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THE

SO N N E T S

OF

WILLIAM SHAKSPERE

Edited by EDWARU DOWDEN

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ARBOR SCIENTIÆK

ARBOR VITA

alle

LONDON

KEGAN PAUL, TRENCH, & CO., I, PATERNOSTER SQUARE

MDCCCLXXXIX

KC 6618

HARVARD UNIVG SITY LERAR

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XXIV. Mine eye hath play'd the painter, and hath

stell'd .

24

xxv. Let those who are in favour with their stars

25

XXVI. Lord of my love, to whom in vassalage

26

XXVII. Weary with toil, I haste me to my bed

27

XXVIII. How can I then return in happy plight .

28

xxix. When, in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes 29

xxx. When to the sessions of sweet silent thought 30

XXXI. Thy bofom is endeared with all hearts

31

XXXII. If thou survive my well-contented day

32

XXXIII. Full many a glorious morning have I seen 33

Xxxiv. Why didst thou promise such a beauteous day 34

xxxv. No more be grieved at that which thou hast done 35

XXXVI. Let me confess that we two must be twain 36

XXXVII. As a decrepit father takes delight.

37

XXXVIII. How can my Muse want subject to invent 38

xxxix. O, how thy worth with manners may I sing 39

XL, Take all my loves, my love, yea, take them all 40

XLI. Those pretty wrongs that liberty commits 41

XLII. That thou hast her, it is not all my grief

42

XLIII. When most I wink, then do mine eyes best see 43

xliv. If the dull substance of my flesh were thought 44

xlv. The other two, flight air and purging fire

XLVI. Mine eye and heart are at a mortal war

XLVII. Betwixt mine eye and heart a league is took 47

XLVIII. How careful was I, when I took my way

XLIX. Against that time, if ever that time come

49

L. How heavy do I journey on the way

50

LI. Thus can my love excuse the flow offence

51

LII. So am I as the rich, whose blessed key

52

LIII. What is your substance, whereof are you made 53

LIV. O, how much more doth beauty beauteous seem

54

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Lv. Not marble, nor the gilded monuments .

55

LVI. Sweet love, renew thy force ; be it not said 56

LVII. Being your slave, what should I do but tend .

57

LVIII. That God forbid that made me first your slave 58

LIX. If there be nothing new, but that which is . 59

LX. Like as the waves make towards the pebbled

shore.

60

LXI. Is it thy will thy image should keep open

61

LXII. Sin of self-love pofsefseth all mine eye

62

LXII. Against my love shall be, as I am now

63

LXIV. When I have seen by Time's fell hand defaced

64

LXV. Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor bound-

less fea

65

LXVI. Tir'd with all these, for restful death I cry 66

LXVII. Ah, wherefore with infection should he live 67

LXVIII. Thus is his cheek the map of days outworn 68

LXIX. Those parts of thee that the world's eye doth

view

69

LXX. That thou art blam'd shall not be thy defect .

70

LXXI. No longer mourn for me when I am dead

71

LXXII. O, left the world should talk you to recite

72

LXXIII. That time of year thou mayft in me behold

73

Lxxiv. But be contented: when that fell arreft

74

Lxxv. So are you to my thoughts as food to life

75

LXXVI. Why is my verse so barren of new pride

76

LXXVII. Thy glass will show thee how thy beauties wear 77

LXXVIII. So oft have I invok'd thee for my Muse

78

LXXIX. Whilft I alone did call upon thy aid

79

LXXX. O, how I faint when I of you do write

80

LXXXI. Or I shall live your epitaph to make

81

LXXXII. I grant thou wert not married to my Muse 82

LXXXIII. I never faw that you did painting need .

83

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