Our Summer Migrants: An Account of the Migratory Birds which Pass the Summer in the British Islands

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Bickers and Son, 1877 - 336 páginas

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Página 38 - Every thing did banish moan, Save the nightingale alone : She, poor bird, as all forlorn, Lean'd her breast up-till a thorn, And there sung the dolefull'st ditty, That to hear it was great pity : 'Fie, fie, fie...
Página 334 - I do not know in what district of England Turner first or % 3g. IK peculiar manifestalongest studied, but the scenery whose influence I can trace most i»n in Turner, definitely throughout his works, varied as they are, is that of Yorkshire. Of all his drawings, I think, those of the Yorkshire series have the most heart in them, the most affectionate, simple, unwearied, serious finishing of truth. There is in them little seeking after effect, but a strong love of place; little exhibition of the artist's...
Página 237 - ... the Pipit from its back on to the edge. It then stood quite upright on its legs, which were straddled wide apart, with the claws firmly fixed half-way down the inside of the nest among the interlacing fibres of which the nest was woven; and, stretching its wings apart and backwards, it elbowed the pipit fairly over the margin so far that its struggles took it down the bank instead of back into the nest.
Página 231 - ... its load with a jerk, and quite disengaged it from the nest. It remained in this situation a short time, feeling about with the extremities of its wings, as if to be convinced whether the business was properly executed, and then dropped into the nest again.
Página 231 - ... of the nest till it reached the top, where, resting for a moment, it threw off its load with a jerk, and quite disengaged it from the nest.
Página 334 - Ita peculiar . , ... , , . . manifestation in of the Yorkshire series have the most heart in them, the most affectionate, simple, unwearied, serious finishing of truth. There is in them little seeking after effect, but a strong love of place, little...
Página 238 - Pipits had welldeveloped quills on the wings and back, and had bright eyes, partially open ; yet they seemed quite helpless under the manipulations of the Cuckoo, which looked a much less developed creature. The Cuckoo's legs, however, seemed very muscular ; and it appeared to feel about with its wings, which were absolutely featherless, as with hands, the ' spurious wing' (unusually large in proportion), looking like a spread-out thumb.
Página 239 - ... spurious wing' (unusually large in proportion) looking like a spread-out thumb. The most singular thing of all was the direct purpose with which the blind little monster made for the open side of the nest, the only part where it could throw its burthen down the bank. I think all the spectators felt the sort of horror and awe at the apparent inadequacy of the creature's intelligence to its acts that one might have felt at seeing a toothless hag raise a ghost by an incantation. It was horribly...

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