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12. The outward-bound WeftIndia fleet difperfed in a gale of wind, fince which time numbers of the tranfports, and fome of the ships of war, have reached port.

1. The whig club refolved to inftitute affociations for the purpose of procuring the repeal of the above bills.

Advice was received of the. French having refufed to confent to a ceffation of hoftilities with the Germanic empire, which had been applied for by the emperor, through the court of Denmark, for the purpofe of entering into a negociation. -The British cavalry, and feveral emigrant corps, in the pay of Great Britain, arrived at Shields from the Elbe.

22. Weldon, a private foldier, found guilty of high treafon in Dublin.

neral Doyle's army had embarked at Ifle Dieu, on their return to England.

15. The houfe of commons refolved to address his majesty to order the attorney general to profecute Mr. Reeves, as the author of a li. bellous pamphlet reflecting on the conftitution of this country.

(From Mr. Pratt's Gleanings.)

18. Two bills for the prefervation of his majesty's person, and the

prevention of fediti us meetings,

HE

+

received the royal affent by com-
mission.
Thefe bills caufed many
very fpirited debates in both houses,
and petitions from various parts of
the country, both for and against
them were presented.

E was fingular in many of the
common habits of life; for
inftance, he preferred damp fheets,
linen and clothes to dry ones, and,
both riding and going to bɩd,
fwathed himself with coarfe towels
dipped in the coldest water he
could get in that ftate he remained
half an hour, and then threw them
off, freshened and invigorated, as
he faid, beyond me fure. He ne-
ver put on a great coat in the coldest
countries, nor had been a minute
under or over the time, of an ap-
pointment, fo far as it depended on
himself, for fix and twenty years. He
never continued at a place, or with a
perfon, a fingle day beyond the pe-
riod prefixed for going, in his whole
life; and he had no, for the last
fixteen years of his existence. ate
any fish, fleth, or fowl, nor fat
down to his fimple fare of tea, milk,
and rufks all that time.
His jour-
neys were continued from prifon to
prifon, from one groupe of wretch-

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25. Intelligence received that ge
VOL. XXVII.

Both houses of parliament adjourned, the lords to the 5th, the commons to the 2nd of February.

27. Intelligence received of the deteat of the French army under the command of general Marceau, and the confequent evacuation of Kreutxnach by the enemy; and that the British Mediterranean fleet had returned to St. Domingo in diftrefs.

3. Advice was received of the outward-bound Weft-India convoy having been again difper ed on the 26th, at which time there were only ninety-five fail in company.

SINGULARITIES of Mr. HOWARD the PHILANTHROPIST.

ed beings to another, night and day and where he could not go with a carriage, he would ride; and where that was hazardous, he would walk. Such a thing as an obstruction was out of the question.

What a fabre! what an arm! what teeth! (faid the reclufe to himielf;) my furniture is very solid, yet this man may eat all up at three or four meals. I muft make a friend of him! Sir! (faid he,) I admire the dexterity of your arm. You are a man of very extraordina

(From the Arabian Tales: or a Con

tinuation of the Arabian Nights En-ry powers; 1 defire your acquainttertainments.) ance, and hope you will not judge me unworthy of the honour.

Adventurers are commonly diftrufted, but to a man like you I cannot help revealing every circumftance in my fituation.

Follow me then to the back part of my grotto, I have there fome cheefes of goats' milk and cakes, which I fhall readily fhare with you; come, we will there eat at our leifure, and converse freely

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STORY of the EXPLOITS and DEATH of CAPTAIN RAGGADO and his BRAVOS.

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APTAIN Raggado, (or Hackhill), after travelling over much of the world, found himself on the confines of Upper Egypt. He was infatiably voracious; but the terror which he infpired made every perfon flee before him, fo that he could find none to fupply his

wants.

As he was one day croffing a defart, chance led him to the grotto of a dervise. Holy man (faid he) you fee before you a foldier who is ready to die for hunger; have you never a few nuts for one to crack?

He immediatly drew his fahre, and with one troke took off a flice from the ftone, of the thickness of three palm-leaves taken together; he next bruised it between his teeth, and swallowed it.

At the fame time, he fhewed him a ftone fix feet long, and three feet high.

The rats have,good teeth (replied the dervife, without rifing or laying afide his book:) they have devoured all the nuts which the charity of the faithful have bestow-ufe ed on me, and have left me only the fhells. The only provifions I have remaining, is that bifcuit of the Nile, which you fee before my door.

Do you eat of that? (replied Raggado;) you have certainly a goo ftomach! I know this paftry: the Egyptian pyramids are made of it, yet I care not if I eat with you. To other ftomachs than ours this would be indigeftible stuff. Allow me to cut it.

With all my heart, (replied Raggado:) I love people in your way of life; I have known more than one of you, who had not paffed their lives in dozing over books; and I fhall willingly do penance with you for my paft crimes with the cup in my hand.

I have neither cups nor goblets, I nothing but pitchers, (faid the dervise.)

And for my part, I had rather want the pitcher than the wine! (cried the reclufe.)

A dervife have wine !-You make the hairs of my head ftand for aftonishment! Confider that I have retired hither to lead a life of penitence: I drink nothing but pure water, mixed with a little honey, which makes a pleafant enough beverage.

The captain fhook his head,; he was obliged to yield to circumftances. He affifted his hoft to fet upon a broad ftone, as their table, a quantity

a quantity of cheese and cakes. | that at ten draughts, I drank up There was as much as would have two hundred and fixty pints, the ferved other eight perfons; yet this whole produce of the vintage. My was not much for the pair, who hoft came in upon me, and renow fat down to it. They were proached me as a drunkard; I felt feated on fofas of the fame stuff as the reproach and killed him In the table; each was furnished with remorte for this crime, I affumed a large pitcher of hydromel, and the the habit of a dervile, and conrepaft began. fined myfelf to drink hydromel. Having in confequence of that refolution, wandered from one recefs to another, ftill in fearch of the moft fequestered and remote, I have at laft taken up my abode here, where I employ my leifure, in gathering fimples, and confulting the ftars."

The dervife after eating one cheese, without leaving even a crumb of the cruft, faid, " brother, let us drink," took up a pitcher, and fwallowed the contents at a draught. "Here's to you," faid he to aggado, who viewed him with furprise.

You must have been very thirsty indeed, to empty this whole pitcher at a breath-were your ftomach paved with ftones like mine, it might run out of you like a river.

Alas! brother, (faid the dervife,) I am at prefent greatly corrected; it was in confequence of having drank too much, that i reduced myfelf to this life of penitence. However, I ftill quench my thirst, but no longer indulge in drinking to excefs. You furprifed me by cut ting, and eating up fo great a piece of my bifcuit:- fhall furprife you equally by a recital of my ftory. "I'am called Ballayah, or (ready to drink.). If I had not found water too infipid, while I lived in the world, I might have dried up rivers. It would at any rate have been a dangerous experiment, to give me the fea to drink, for its tafte might have tempted me to drink it dry.

My good faint, (replied Raggado,) fince from a drunkard you are become an aftrologer, I must inform you of my quarrel with the ftars. I fhould be glad to be along fide of mine, that I might give her a few blows with the broad fide of my fabre, and the fame to one of her comrades, in return for their capricious behaviour to me.

My name is Raggado, I was born in the capital of Circaffia. By the account of an aftrologer who was one of my father's good friends, two fters were travelling together, with a good provifion of propitious and malignant influences. She of the two who had the fmallest cargo proceeded foremost. Three women had been delivered on the fame day, each of a male child. They lived in three of the principal houfes, which formed one of the angles of the street leading to the king's palace. Let us make hafte thither, faid the obliging ftars), and dif pofe of our cargoes in behalf of thefe new comers. As they advanced, the foremost happened to touch on my mother's houfe, at the very moment when I was coming

"One day when was in Georgia, in the house of a man, who had generously received me, the vintage was finished, and he had ftored up the produce of his. My bed happened unluckily to ftand too near the precious store All of a fudden, I was awakened by anto fragrance fo agreeable, that I could not refift the temptation, but went up to the cafks which were working. I ventured to tafte the liquor, and found it fo delicious,

the world; the acccident made her ftop a little. can go no further (faid fhe) my burden has become too heavy-I must let it fall here and with this fhe dropped it ftraight upon me. I can

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not

How! (faid Ballayah) had you exterminated the women too?

By Mahomet, (replied the captain,) I am vaftly fond of women; but when they faw me they cried out as if they had been flayed, ran away, threw ftones upon me from the roofs of the houfes, encouraged their hufbands, and let loose their

not well tell you what it was the
bestowed with fuch good will; but
certainly it was a burden which I
fometimes bear very impatiently
myfelf, and which has often proved
troublesome to others; it has made
me the strongest but the most impa-
tient of mankind; I am always in
want; I live by rapine; nothing
but the mere weakness of the fear-dogs against me: I had my cafque
and buckler broken in ten different
places, and the fleshy part of my
arm torn away by a mafliff; I love
the women, but not when they are
tranfported with rage; for then
whether young or old, ugly or
handfome, I cut in pieces as many
of them as come in, my way,
without fparing one who makes the

ful and timid man refifts my fabre,
-him therefore I attack with my
fifts, which are not the lighteft, you
fee. Thefe, good dervife, are the
gifts which fell upon my cradle.
The ftar which followed mine, was
obliged to halt with a lading, which
was furely intended for me, over a
neighbouring palace; and what,
think you, did the drop upon it ?-fmalleft refiftance.
A crown fo you fee, and I may
without vanity fay that I was within
a door of the throne; the aftrolo-
ger told my
father that it was fate;
I, for
my part, think it was rather
caprice; my bright protectrefs
might have carried her favours one
door farther. Do you know my
good faint, that I am devilishly an-
gry with her, and have tried more
means than one to give the lie to
my horoscope.

You are rather hot-blooded captain, you should like me, drink nothing but hydromel.

By Mahomet, your hydromel reduces me to a jelly, instead of quenching my thirft: my malignant ftar would triumph, did fhe fee to what I am now reduced; let us if poffible contrive how to correct her influence. If I could but get up to the fkies, I fhould bring her to reafon. But cannot you who are an aftrologer, help me to right my felf by means of your machines?

You may play your ftar á dif ferent trick, (faid Ballayah); treat. her as I have treated mine. Had not the determined that I should be Ian idle ftroller, a vagabond? had not the condemned me to drink like a fifh? You fee how I have outwitted her; I have thrown myfelf into this retirement, where I drink hydromel in a reasonable way; and in fpite of her I am stilk good for fomething. You a man of war, fhould follow a different plan; to avoid all the inconveniences which attend all your exploits, you should ftrive to be a general without an army, and should endeavour to mafter a strong town without walls, gates, or trenches,

"I gathered armies, was a good commander, and yet a better fighter, but my foldiers were poltrons: there were always enough to eat, but never any to fight. One day I entered a town without, obferving that I was not followed by my men; cut in pieces all who oppofed me, purfued and hacked down all who attempted to flee, carried fire before me where the fword could not penetrate; and in fhort facked the town; my army imagined me to be loft, and fled in a panic of terror. What happened then? As I had wasted the country, had given no quarter, and my army was fled, now that I faw myself a king, by the force of my own arm, and the edge of my own fabre, I had not a foul to reign over.',

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My good dervife! your name I find is expreffive of your character; I now know your abilities, and think you a very fober man ;-a moft extraordinary talent this of yours; you might ruin all Egypt if you chofe.

Oh! in order to that, (replied Ballayah) I fhould be obliged to drink up the Nile to its head; and the journey is too far

You fhall fee them to-morrow, faid the dervife; they fhall exhibit proofs of their abilities in your prefence. They want only your counfel to direct their efforts, for they are chiefly deficient in underftanding. They need a leader to command them with authority, and fet them an example :-you shall be the man.

By Mahomet, (cried the captain, turning his eyes upward) I am tempted to pardon my bitch of a ftar the dance fhe has led me, fince fhe raises me at laft to command my equals !But let us converfe a little concerning the place we are going to attack ;-who is captain of it?What fhall we make of him?.

It is fubject to a tyrant called Big-. ftaf. Him you fhall drive away; one tyrant fhall fucceed another: thus fhall you belie your ftar; for you fhall reign like any other perfon, and perhaps better, as you are a ftranger to all but your own pleafure.-Have you any religion?

Hardly any. I am, however, circumcifed.

That is perfectly enough. My dear Ballayah, you are a faint of very accommodating principles, and this is what I like you for; I fhould wish to accuftom myfelf to your hydromel, that I might get drunk with you. However, before I lie down to reft, I should like to have a more diftinct idea of the town of Kallacahabalaba; for I form my plan of affault in my bed.

Kallacahabalaba, (replied the dervife) is fituated on a lofty infulated mountain, which rifes perpendicularly on all fides, to the height of fixty feet. No animal but a fnail can climb up it.

And how do the inabitants come down?

But the other companions you fpeak of (refumed Raggado), are They are let down in baskets, they fuch extraordinary characters fixed to iron chains, which are as yourself? I am extremely impa-moved upon pullies. Thofe bafkets are fo arranged that a hundred

tient to fee them.

of

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