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DAYTON PUBLIC LIBRARY.

REPORT OF LIBRARIAN

AND

LIBRARY BOARD

FOR THE PERIOD FROM MAY 1, 1891, TO SEPTEMBER 1,

1892.

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DAYTON LIBRARY BOARD.

HENRY C. MARSHALL, President.

W. J. CONKLIN, Vice President. JAMES A. MARLAY, Secretary.

GEORGE NEDER.

R. M. ALLEN.

FRANK CONOVER.

LIBRARY PORCE.

Miss MINTA I. DRYDEN, Librarian.

Miss ELECTRA C. DOREN, Assistant Librarian and Cataloguer.

Miss MINNIE E. ALTHOFF,
FRED H. Koch,

Library Assistants.
HARRY LYDENBERG,

HARRY FARLEY, Messenger.
A. P. FRAZIER, Janitor.,

REPORT OF THE LIBRARY BOARD.

Kecacs. 12-15-39. NDL for DF

To the Board of Education :

GENTLEMEN: In submitting to you a statement of the work of the Dayton Public Library for the period from May 1, 1891, to September 1, 1892, the Library Board desires to call your attention especially to the admirably arranged report of the librarian, showing in tabular form all those details necessary to a complete understanding of the uses made of the Library by its patrons. The librarian's efficient management has been well supplemented by the intelligent and conscientious labors of her assistants, whose experience and accurate knowledge of our books derived from long continuance upon the Library force, seem to us to justify the policy of this Board and its predecessors in recognizing faithful and satisfactory service by permanence of employment.

The circulation of works of fiction during the year ending May 1, 1892, was not equal to that of the preceding year. As one of the most serious problems confronting the management of every public library is the repression of a tendency to the indiscriminate reading of fiction, and particularly of juvenile fiction, to the exclusion of the better kinds of literature, the decrease in circulation in this direction is not a source of regret to this Board.

On the other hand, the number of consultations of books, magazines, and periodicals at the Library is constantly growing. During the year ending May 1, 1892, these consultations numbered 24,274, as against 19,483 for the preceding year; while for the four months ending September 1, 1892, the number was 10,078, showing a steady and gratifying increase. This we attribute largely to the greater activity in certain lines of study and research upon the part of the women of Dayton, whose literary clubs have done much to bring into circulation, and into use by way of consultation, many of the best books upon the Library shelves.

But the number of patrons of this, one of the most valuable and beneficent of our public institutions, is not what it should be.

In 'a community of 70,000 people, with seventeen public schools and 9,300 school children, a total enrollment of 5,872 borrowers of all ages seems to us to indicate upon the part of the public, if not a want of knowledge of the value of the Library, at least of proper appreciation of it. There is no family in Dayton whose members may not reap benefit from the stores of the Library; there is no private library so complete that it does not lack many of the productions of the best and brightest minds which

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