end and purpose of all production ; and the interest of the producer ought to be attended to, only so far as it may be necessary for promoting that of the consumer.
Página 42 - But know, that in the soul Are many lesser faculties, that serve Reason as chief ; among these, fancy next Her office holds ; of all external things, Which the five watchful senses represent, She forms imaginations, airy shapes, Which reason, joining or disjoining, frames All what we affirm or what deny, and call Our knowledge or opinion ; then retires Into her private cell when nature rests.
Página 245 - The annual labour of every nation is the fund which originally supplies it with all the necessaries and conveniences of life which it annually consumes, and which consist always either in the immediate produce of that labour, or in what is purchased with that produce from other nations.
Página 156 - The property which every man has in his own labour, as it is the original foundation of all other property, so it is the most sacred and inviolable.
Página 259 - THERE IS ONE SORT of labour which adds to the value of the subject upon which it is bestowed: there is another which has no such effect.
Página 260 - The labour of the menial servant, on the contrary, does not fix or realize itself in any particular subject or vendible commodity. His services generally perish in the very instant of their performance, and seldom leave any trace or value behind them, for which an equal quantity of service could afterwards be procured.
Página 35 - ... which make those men that take their instruction from the authority of books and not from their own meditation to be as much below the condition of ignorant men as men endued with true science are above it.
Página 304 - ... is to be counted into the bread we eat; the labour of those who broke the oxen, who digged and wrought the iron and stones, who felled and framed the timber employed about the plough, mill, oven, or any other utensils, which are a vast number, requisite to this corn, from its...
Página 75 - Political economy, considered as a branch of the science of a statesman or legislator, proposes two distinct objects: first, to provide a plentiful revenue or subsistence for the people, or more properly to enable them to provide such a revenue or subsistence for themselves; and second, to supply the state or commonwealth with a revenue sufficient for the public services. It proposes to enrich both the people and the sovereign.
Página 130 - Fourthly, of the acquired and useful abilities of all the inhabitants or members of the society. The acquisition of such talents, by the maintenance of the acquirer during his education, study, or apprenticeship, always costs a real expense, which is a capital fixed and realized, as it were, in his person.

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