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certainly cannot be looked upon as improvements, being remarkable for an entire absence of humour, applicability, and polish. With the exception, perhaps, of Miss Horton's Ariel, the change in the cast serves only to institute a comparison which certainly redounds more to the glories of the past than the present.

With the glorious weather that has marked the beginning of the summer of fifty, VAUXHALL GARDENS should be mentioned as a place of popular resort. The director, Mr. Robert Wardle, is undefatigable in his exertions to provide entertainment of every description, consisting of music, both vocal and instrumental, with Alexander Lee as conductor; equestrianship, in which riders, foreign and British, figure to equal advantage ; panoramic views ; poses plastiques; fire works, with “novel effects" and " pyrotechnic displays,” that create the same amount of wonder and astonishment as in nights of yore ; and every delicacy which should, and should not, form an item of a post prandial banquet, both in the shape of edibles, and in the guise of the “generous” grape or the homely malt.

Balloons, with propitious winds and well-disposed Gales, have been ascending from CREMORNE GARDENS, where the public have flocked in numbers to partake of the entertainment liberally provided by Mr. Simpson, who, from his experience in catering for the taste of the town, is in a position to offer that which will satisfy the cravings of his visitors. Judging from the satisfaction hitherto expressed, the endeavours of the new lessee appear to be made in the right direction. Besides the singing and dancing-really the polkas gone through on these grounds must be spoken of as something beyond human belief_there is a portion of the programme of rather a startling nature, which, instead of incurring the dread of the visitors, is looked upon with the most unbounded enthusiasm. This has immediate reference to the “ daring” feats performed by Madame Antonio, who makes her ascent on the tight rope amidst the blaze of fireworks, which are continually “ going off” until this intrepid specimen of the feminine species reaches an altitude of we dare not say—for where are the bounds of such a perilous height, and an unpleasant position ?

THE FINE ART S.

"THE FATHERS OF THE PACK ;” and PORTRAIT OF RICHARD HILL,

Esq., OF THORNTON, WITH HIS HOUNDS.

We have here two more engraved subjects after paintings by the brothers Barraud, and both again devoted to the chase-a field in which the pair have now reached a very high standing. In the former of these two works are portrayed three favourite hounds from the Pytchley kennels–FAIRPLAY, HELICON, and WATCHMAN--and all of that grave, steady form and feature, so well carrying out the title of the print and the character of the fox-hound. Taking the merits of the picture on this latter consideration only, we have enough to rank it at once as a national work, for we never remember to have seen the English foxhound as he now is so correctly or becomingly delineated. The head of the hound WATCHMAN, for instance, is a picture in itself; and we have to congratulate the artist, Mr. W. Barraud, not only on the suc

cess with which he has painted him, but also on the opportunity of having so splendid a model to paint from. We have, too, further to express our gratification and approval of the fidelity and taste with which the original has been engraved by Davey, who, with all the care and talent that generally distinguish his plates, has never, in our opinion, perfected one that will speak more favourably for him than "THE FATHERS OF THE Pack."

The other plate gives us a varmint, workmanlike, old Yorkshire sportsman on his way to cover ; mounted on his favourite horse, and with four couple of hounds introduced. The painting, we find from a paragraph in the York Herald, has just been presented to Mr. Hill by his friends and neighbours, as a token of esteem and regard to one who has now kept hounds for forty years ; and, we believe, the engraving was determined on at the instance of the subscribers, who were each one anxious to have for himself so faithful a portrait of “the Squire.” The plate is likely to have more of a local than general reputation, as its truth and characteristic expression can only be fairly tested by those who know the man. In the north, however, we are told it is already highly approved ; and if sportsmanlike treatment and excellent “ getting up” can command success, our friends in Yorkshire and the adjacent counties will have no reason to be dissatisfied with “the copies " they are mounting. The engraving adds one more yet to Mr. Davey's score.

SPORTING INTELLIGENCE.

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THE ATHERSTONE Hunt.---The whole of this establishment came to the hammer on Monday, June 2nd. Mr. Tattersall officiating at his own home. The horses were remarkable for all being the same stamp and character-a very good and useful sort, though not quite so fashionable as we now and then see. The hounds realized upwards of eight hundred, an immense number of masters bidding for them. The hunters as under :Gs.

Gs. 1
Brown Stout ...... 205 XXX ......... 110 Trash
Paul Pry ........
175 Fairy

100 Butterfly ..
Old Port .........
170

100 Ringlet.... Juliet ...........

160
Cobham ..

90 Envoy ........
Forester ........
155 Sir Edward

84 Counsellor Clipper ............ 135

Pedlar ....

83 Flycatcher Black Dwarf ...... 130 Baron .......... 65 Jenny Lind .. Eaglet ............ 120 Robin Adair........ 64 Trinket............ 32 Pick pocket ........ 110 Prosody .......... 61 Jerry ............ 25

Mr. Baker's stud, from the Vale of Aylesbury, were put up on Monday, the 17th, and fetched very long prices ; being, in fact, a picked lot that one does not see every day.

PROSPECTS OF THE GROUSE SEAson.The uncommonly forward state of the birds by the 12th of August last year prevented the usual amount of destruction, and hence there was a much better stock preserved for breeding this season. The winter, although severe, was not observed to have been injurious to the birds ; but at pairing time the hens were found not to be in good condition, the effects of which may appear on the new broods. On early grounds, such as the Logie-almond Muirs, cheepers were first observed about the middle of May, and at Dalwhinnie

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about the 25th. Further north, hatching will likely be a few days later. The rains which fell in the latter half of the month were most opportune for the first broods; but if the present extreme heat and drought continue much longer, it must injuriously affect the young grouse at their most critical stage. By another fortnight we shall probably be able to report more decidedly as to the prospects of the ensuing season.

THE JOB AND POSTMASTERS' FUND.—The patrons and members of this now-flourishing institution held their seventh anniversary festival at the London Tavern on Friday, June 7. His Grace the Duke of Richmond, the president, took the chair, supported by the Hon. Mr. Pierrepont, and many other leading sportsmen, including a good sprinkling of masters of hounds, with Messrs. Tattersall, Collins, and all the chief dealers and jobmasters in town and country ; the only marked absentee being Mr. Richard Tattersall, the treasurer, from indisposition. A most agreeable evening was spent, during which the various statements offered by the committee and secretary showed the fund to be increasing very steadily and satisfactorily. Indeed, with the object in view, and the general respectability attached to it, we should be surprised if the Society did not progress; although we still think, with the Report, that it only requires to be more generally known to meet with far greater support. To assist in extending its worth we have much pleasure in giving it a notice in the magazine ; while, independent of its utility, the anniversary dinner to a sportsman must ever be a treat-the only thing against it being to point so far east at so late an hour in the day. Lord Strathmore was announced for next year's chairman ; when we would suggest “the meet” should be fixed somewhere more handy for visitors from “ the swell countries.” It is a long way to send on to now; though we must say there is the certainty of “a good thing" when you get there.

STATE OF THE ODDS.

The following are the chief " lots” for next year, as at present reported :

J. Scott's. DERBY.-Croupier, Crotchet, Storm, Goliah, Newminster, Ipsus, C. by

Charles XII. dam by Touchstone, Epira, C. by Epirus out of Emerald,

Presto. Oaks.-Frolicsome, Louie, F. by Kremlin out of Evening Star, F. by La

nercost out of Garland. St. LEGER.- Newminster, Ipsus, Epira, Hothorpe, F. by Lanercost out of

Garland, C. by Charles XII. dam by Touchstone, out of Languish, Crotchet, Croupier, Olympian, Storm, Goliah, Aubrey, Confidence, The Hungarian.

J. DAY's. DERBY.--Boabdil, Grecian, The Briton, Trunnion, Lamartine, Australind,

Knight of the Garter, Mungo, Eurus, New Forest Buck, XX. Oaks.-Christina, Prestige, Julia, Pussy (late Mignonne). Sr. LEGER.— The Briton, Julia, Boabdil, Grecian, Mungo, XX, Lamartine.

W. STEBBING's DERBY LOT. Lord Nelson, Guardsman, Peter the Great, Bermudian, Beningborough,

Tragedian (brother to Garrick), Bastinado, Palmerston, Kossuth, Georgia, Knook Knoll, Partridge, Rifle, England's Glory.

LORD EGLINTON's Derby Lot. Pandemus, Cnæus, Bonnie Dundee, Hippolytus, Juggernaut, Sardonyx.

A very indifferent settling for the Derby—a great deal worse, in reality, than the sufferers are inclined to admit-coupled with an Ascot week that put but few right again, has not much tended to increase the amount of interest on events some way still in perspective. The passing clouds, such as the Emperor's and Northumberland Plates, have had by far the best of it, our standing dishes of Derby and Leger being only occasionally ventured on. For the latter Lord Zetland's horse continues naturally first favourite, though we fancy his position is anything but a firm one; and we shall not be surprised to see him at much longer odds before the race. Clincher, on the other hand, since his removal to John Scott's, has a very rising look; and we would caution our friends how they stand “ agen" him. Should he continue well, it promises to be most awkward getting out. Beyond these two, we have only to notice a favourable feeling for the Italian, though nothing very remarkable as yet, and a declaration that Bolingbroke will not be sold till after the Leger, his dam and the rest of the stud coming to the hammer on the 15th. A fine opportunity is so afforded those who believe the Derby to have been a mistake, or something worse, of getting on again, though, so far, they show but little anxiety to avail themselves of long odds and a sure start.

The Derby of Fifty-one has scarcely yet a presentable appearance. John Day, however, with Grecian, and The Tartan," with Hippolytus, lead off ; while John Scott once more finds a “ lot” worth mentioning. For Goodwood the Stake and Cup are both so fresh in the market, that we have nothing to add to the latest particulars" we furnish.

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EMBELLISHMENTS.

RHEDYCINA; WINNER OF THE OAKS, 1850.

ENGRAVED BY E. HACKER, FROM A PAINTING BY HARRY HALL,

AND

“ HALF SPRUNG."

ENGRAVED DY S. LACEY, FROM A PAINTING BY

EBNER.

CONTENTS

DIARY FOR AUGUST
The RACING IN JULY.—BY CRAVEN

SCOTLAND AND THE MOORS.—BY POXGLOVE
OTTER HUNTING.-BY GELERT

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WINNING A WAGER.-BY VENATOR

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SEAT ON HORSEBACK.--BY HARRY HIEOVER
RHEDYCINA, WINNER OF Tie Oaks, 1850.-BY CASTOR
SEA FISHING.-BY LORD WILLIAM LENNOX
“HALF SPRUNG.—BY OXONIAN
STRAY SHOTS.—BY RAMROD .
LITERATURE-FIVE YEARS OF A IIUNTER'S LIFE
PUBLIC AMUSEMENTS OF THE YETROPOLIS
STATE OF THE ODDS, &c.

. 128 . 129 . 139 . 143 . 146

TAE TURP REGISTER: PLYMOUTH AND DEVONPORT SPRING

MEETING – CHESTER SPRING MEETING - NEWMARKET
SECOND SPRING MEETING-SHREWSBURY-LOTHIANS RAC-
ING CLUB AND EDINBURGH-HARPENDEN-MANCHESTER
-EPSOM-NEWPORT

27-46

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