The Sonnets of William Shakspere

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Paul, 1889 - 251 páginas

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Índice

When I do count the clock that tells the time 12
cii
O that you were yourſelf I but love you are 13
cv
Not from the ſtars do I my judgment pluck 14
cxi
But wherefore do not you a mightier way 16
cxii
Who will believe my verſe in time to come 17
cxvii
Shall I compare thee to a ſummers day 18
cxviii
Devouring Time blunt thou the lions paws 19
cxxiii
A womans face with Natures own hand painted 20
cxxiv
So is it not with me as with that Muſe 21
cxxix
Mine eye hath playd the painter and hath ſtelld 24
cxxxvi
Let thoſe who are in favour with their ſtars 25
cxli
Lord of my love to whom in vaſſalage 26
cxlii
How can I then return in happy plight 28
cxlviii
When in diſgrace with fortune and mens eyes 29
cliii
When to the ſeſſions of ſweet ſilent thought 30
cliv
If thou ſurvive my wellcontented day 32
clx
Full many a glorious morning have I ſeen 33
clxiii
Why didſt thou promiſe ſuch a beauteous day 34
clxiv
No more be grieved at that which thou haſt done 35
clxix
Let me confeſs that we two muſt be twain 36
clxx
As a decrepit father takes delight 37
clxxiii
How can my Muſe want ſubject to invent 38
clxxix
XL Take all my loves my love yea take them all 40
clxxx
Thoſe pretty wrongs that liberty commits 41
clxxxv
When moſt I wink then do mine eyes beſt ſee 43
cxci
If the dull ſubſtance of my fleſh were thought 44
cxcii
The other two flight air and purging fire 45
cxcvii
Mine eye and heart are at a mortal war 46
cxcviii
Betwixt mine eye and heart a league is took 47
cciii
How careful was I when I took my way 48
cciv
Againſt that time if ever that time come 49
ccix
How heavy do I journey on the way 50
ccx
Thus can my love excuſe the flow offence 51
ccxv
So am I as the rich whoſe bleſſed key 52
ccxvi
What is your ſubſtance whereof are you made 53
ccxxi
O how much more doth beauty beauteous ſeem 54
ccxxii
Not marble nor the gilded monuments 55
ccxxvii
Sweet love renew thy force be it not ſaid 56
ccxxviii
Being your ſlave what ſhould I do but tend 57
ccxxxiii
That God forbid that made me firſt your ſlave 58
ccxxxiv
If there be nothing new but that which is 59
ccxxxix
Like as the waves make towards the pebbled ſhore 60
ccxl
Is it thy will thy image ſhould keep open 61
ccxlv
Againſt my love ſhall be as I am now 63
ccli
When I have ſeen by Times fell hand defaced 64
cclii
Since braſs nor ſtone nor earth nor bound leſs fea 65
cclvii
Tird with all theſe for reſtful death I cry 66
cclviii
Thus is his cheek the map of days outworn 68
cclxiv
Thoſe parts of thee that the worlds eye doth view 69
cclxix
That thou art blamd ſhall not be thy defect 70
cclxxv
That time of year thou mayft in me behold 73
cclxxxii
So are you to my thoughts as food to life 75
cclxxxvii
Why is my verſe ſo barren of new pride 76
cclxxxviii
Thy glaſs will ſhow thee how thy beauties wear 77
ccxciii
So oft have I invokd thee for my Muſe 78
ccxcix
O how I faint when I of you do write 80
ccc
Or I ſhall live your epitaph to make 81
cccv
grant thou wert not married to my Muſe 82
cccvi
Who is it that ſays moſt? which can ſay more 84
cccxii
How ſweet and lovely doſt thou make the ſhame 95
cccxlvii
Some ſay thy fault is youth ſome wantonneſs 96
cccxlviii
How like a winter hath my abſence been 97
cccliii
From you have I been abſent in the ſpring 98
cccliv
The forward violet thus did I chide 99
ccclix
Where art thou Muſe that thou forgetſt ſo long 100
ccclx
O truant Muſe what ſhall be thy amends
ccclxv
My love is ſtrengthend though more weak in ſeeming 102
ccclxvi
Alack what poverty my Muſe brings forth 103
ccclxxi
To me fair friend you never can be old 104
ccclxxii
Let not my love be calld idolatry 105
3
When in the chronicle of waſted time 106
4
Not mine own fears nor the prophetic ſoul 107
9
Whats in the brain that ink may character 108
10
O never ſay that I was falſe of heart 109
15
Alas tis true I have gone here and there
16
O for my fake do you with Fortune chide III
21
My glaſs ſhall not perſuade me I am old
22
As an unperfect actor on the ſtage
23
Since I left you mine eye is in my mind
27
Or whether doth my mind being crownd with you 114
28
Thoſe lines that I before have writ do lie 115
33
Let me not to the marriage of true minds 116
34
that I have ſcanted all 117
39
Like as to make our appetites more keen 118
40
What potions have I drunk of Siren tears 119
45
That you were once unkind befriends me now 120
46
Tis better to be vile than vile eſteemd 121
51
Thy gift thy tables are within my brain 122
52
No Time thou ſhalt not boaſt that I do change 123
57
If my dear love were but the child of ſtate 124
58
Weret aught to me I bore the canopy 125
63
O thou my lovely boy who in thy power 126
64
In the old age black was not counted fair 127
69
How oft when thou my muſic muſic playſt 128
70
The expenſe of ſpirit in a waſte of ſhame 129
75
My miſtreſs eyes are nothing like the ſun 130
76
Thou art as tyrannous ſo as thou art 131
81
Thine eyes I love and they as pitying me 132
82
never faw that you did painting need
83
Beſhrew that heart that makes my heart to groan 133
87
So now I have confefld that he is thine 134
88
Whoever hath her wiſh thou haſt thy Will 135
93
If thy ſoul check thee that I come ſo near 136
94
Thou blind fool Love what doſt thou to mine eyes 137
99
When my love ſwears that ſhe is made of truth 138
100
O call not me to juſtify the wrong 139
105
Be wiſe as thou art cruel do not preſs 140
106
In faith I do not love thee with mine eyes 141
111
Lo as a careful houſewife runs to catch 143
117
Two loves I have of comfort and deſpair 144
118
Thoſe lips that Loves own hand did make 145
123
My love is as a fever longing ſtill 147
129
O me what eyes hath Love put in my head 148
130
Cauft thou O cruel ſay I love thee not
136
Love is too young to know what conſcience is
141
Cupid laid by his brand and fell aſleep
147
The little Lovegod lying once aſleep
148

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Palavras e frases frequentes

Passagens conhecidas

Página 21 - O, for my sake do you with Fortune chide, The guilty goddess of my harmful deeds, That did not better for my life provide Than public means which public manners breeds. Thence comes it that my name receives a brand, And almost thence my nature is subdued To what it works in, like the dyer's hand.
Página cccxxiii - Farewell! thou art too dear for my possessing, And like enough thou know'st thy estimate: The charter of thy worth gives thee releasing; My bonds in thee are all determinate. For how do I hold thee but by thy granting? And for that riches where is my deserving?
Página cclii - When I have seen the hungry ocean gain Advantage on the kingdom of the shore, And the firm soil win of the watery main, Increasing store with loss and loss with store; When I have seen such interchange of state, Or state itself confounded to decay; Ruin hath taught me thus to ruminate, That Time will come and take my love away.
Página 70 - I envy those .jacks that nimble leap To kiss the tender inward of thy hand, Whilst my poor lips, which should that harvest reap, At the wood's boldness by thee blushing stand! To be so tickled, they would change their state And situation with those dancing chips, O'er whom thy fingers walk with gentle gait, Making dead wood more blest than living lips. Since saucy jacks so happy are in this, Give them thy fingers, me thy lips to kiss.
Página 124 - So shalt thou feed on Death, that feeds on men, And Death once dead, there's no more dying then.
Página 9 - Not mine own fears, nor the prophetic soul Of the wide world dreaming on things to come, Can yet the lease of my true love control, Supposed as forfeit to a confined doom.
Página cxi - ... even by the self-same sky, Vaunt in their youthful sap, at height decrease, And wear their brave state out of memory ; Then the conceit of this inconstant stay Sets you most rich in youth before my sight, Where wasteful Time debateth with Decay, To change your day of youth to sullied night ; And all in war with Time for love of you, As he takes from you, I engraft you new.
Página ccxl - Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore, So do our minutes hasten to their end; Each changing place with that which goes before, In sequent toil all forwards do contend.
Página 76 - Coral is far more red than her lips' red; If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head. I have seen roses damask'd, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks; And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; I grant I never saw a goddess go; My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground.
Página 118 - And whether that my angel be turn'd fiend Suspect I may, yet not directly tell; But being both from me, both to each friend, I guess one angel in another's hell. Yet this shall I ne'er know, but live in doubt, Till my bad angel fire my good one out.

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