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DESPERATE DISEASES.

Diseases desperate grown, By desperate appliance are reliev'd.

SHAKSPERE, Hamlet, act 4, sc. 3.

DEUS NOBIS HÆC OTIA FECIT.

God hath given us this tranquillity.

The quotation is from VIRGIL, and is the motto of the arms of the town of Liverpool.

DEVIL TAKE THE HINDMOST:
Quicken the squadrons in the flight,
And bid the devil take the slowest.

PRIOR, Ode on taking Namur, v. 11.

The race by vigour, not by vaunts is won,
So take the hindmost, h-, he said, and run.

Pope, Dunciad, book 2, line 60.
Then horn for horn they stretch an' strive,
Deil tak’ the hindmost! on they drive,
Till a' their weel-swall’d kytes belyve.

dre bent like drums,
Burns, Toa Haggis, v. 4.

DIDST THOU, &c.

Didst thou never hear That things ill got had ever bad success ?

SHAKSPERE, King Henry 6th, part 3, act 2, sc. 2.

DIRGE IN CYMBELINE.
COLLINS' Poems.

DISCORD.
Discord oft in music makes the sweeter lay.

SPENSER, Fairy Queen, book 3, canto 2.

DISCUSSION.
And friendly free discussion calling forth
From the fair jewel Truth its latent ray.

Thomson, Liberty, part 2.

DOG MUST NOT EAT DOG.

Hence jarring sectaries may learn
Their real int' rest to discern;
That brother should not war with brother,
And
worry

and devour each other.
COWPER, Nightingale and Glow-worm.

DOGS.

Homer related his misfortunes to Glaucus, who had a tender heart, and was touched by the narration. He guided Homer to his own house, lighted a fire, prepared a repast, and setting it before him, pressed him to eat.

The dogs, instead of eating, continued to bark at Homer, as dogs usually do at strangers. Homer observing it, recited these verses :

“Glaucus, keeper of these flocks, understand thoroughly what I shall say. Give your dogs their food in the porch. This advice is good. They will then hear the steps of men or beasts going towards your enclosures more easily.'

BUCKLEY's Odyssey of Homer, Life, p. 20. Dogs, ye have have had your day ; ye fear'd no more Ulysses, vengeful, from the Trojan shore.

Pope's Homer, Odyssey, book 22, line 41.

DOING GOOD.
Do good by stealth, and blush to find it fame.

Pope, Epil. to Sat. dialogue 1, line 136.
When, if the motive right were understood,
His daily pleasure is in doing good.

Gay, Epi. 4.
Hard was their lodging, homely was their food,
For all their luxury was doing good,

GARTH, Claremont, line 148.
Now, at a certain time, in pleasant mood,
He tried the luxury of doing good.

CRABBE, Tales of the Hall, book 3.
Sincere, and warm, with zeal well-understood,
She takes a noble pride in doing good,

YOUNG, Satire õ, line 353.

DOST THOU NOW, &c.

Dost thou now fall over to my foes? Thou wear a lion's hide ! doff it for shame, And hang a calf's skin on those recreant limbs.

SHAKSPERE, King John, act 3, sc. 1.

G

DOUBLE.

Double, double, toil and trouble,
Fire burn; and caldron bubble.

SHAKSPERE, Macbeth, act 4, sc. 1. Double, double toil and trouble ;-literally, trouble brings trouble to trouble.

BUCKLEY's Sophocles, Ajax, p. 267. War, he sung, is toil and trouble ; Honour but an empty bubble.

DRYDEN, Alexander's Feast.

DOUBT.

Doubt thou the stars are fire ;

Doubt that the sun doth move ;
Doubt truth to be a liar;
But never doubt, I love.

SHAKSPERE, Hamlet, act 2, sc. 2.

DOUBTLESS. Doubtless the pleasure is as great Of being cheated as to cheat.

BUTLER, Hudibras, part 2, canto 3.

DOUGLAS
A Tragedy, by the Rev. John HOME.

DOVER CLIFFS.

Half way down Hangs one that gathers samphire ; dreadful trade !

SHAKSPERE, King Lear, act 4, sc. 6.

DOWN AMONG THE DEAD MEN.
A Tory Song in vogue in 1707, the burthen whereof is;

And he that will his health deny,
Down among

the dead men let him lie,
DR. JOHNSON, Life of Addison.

DOWN, CLIMBING SORROW.

Down thou climbing sorrow, Thy element's below.

SHAKSPERE, King Lear, act 2, sc. 4.

DRAGS ITS SLOW LENGTH ALONG. A needless Alexandrine ends the song, That like a wounded snake drags its slow length along.

POPE. On Criticism, line 356. Snatch up stones, shepherd, snatch up clubs; and while he rears his threatening gorge, and swells his hissing neck, knock him down, and now in fright he has deeply hidden his dastardly head, while his middle knots and the wreath in his tail's extremity are unfolded, and his last tortuous joint now drags its slow spires along.

DAVIDSON's Virgil Backley, The Georgics, book 3, p. 81.

DRESSED IN A LITTLE BRIEF AUTHORITY.

But man, proud man !
Dress'd in a little brief authority;
Most ignorant of what he's most assur'd,
His glassy essence, -like an angry ape
Plays such fantastic tricks before high heaven,
As make the angels weep.

SHAKSPERE, Measure for Measure, act 2, sc. 2.

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