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CONTENTS.

FAOE8

Introductory ........ 1-24

SCCTTOK

I.—Baptism A Divine Institution. .... I

TI.—Baptism A New Testament Institution ... 2

III.—Baptism A Permanent Institution . . . 3-5

IV.—On The Element Of Baptism .... 5-7

"V.—On Baptism As An Initiatory Ordinance . . . 8-10

VI.—Baptism Not A Converting And Saving Ordinance . 10-12

VTL—Baptism A Practical And Probably A Clearly-revealed

Ordinance . . . . . . 12-21

VTJI.—On Baptism As A Positive Institution, And From This

Further Probability Of Explicit Revelation On The

Subject ....... 21-24

IMPORT OF BAPTISM.

I.—Preparatory And Philological Remarks . . . 25-36

IX—On Evidence From Greek Lexicons . . . 36-42

LTL—On Evidence From Greek Writers . . . 42-69

IV.—On Evidence From Ancient Versions . . . 70-75

V.—On Evidence From TnE Practice Of The Greeks And

The Greek Church . . . . . 75-79

VI.—On Evidence From The Proselyte Baptism Of The Jews 80-86

VTL—On Evidence From The Concessions Of P^dobaptists . 86-99

VTJI.—On Evidence From The Figurative Use Of Baptize And

Baptism ....... 100-103

IX.—On Evidence From Associated Words . . . 103-107

X.—On Evidence From The Distinct And Wide Difference

Of Import Betwixt Immerse, Pour, And Sprinkle . 108-112

XL—On Evidence From Invariable Adaptation . . 113-124

XII.—On Historic Evidence . . . . . . 124-164

1.—From Holy Writ 125, 126

2.—From Apostolic Contemporaries and their Immediate

Successors . . . . . . 126-128

1—From the Greeks and the Greek Church . .128, 129

4.—From Ancient Baptisteries, Ritual Regulations, and

Confessions . . . . . 129-138

5. —From the Acknowledgments of Numerous Pcedobap-

tists 138-153

6.—From the Concessions of Peedobaptist Historians . 153-160

SECTION PAGES

XIII.—On Evidence Fkom The Futility Ok All Known Objections 164-554

§ 1.—Futility of Peedobaptist Philological Objections . 165-194

§ 2.—Futility of Objections from Christ's Baptism of

Sufferings ..... 194-199

§ 3.—Futility of Objections from the Baptism of the

Spirit . . . . . 199-224

§ 4.—Futility of Objections from the Baptism of Israel 224-244

§ 5.—Futility of Objections from Burial by and in Bap-

tism ...... 244-279

§ 6.—Futility of Objections from 1 Peter iii. 20, 21 . . 279-282

§ 7.—Futility of Objections from Prepositions . . 282-331

„ „ „ the Preposition en . 283-302

„ „ „ the Preposition eis . 302-315

„ ,, ,, the Preposition <£• . 315-331

§ 8.—Futility of Objectious from Johu's Baptizing in

.Enon ...... 331-339

§ 9.—Futility of Objections from the Multitude Baptized

by John . . . . . . 339-355

§ 10.—Futility of Objectious from Mark vii. 4, 8; Luke

xi. 38; and Heb. ix. 10 . . . . 355-390

§ 11.—Futility of Objections from Christ's Commission . 390-394

§ 12.—Futility of Objections from the Baptism of the

Three Thousand . . ... 394-414

§ 13.—Futility of Objections to the Immersion of the

Samaritans ..... 414-421

§ 14.—Futility of Objections to the Iuirueraion of the

Eunuch . . . . . . 421-423

§ 15.—Futility of Objectious to the Immersion of Paul . 423-426

§ 16.—Futility of Objections to the Immersion of Cornelius 427-432

§ 17.—Futility of Objections to the immersion of Lydia . 432-435

§ 18.—Futility of Objections to the Immersion of the

Jailor 435-441

§ 19.—Futility of Objections from Eph. iv. 5 . . . 442, 443

§20.—Futility of Objections from Heb. vi. 2 . . 443 —

§ 21.—Futility of Objections from Heb. x. 19-22; Titus

iii. 5; Eph. v. 26; and John iii. 6 . . . 444-440

§ 22.—Futility of Objections from Old Testament Pro-

phecies ...... 446 - 449

§ 23.—Futility of Objectious from Occasional Impractica-
bility. . . .• . . .

§ 24.—Futility of Objections from Supposed Danger
§ 25.—Futility of Objections from Alleged Indecency
§ 26.—Futility of Objections from Inconvenience and
Alleged Inexpedicnce . . . .

§ 27.—Futility of Objectious from Presumed Moral Ends

§ 28. — Futility of Objections from Hosca vi. 6

§ 29.—Futility of Objections from Supposed Substantial

Obedience iu Sprinkling . . 482-485

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SECTION pAOBg

XIII.—On Evidence From The Futility Ok All Known Objections 164-554

§ 30.—Futility of Objections from Supposed Primitive

Exceptions ..... 486, 487

ji 31.—Futility of the Objection that Sprinkling is not

Forbidden . . . . 488, 489

§ 32.—Futility of the Objection from the Stringeut Adhe-

rence by Baptists to Immersion . . . 489-503

? 33.—Futility of the Objection that Baptism is Circum-

stantial and Unimportant^ . . /tf . . 503-516

§ 34.—Futility of Objections from Stark xvi. **» and 1

Cor. L 14-17 .... 516-523

§ 35.—Futility of the Objection that Baptists allow of

Deviations from God's Word . . . 523-526

§ 36.—Futility of the Objection from the Admission of

Women to the Lord's Table

I 37.—Futility of Sundry Less Frequent Objections .

1.—On Evidence from the Fathers .....

i—On the Wishing of a Part for the Whole . . .

3.—On One Person Immersing Another ....

4—On Dipping, Ponring, or Sprinkling a Sign of Cleansing and

of Spiritual Blessings

5 —On Alleged Assumptions by Baptists ....

6—On Dr. Johnson's Definition of Baptize and Baptism

7—On Evidence from Carved and Painted Representations of

Baptism 637, 638

S.—On the Practice of the First Thirteen Hundred Years, as

Coming Down to us Through a Popish Channel
9.—On the Silence of Scripture, and on the Burden of Proof
10.—On the Fewness of the Baptists ....

§ 38—Futility of Objections Relating to the Practice of

Immersion rather than to the Meaning of Baptizo 541-554

1.—On Not Being an Anabaptist . . 641, 542

C—On the Reflection that would be cast by Present Immersion

on Previous Sentiments and Practice

3.—On the Sufficiency of having Received the Thing Signified

by Baptism

4.—On not Feeling the Conscience to Demand Immersion

5.—On Baptism as not Essential to Salvation .

<>.—On a Scriptural Observance of this Ordinance as Adapted

under Existing Circumstances to Diminish Usefulness . 553, 654

ADDITA.

I.—Ox The Desion Of Baptism .... 555-559

IL—On The Utility Of Baptism . . . . 559-566

III.—Oar The Importance Of Baptism .... 566-573

IV.—Some Concluding Remarks . . . . . 573-584
APPENDIX I.

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INTRODUCTORY.

SECTION I.

BAPTISM A DIVINE INSTITUTION.

J. A. James.—"OGod! T render Thee my sincere and hearty thanks for the sacred Scriptures, that inestimable Tolume. which is given by Thine inspiration, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness; that the man of God may be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good works. May I consider Thy Word the only infallible standard of truth; and turning from all human authority, however I may avail myself of the teaching of uninspired men, may I determine to receive nothing as truth which is not taught here, and everything as truth which is taught here. Give me an enlightened understanding, and lead me into a knowledge of Thy will."—Chris. FaUier's Prcs., p. 27.

Sf-asdkr.—"We must follow not the spirit of the age, but the Spirit of God."—His. of Chris. Dogrn'u, p. 10, Bonn's Edition.

Dr. Laxrcuii-D.—•' Watch the errors of your times and neighbourhood. "—Counsels to if in., p. 48. *

That baptism has been enjoined by the highest authority, whatever may be the import of the word, and whoever may be its proper subjects, appeare to the writer indisputable, inasmuch as we have the express command, "Go ye, therefore, and teach" (marginal and proper rendering, Make disciples of) "all nations, baptizing them," <fec. (Matt, xxviii 19.) This command is prefaced by the words, "All power is given unto me in heaven and in earth," ver. 18. We read also in Mark xvi. 15, 16, "Go ye into all the world, and preach the Gospel to every creature. He tliat believeth and is baptized, shall be saved; but he that believeth not shall be damned." In accordance with this law of the kingdom of heaven, on the day of Pentecost, to those who inquired, "Men and brethren, what shall we do]" Peter replied, "Repent, and be baptized, every one of you," &c Subsequent conduct and instruction recorded in the Acts and Epistles of the Apostles, prove that baptism, whatever may be its import or advantages, was regarded as having been legislatively enacted by the adored Sovereign and Head of the church. Hence Acts"ii 41; viii 12, 13, 36, 38; ix. 18; x. 47,48; xvi. 15,33; xviii. 8; xix. 3-5; xxii. 16; Rom. vi 3, 4; 1 Cor. L 13-17; xiL 13; Gal. iii. 27; Eph. iv. 5; Col. ii. 12; 1 Peter iii 21.

Baptism, therefore, is not indebted for its origin to the decrees of popes or ecclesiastical assemblies, to the whims, vagaries, inventions, or policy of uninspired, designing, or erring men. It is commanded by "the wisdom of God." It should not, therefore, be scorned or despised; nor should it be prartically disregarded, unless the intention of God that it should be of temporary continuance, can be proved from His own Word.

• The reader will perceive that some of the subsequent prefixes to the various sections of this volume are from Baptist writers, ami that many of these prefixed quotations ■wrre not intended for baptism by their respective authors, hut that they are here adduced because of their appropriateness and importance.

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