Imagens das páginas
PDF
ePub

ourselves to discuss its doctrines more attempted to become a teacher of new length.

doctrines under the form of entertaining With the previous works of M. Sue, the romances; the same may be predicated of public are so well acquainted, that it is D’Israeli, whose Coningsby and Sibel, almost needless for us to call attention to however satisfactory and adinirable in the his great characteristic merits-namely, a eyes of the few, are yet caviare to the vast power of creating and carrying on a general—and the same is the case, in a yet strong interest ; a vivid and gorgeous greater degree, with Mr. Ward, whose facility of description; and above all, an Tremaine and other ethico-moral novela almost unrivalled power of working up were tolerated and lauded only because single and isolated scenes--or to his equally less dull than might have been expected great characteristic defects, a constant under the circumstances. straining for effect; a total neglect of the In this view of the case, therefore, it is natural; a very slender capacity of elabo- in no wise wonderful that M. Sae should rating individual character; and above all, have failed as signally; but the other and a lamentable proneness to wiredraw his perhaps principal cause to which we altri plots; to protract the interest of his narra- bute his failure, is the fatal form which he tive, until it ceases to be interest, and to has adopted for the publication of his latter spin out his scenes by the introduction of works--the contracts to furnish a chapter the most trivial and futile descriptions of daily for a given, or even for an unlimited, the entrance of this valet or that soubrette, time; rendering it the interest of the author the style of his bow, or the fashion of her and publisher alike to spin out usque ad dress, and the like, until the reader is nauseam anything, which the populace weary and exhausted with endless verbiage will tolerate, without regard to its intrinsic and repetition.

merit, or to the censure of the judicious, To all this criticism the Wandering Jew whom it makes to grieve. is especially liable; more so indeed than

We state it unhesitatingļy, as our opinion, that any of his former works. There is in it, this work, (the Wandering Jew) would be improved moreover, a discursiveness, arising from the which, we are told to say, might be done without re great number of different groups and trenching one iota from the machinery of the story, underplots connected by the very slen- without abbreviating one striking scene, or losing derest thread of common union, which one luminous idea.

It could not, however, hare been effected conobliges the author constantly to repeat himself, recounting in elaborate summaries the sistently with M. Sue's object, of receiving an facts and events related many chapters tiousness and irreligion to the Vadauds of Paris ; of before, in order to enable the reader to with M. Veron's scheme of obtaining an immers

addition to the subscription lists of the Coostitution understand what is going forward.

nel, and when obtained, of retaining them for yet a As a work of art, therefore, we rank it second year, by the indefinite protraction of the lower than any of the larger productions of story. our author; and, indeed, when we regard Such things are to be regretted; but it the many and extraordinary licenses taken has been, and probably ever will be, the to himself-the introduction of a direct case, that authors, ignorant of their true supernatural agency, allowing him to deal policy, will ruin their future, and destroy with all sorts of improbabilities and im- their reputation, by grasping at too much possibilities at will, in the midst of the in the present, most artificial society and highest cultiva- This said, admitting always that there are tion the world has hitherto witnessed ; the very many scenes in the Wandering Jew, fearful occurrence of the cholera with all of neat force, of real pathos, requiring the its train of horrors ; the rapid change of genius of a master to conceive, and such a times and scenes, and the almost endless ihere is scarce any living writer capable varieties of characters and persons—when of attempting, we take our leave of the we regard all this, and then observe how Wandering Jew, as viewed in relation to little is effected with her great means, we

its literary merits. must esteem it, in an artistical view, as little We shall proceed now to look at it as a better than a failure.

political and social regenerator; in fact, &s This may, we think, be attributed to an actual and practical illustration of the two distinct causes ; one, that the author good or evil which Fourierism would inflict has neglected the execution of the work, upon the world. as a work of art, regarding it himself, The plot of the Wandering Jew is merely as a vehicle for the doctrines of simple, singularly simple, when we reflecs which he has recently become so strenuous that the book itself consists of no less than a supporter. And here we would remark 668 pages of the closest type, containing a that no novelist or romancer has ever yet bulk of printed matter not much inferior succeeded, to any great extent, in com- to one half of Hume's History of England, bining avowed didacticism with high lite- or the whole of Bancroft’s History of the rary excellence. Bulwer, himself, the United States. most dazzling and popular writer of fiction

In brief, it is as follows:-in the year Joel ose who has flourished in latter years, failed

Count Marius de Rennepont, a Huguenot sentenced

to the millons under the iniquitous edicts which G

[ocr errors][ocr errors]

1845.)
The Wandering Jew.

pecially persecuted by the company of Jesuits, com- able machinery, on the wide ramifications, or
mitted suicide, leaving 50,000 crowns in the hands of the infinite changes of scenes, characters, and
2 Jewish family to be put out by father, son, and grand persons, we have neither the space nor the in-
son, on interest and compound interest for 150 years ; clination to descant; the rather as in them there
of that time, the product shall be divided, at a certain is comparatively speaking little that bears on
hour and a certain place, among such of his descen- our purpose, the evolution of the true aims and
dants as shall then and there present themselves, pro- objects of this dangerous and unchristian book.
vided each with credentials and a mysterious medal, In the first place, we shall proceed to point

This Count Marius de Rennepont proves to be a de
scendant of the Wandering Jew, who was, M. Sue tells work is levelled at the Jesuits alone, no other

out that, although the direct censure of this
us, a mechanic of Jerusalem, condemned, for brutal christian sect or priesthood is alluded to at all;
to roam the world until his second coming. All the Jesuitism being held up as the religion, the
descendants, therefore, of the Count Marius de Renne- sole religion, of that social order, which it is the
pont are descendants likewise of the mysterious Jew; writer's avowed object to put down.
who, aided by an equally mysterious Wandering Jew. Again, and still in this connection, we shall
ess, the daughter of Herodias, extends his aid to them observe, that of all the persons represented in
often effectually for the moment, but always, fruit- the Wandering Jew, as Christian believers,
lessly as regards the main result.
This main result is the establishment of an order or

all are held up to view as utterly odious, atroassociation for benevolent and philanthropic purposes,

cious, and infamous ; criminals, hypocrites, of all of these descendants, possessed of almost unlimit liars, adulterers and assassins; with but two wealth, the product of the 50,000 crowns at 150 years exceptions, the one of whom is an old doating of usance ; who are destined to act forever as oppo woman, and the second a priest, the Abbe Gauents to order or association of evil, in other words, briel, who, as we are rather profanely told, is to the Company of Jesuits immediately, and mediately the direct type of Christ on earth ; concerning to the whole existing order of things, social and moral, whose Christianity we have something more civil and religous.

to observe anon.
As the story opens, these facts break upon us
gradually; and we discover that the surviving de-

As to the principles of association, we shall scendants, at the expiration of 150 years, are seven in find out what these are, from observing the number-namely, Rose and Blanche Simon, twins of principles of the descendants, who are to be 15 years, the offspring of a marriage between Marechal the propagandists thereof, every one of whom Simon, a soldier of the grand army, and a Polish lady, is represented as perfectly virtuous, good, and surnamed the Pearl of Warsaw, for her virtues and worthy of all imitation, with but a single exbeauty-Prince Djalma, a Hindu half breed, the off ception, Jacques Rennepont, the mechanic, Kadja Sing, and a French lady of Batavia-Adrienne who is described as naturally good but misled to de Cardoville, daughter of the late Count of Cardo- evil, still capable of great, good things, and ville, a patrician girl of exquisite beauty, worth, and by no means as an evil or depraved personage. accomplishment, the most benevolent and admirable We shall now review these descendants of of beings, and par excellence the heroine of the work the Jew, and founders, that are to be, of that -Jacques Rensepont, a drunken debauched mechan. divine order of association, which is to extinphilanthropic manufacturer, the best of men, who has guish all the sorrows and all the sins of hu

manity, and to render all men happy, and bein force for the benefit of his workmen--and

lastly, the cause happy, therefore virtuous. Since, acAbbe Gabriel, who has been entrapped into becoming cording to the creed of M. Sue and his disciples, a member of the order of Jesus ; and through whom it is misery alone that wakes men wicked. that order expects to gain possession of the whole leg. First, then, we have Mademoiselle Blanche, acy, which amounts, as we find further on in the and Rose Simon, educated to their fifteenth narration, to the prodigious suin of two hundred and year by their mother, the Pearl of Warsaw, twelve millions of francs.

This premised, the whole interest of the plot lies the best and most virtuous of women. in the mutual struggles of the Jesuits to acquire, and

[graphic]

Of these young ladies, whose characters by the descendants to retain their inheritance. the way are very exquisitely conceived and

The Jesuits having the advantage of a thorough wrought out as types of simplicity and innoknowledge of all the facts, transmitted to them cence, we are speedily told that they believed through their archives; and the descendants, aided “thut the gracious God, who is ever merciful by their supernatural, and almost ubiquitous assistants, the Jew and Herodias.

to those poor mothers, who have left their The whole story is resolved, therefore, at once, listen to them

from the height of heaven.”

children in this world, would permit her to into a contest, as M. Sue and the Fourierist party would have us believe, between the supporters of as

To counterbalance which, we are told that sociation and the faction of Jesuits ; or, as we assert, their guide, the excellent, faithful, and inimibetween the principles of association and the princi- table Dagobert, did not share in the least, this ples of Christianity at large.

consolatory illusion.”—p. 14, vol. 1. This contest, by the way, is carried on first, by We further glean, from the intermediate physical means on the part of the Jesuits, in order to prevent any of the heirs, save Gabriel, 'from

being pages, that the extent of their simple and present at the opening of the will; and secondly, by existence of a God, of the immortality of the moral means, viz. the destroying of the whole family through the play of their own passions without any soul, and of the ministry of archangels'; but in outward assault, or the commission of auy overt the 186th page we find this all-sufficient crime.

passage. The first of these modes fails entirely; the second is entirely successful. The whole family is destroy- “Yesterday morning I requested them to say their ed, with the exception of Gabriel only; and the prayers ; and I learned from them with as much alarm Jesuits thus conquer the inheritance, which is res- as regret, that they knew none of the mysteries of our cued from their hands only by the artifice of the old faith, although they are fifteen years of age." Jew, its guardian, who consigns the assets to the flames, and thus cheats the cheaters.

And these children educated to that age by In conclusion, the Jew and Jewess, their term of un

a most pious and virtuous mother, who, we having arrived, ath the extinction learn, however, in another place was an esprit

fort, or in other words, a disbeliever in revealed

31

.

ml bany.

ourselves to discuss its doctrines more at tempted to become a teacher of new length.

doctrines under the form of entertaining With the previous works of M. Sue, the romances; the same may be predicated of public are so well acquainted, that it is D’Israeli, whose Coningsby and Sibyl, almost needless for us to call attention to however satisfactory and admirable in the his great characteristic merits-namely, a eyes of the few, are yet caviade to the vast power of creating and carrying on a general-and the same is the case, in a yet strong interest ; a vivid and gorgeous greater degree, with Mr. Ward, whose facility of description; and above all, an Tremaine and other ethico-moral novela almost unrivalled power of working up were tolerated and lauded only because single and isolated scenes-or to his equally less dull than might have been expected great characteristic defects, a constant under the circumstances. straining for effect; a total peglect of the In this view of the case, therefore, it is natural; a very slender capacity of elabo- in no wise wonderful that M. Sae should rating individual character; and above all, have failed as signally; but the other and a lamentable proneness to wiredraw his perhaps principal cause to which we attriplots; to protract the interest of his narra- bute his failure, is the fatal form which he tive, until it ceases to be interest, and to has adopted for the publication of his latter spin out his scenes by the introduction of works—the contracts to furnish a chapter the most trivial and futile descriptions of daily for a given, or even for an unlimited, the entrance of this valet or that soubrette, time; rendering it the interest of the author the style of his bow, or the fashion of her and publisher alike to spin out usque ad dress, and the like, until the reader is nauseam anything, which the populace weary and exhausted with endless verbiage will tolerate, without regard to its intrinsie and repetition.

merit, or to the censure of the judicious, To all this criticism the Wandering Jew whom it makes to grieve. is especially liable; more so indeed than We state it unhesitatingly, as our opinion, that any of his former works. There is in it, this work, (the Wandering Jew,) would be improved

ten-fold if three-fifths of its bulk were pruned away; moreover, a discursiveness, arising from the great number of different groups and which we are bold to say, might be done without te underplots connected by the very slen- without abbreviating one striking scene, or losing derest thread of common union, which one luminous idea. obliges the author constantly to repeat him-sistently with M. Sue's object,

of receiving a

It could not, however, have been effected cos. self, recounting in elaborate summaries the enormous sum for ministering a daily dose or licesfacts and events related many chapters tiousness and irreligion to the Vedouds of Paris ; or before, in order to enable the reader to with M. Veron's scheme of obtaining an immense understand what is going forward.

addition to the subscription lists of the Constitution

nel, and when obtained, of retaining them for yet a As a work of art, therefore, we rank it second year, by the indefinite protraction or the lower than any of the larger productions of story. our author ; and, indeed, when we regard Such things are to be regretted ; but it the many and extraordinary licenses taken has been, and probably ever will be, the to himself-the introduction of a direct case, that authors, ignorant of their tree supernatural agency, allowing him to deal policy, will ruin their future, and destroy with all sorts of improbabilities and im- their reputation, by grasping at too much possibilities at will, in the midst of the in the present. most artificial society and highest cultiva- This said, admitting always that there are tion the world has hitherto witnessed ; the very many scenes in the Wandering Jew, fearful occurrence of the cholera with all of neat force, of real pathos, requiring the its train of horrors; the rapid change of genius of a master to conceive, and such as times and scenes, and the almost endless there is scarce any living writer capable varieties of characters and persons when of attempting, we take our leave of the we regard all this, and then observe how Wandering Jew, as viewed in relation to little is effected with her great means, we its literary merits. must esteem it, in an artistical view, as little We shall proceed now to look at it as a better than a failure.

political and social regenerator ; in fact, as This may, we think, be attributed to an actual and practical illustration of the two distinct causes; one, that the author good or evil which Fourierism would inflict has neglected the execution of the work, upon the world. as a work of art, regarding it himself,

The plot of the Wandering Jews merely as a vehicle for the doctrines of simple, singularly simple, when we reflect which he has recently become so strenuous that the book itself consists of no less than a supporter. And here we would remark 668 pages of the closest type, containing a that no novelist or romancer has ever yet bulk of printed matter not much inferier succeeded, to any great extent, in com- to one half of Hume's History of England, bining avowed didacticism with high lite or the whole of Bancrofts History of the rary, excellence. Bulwer, himself, the United States. most dazzling and popular writer of fiction

In brier, it is as follows:

in the year 19eg er who has flourished in latter years, failed

Count Marius de Rennepont, a Huguenot sentenced

ou maden the iniquitous cdict which

[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]

1845.]
The Wandering Jew.

pecially persecuted by the company of Jesuits, com- able machinery, on the wide ramifications, or
mitted suicide, leaving 50,000 crowns in the hands of the infinite changes of scenes, characters, and
a Jewish family to be put out by father, son, and grand persons, we have neither the space nor the in-
son, on interest and compound interest for 150 years ; clination to descant; the rather as in them there
together with a will desiring that, at the expiration
of that time, the product shall be divided, at a certain is comparatively speaking little that bears on
hour and a certain place, among such of his descen- our purpose, the evolution of the true aims and
dants as shall then and there present themselves, pro- objects of this dangerous and unchristian book.
vided each with credentials and a mysterious medal. In the first place, we shall proceed to point

This Count Marius de Rennepont proves to be a de out that, although the direct censure of this
scendant of the Wandering Jew, who was, M. Sue tells
us, a mechanic of Jerusalem, condemned, for brutal

work is levelled at the Jesuits alone, no other
atrocity toward the Saviour while bearing his cross, Jesuitism being held up as the religion, the

christian sect or priesthood is alluded to at all;
descendants, therefore, of the Count Marius de Renne- sole religion, of that social order, which it is the
pont are descendants likewise of the mysterious Jew; writer's avowed object to put down.
who, aided by an equally mysterious Wandering Jewe Again, and still in this connection, we shall
ess, the daughter of Herodias, extends his aid to them observe, that of all the persons represented in
often effectually for the moment, but always, fruit- the Wandering Jew, as Christian believers,
lessly as regards the main result.
This main result is the establishment of an order or cious, and infamous ; criminals, hypocrites,

all are held up to view as utterly odious, atro-
association for benevolent and philanthropic purposes,
of all of these descendants, possessed of almost unlimit liars, adulterers and assassins ; with but two
wealth, the product of the 50,000 crowns at 150 years exceptions, the one of whom is an old doating
of usance ; who are destined to act forever as oppo woman, and the second a priest, the Abbe Ga-
uents to order or association of evil, in other words, briel, who, as we are rather profanely told, is
to the Company of Jesuits immediately, and mediately the direct type of Christ on earth ; concerning
to the whole existing order of things, social and moral, whose Christianity we have something more
civil and religous.

to observe anon.
As the story opens, these facts break upon us
gradually; and we discover that the surviving de-

As to the principles of association, we shall scendants, at the expiration of 150 years, are seven in

find out what these are, from observing the number-namely, Rose and Blanche Simon, twins of principles of the descendants, who are to be 15 years, the offspring of a marriage between Marechal the propagandists thereof, every one of whom Simon, a soldier of the grand army, and a Polish lady, is represented as perfectly virtuous, good, and surnamed the Pearl of Warsaw, for her virtues and worthy of all imitation, with but a single exbeauty-Prince Djalma, a Hindu half breed, the off ception, Jacques Rennepont, the mechanic, spring of a marreage between the King of Mundi, who is described as naturally good but misled to de Cardoville, daughter of the late Count of Cardo- evil, still capable of great, good things, and ville, a patrician girl of exquisite beauty, worth, and by no means as an evil or depraved personage. accomplishment, the most benevolent and admirable We shall now review these descendants of of beings, and par excellence the heroine of the work the Jew, and founders, that are to be, of that -Jacques Rensepont, a drunken debauched mechan. divine order of association, which is to extinic, surnamed Gu-co-bed-naked--Mr. Francis Hardy, a guish all the sorrows and all the sins of hudiscovered the principles of association, and put them manity, and to render all men happy, and bein force for the benefit of his workmen--and lastly, the cause happy, therefore virtuous. Since, acAbbe Gabriel, who has been entrapped into becoming cording to the creed of M. Sue and his disciples, a member of the order of Jesus ; and through whom it is misery alone that wakes men wicked! that order expects to gain possession of the whole leg. First, then, we have Mademoiselle Blanche, acy, which amounts, as we find further on in the and Rose Simon, educated to their fifteenth narration, to the prodigious suin of two hundred and twelve millions of francs.

year by their mother, the Pearl of Warsaw, This premised, the whole interest of the plot lies the best and most virtuous of women. an the mutual struggles of the Jesuits to acquire, and

Of these young ladies, whose characters by the descendants to retain their inheritance.

the way are very exquisitely conceived and The Jesuits having the advantage of a thorough wrought out as types of simplicity and innoknowledge of all the facts, transmitted to them cence, we are speedily told that they believed through their archives; and the descendants, aided " that the gracious God, who is ever merciful by their supernatural, aud almost ubiquitous assist

to those poor mothers, who have left their ants, the Jew and Herodias. The whole story is resolved, therefore, at once, listen to them

from the height of heaven.”.

children in this world, would permit her to into a contest, as M. Sue and the Fourierist party would have us believe, between the supporters of as

To counterbalance which, we are told that sociation and the faction of Jesuits; or, as we assert, their guide, the excellent, faithful, and inimibetween the principles of association and the princi- table Dagobert, "did not share in the least, this ples of Christianity at large.

consolatory illusion.”—p. 14, vol. 1. This contest, by the way, is carried on first, by We further glean, from the intermediate physical means on the part of the Jesuits, in order to Prevent any of the heirs, save Gabriel, 'from being pages, that the extent of their simple and

present at the opening of the will ; and secondly, by touching creed,' was a vague belief in the moral means, víz. the destroying of the whole family existence of a God, of the immortality of the through the play of their own passions without

any soul, and of the ministry of archangels; but in outward assault, or the commission of auy overt the 186th page we find this all-sufficient crime. The first of these modes fails entirely; the second

passage. is entirely successful. The whole family is destroy- “ Yesterday morning I requested them to say their ed, with the exception of Gabriel only; and the prayers ; and I learned from them with as much alarm Jesuits thus conquer the inheritance, which is res- as regret, that they knew none of the mysteries of our cued from their hands only by the artifice of the old faith, although they are fifteen years of age.” Jew, its guardian, who consigns the assets to the flames, and thus cheats the cheaters.

And these children educated to that age by In conclusion, the Jew and Jewess, their term of un- a most pious and virtuous mother, who, we thluderings having arrived, with the extinction learn, however, in another place was an esprit Of Prince Djalma it is needless to speak; contemplation of a bronze statue of the Indian not a word from the beginning to the end of Bacchus, bearing, it seems, some resemblance the book intimates that he has any creed or to the bronze beauty of the Hindu ? faith at all, unless the abandoning himself to Hereafter we shall not so greatly marvel all the sensual instincts and impulses of a that she resolves, with the full concurrence of naturally noble savage, never once refraining her best friend and relation, the Count de from any act of violence through any motive Montbron, on marrying this yellow man! of reason, or doing any virtuous act save To any mind, not purified by the regenerathrough kind impulse, can be called a faith. ting influences of Fourierism, this in itself, we

and happy.

fort, or in other words, a disbeliever in revealed mouth of a pure and virtuous woman An accidental interview is brought about Adrienne de Cardoville loquitur: between these creatures; both virgin as we are repeatedly told; both in the highest degree tion ; and to the eyes of the world in which we are

[graphic]

Jacques Rennepont is a mere sot, a vulgar should suppose, would be sufficiently revoltvoluptuary and debauchee, giving no proofing, decked out, as it is, with all that is most of knowledge that he has a soul at all, unless voluptuous in words, most prurient in imathe proof lie in his sometimes swearing by it. gination, most sensual and lascivious in detail

M. Hardy, that best of men, that pure phil. So true is this last censure, that the adventures anthropist ; that benevolent, consistent, chasita. of the Chevalier Faublas, and les liasons dan ble being, is an habitual adulterer; is moreover gereuses, are pure and spotless, when comone of those we quote from page 556, vol. ii

. pared with some scenes in this work. -who "had adopted that generous, natural Scenes, rendered doubly dangerous to innoreligion, which preaches a grateful adoration cence and truth, by the fact that they are held of God, a love for all humanity, a worship of up to the admiration of the world as actions all that is just and good, and which, disdain- of the good, the noble, and the just; such as, ful of all dogmas, professes the same venera. to quote an old English poet: tion for Marcus Aurelius us for Confucius, “ Smell sweet and blossom in the dest; for Plato as for Jesus Christ, for Moses as for held up to the imitation of all men, as the part Lycurgus."

We are not, therefore, astonished at discov. and parcel of that social regeneration, which ering that in his association of workmen, is to render the whole world good and happy. though he has provided all means for their

For M. Sae, however, and his co-disciples, bodily comfort, even concert halls, and bal}

or co-propagandists rather, this is not half rooms, he has allowed no chapel to exist for enough; and he has literally racked his brains prayer of thanksgiving—it being distinctly to find, even than this lowest depth, a lower held up, thronghout this atrocious work, thus deep; and, with a vengeance, he has found it. a to labor is to pray,” and “to indulge the divine fore discover the adorable, retined, delicate,

In the 632, and following pages, we thereinstincts," --in other words, the sensual passions, and virtuous Adrienne de Cardoville, holding which are so termed, not once but fitty times --the most fit adoration of the most high God. the following language; and arguing, to the

We now come to Adrienne de Cardoville, astonishment, even, of her Hindu ball-breed, wbo, up to the beginning of the second vol against the ordinance of marriage, which she ume, in spite of her atheism, worship of heath

is too conscientions to undergo; and the suben statues of ideal beauty, and vagaries as to

stitution for it of concubinage, dissoluble on the rights of women, is really a delightful, at

weariness, which she is very anxious to un tractive, and charming creature; the picture of dertake, as soon as she can discover some all tbat mere humanity can be, of delicacy, vir

means of reconciling her peculiar views to the tue, and highmindedness.

prejudices of the world. From an act of kindness and charity this

In corroboration of our views, we bere quote, lovely girl becomes the secret protectress of what we conceive to be as distinct an attack Prince Djalma, her cousin, a mulatto, or Hin.

on the ordinance of matrimony, as we have du half breed, who is described as a very noble,

ever read, rendered doubly dangerous, and natural savage, and a very handsome yellow doubly disgusting, by being placed in the

“But to this love there is yet wanting a consecra sensual, as we are repeatedly told ; and one,

called upon to live, there is but one-marriage, and Adrienne, in the highest degree delicate.

that chains up the whole life." During this first interview, the following Djalma gazed at the young girl in astonishment. scene occurs-p. 377 :

“ Yes! the whole life; and yet, who is he that

can be answerable for ever for the sentiments of his Djalma, at the first movement of Adrienne,

whole life ?" resumed the young girl. “A God sho made a vast bound toward her, like that of a

should know the futurity of the heart's history, tiger on the prey, which an enemy would should alone link together certain beings intissalo sua ch from him. The young girl, terrified by bly, so as to insure their happiness. But, alas! to the expression of ferocious ardor, which in. the eyes of humanity the future is impenetrable flamed all the features of the Indian, cast her. Therefore, when one can only answer with certain self back, uttering a loud outcry of dis- ty of a present sentiment, is he not committing a may--"

mad, a selfish, an impious action, who takes on buss And well she might ; for we can imagine self an indissoluble tie ?". nothing more inconceivably disgusting to any

* It is sad to think so," replied Djalma, after a woman, even bad she nó refinement, than looked at the young girl with an expression of su

moment's reflection, but it is just." Thea ža such an exhibition of brutal, goatish passion. prise, that still grew greater every moment. But wbat is our wonder, when we find-see Adrienne, therefore, hastened to say in a voice pp. 429 and seq.--that the adorable Adrienne expressive of infinite tenderness : is impressed by no disgust; bat, on the con

* Do not misunderstand what I intend to say, sy trary, imbibes equal passion, equally animal,

dearest friend ; the love of two beings, who, like as eqnally disgusting, from this interview; and

after a thousand experiments of heart, of soul, an! of intellect, have found in each other all the asso

that headiness which we desire

man.

00

1

f volun.

« AnteriorContinuar »