Imagens das páginas
PDF
ePub

amendments, and altered the title so as to read “An act to extend the time for the collection of taxes.” The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the said report, and it was decided in the affirmative. Mr. Colt moved that said bill be ordered to a third reading. The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative. Mr. Cross, from the committee on the incorporation of cities and villages, to which was referred the petition for that purpose, reported a bill entitled, “An act to amend the charter of the village of Waterford,” which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read a second time, and committed to a committee of the whole. Mr. Colt, from the committee on the internal affairs of towns and counties, to which was referred the bill from the Assembly entitled, “An act authorising the supervisors of Dutchess county to remove the poor house of said county,” reported adverse to the passage of said bill. Mr. Snyder moved that said report be laid on the table. The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative. Mr. Carroll, from the committee on engrossed bills, reported as correctly engrossed the following bills: “An act authorising the appraisal and payment of canal damages to Joseph Ogden,” “An act further to amend the charter of the Attica and Hornellsville railroad company, passed May 14, 1845,” “An act to authorise the Exchange Bank of Genesee to change its place of business.” Ordered, That said bills do have their third reading. The President laid before the Senate the annual report of the Institution for the Savings of Merchant's clerks in New-York, which was referred to the committee on banks and insurance companies. The President laid before the Senate a communication, in the words following, to wit:

To the Hon. the MEMBERs of SENATE:

GENTLEMEN-You are respectfully solicited to attend the festival and fair of Clinton Union No. 26, Daughters of Temperance, to be held at Bleecker Hall, on Thursday and Friday, 24th and 25th instant. By order, MARY SCOTT, R. S., Pr., M. L. P.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Cross asked for and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled, “An act to amend an act to establish courts of civil and criminal jurisdiction in the city of Brooklyn,” which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to committee on the judiciary.

Mr. Cross moved that said bill be printed. The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative. On motion of Mr. Cook, The Senate proceeded to the consideration of the resolutions heretofore received from the Assembly, in the words following, to Wit : Resolved, (if the Senate concur,) That this Legislature has seen with profound satisfaction, the patriotic and constitutional recommendation of the President of the United States, that wise and sufficient appropriations be made for the construction of harbors and the improvement of the navigation of rivers. Resolved, (if the Senate concur,) That our senators and representatives in Congress, will reflect and express the wishes of the people of the State of New-York, in advocating such bill as will best facilitate the speedy and complete improvement of the harbors and rivers of our country. Mr. Mann moved to amend the first resolution, by striking out the words “and constitutional.” The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the said motion to strike out, and it was determined in the negative, as follows:

FOR THE AFFIRMATIVE.

Mr. Brandreth Mr. Fox Mr. Snyder

Mr. Brown Mr. Guinnip Mr. Stanton
Mr. Carroll Mr. Mann Mr. Stone

Mr. Curtis Mr. Noyes Mr. Tuttle

Mr. Dart Mr. Skinner 14

FOR THE NEGATIVE.

Mr. Babcock Mr. Cross Mr. Owen

Mr. Beach Mr. Dimmick Mr. Robinson
Mr. Beekman Mr. Geddes Mr. Schoonmaker
Mr. Colt Mr. Johnson Mr. Upham

Mr. Cook Mr. Miller Mr. Williams
Mr. Crolius Mr. Morgan 17

Mr. Stanton moved to amend the first resoluton by striking out all after the words “(if the Senate concur,)” and inserting the following “That the constitution of the United States has vested in Congress the exclusive power to regulate commerce amongst foreign nations and among the several states, and as there cannot be an extensive commercial intercourse with foreign nations without safe and convenient harbors on the sea coast, nor between the several states without sundry improvements in river and lake harbors, therefore it

ISENATE Journal.] 15

is the duty of Congress to make wise and liberal appropriations for the improvement of such harbors and rivers.” Debate was had thereon, when Mr. Carroll moved that the Senate do now adjourn. The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the said motion, and it was decided in the negative, as sollows:

FOR THE AFFIRMATIVE.

Mr. Brandreth Mr. Fox Mr. Snyder

Mr. Brown Mr. Guinnip Mr. Stanton

Mr. Carroll Mr. Mann Mr. Stone

Mr. Curtis Mr. Noyes Mr. Tuttle

Mr. Dart Mr. Skinner 14 FOR THE NEGATIVE.

Mr. Babcock Mr. Cross Mr. Owen

Mr. Beach Mr. Dimmick Mr. Robinson

Mr. Beekman Mr. Geddes Mr. Schoonmaker

Mr. Colt Mr. Johnson Mr. Upham

Mr. Cook Mr. Miller Mr. Williams

Mr. Crolius Mr. Morgan 17

The question recurring on the motion of Mr. Stanton to amend the first resolution,

A division of the question being called,

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to strike out, and it was decided in the negative, as follows:

FOR THE AFFIRMATIVE

Mr. Brandreth Mr. Fox Mr. Snyder
Mr. Brown Mr. Guinnip Mr. Stanton
Mr. Carroll Mr. Mann Mr. Stone

Mr. Curtis Mr. Noyes Mr. Tuttle

Mr. I)art Mr. Skinner 14

FOR THE NEGATIVE.

Mr. Babcock Mr. Cross Mr. Owen

Mr. Beach Mr. Dimmick Mr. Robinson
Mr. Beekman Mr. Geddes Mr. Schoonmaker
Mr. Colt Mr. Johnson Mr. Upham

Mr. Cook Mr. Miller Mr. Williams
Mr. Crolius Mr. Morgan 17

Mr. Stanton, moved to amend said resolution by adding at the end thereof the following:

“Provided, such appropriations, as the President recommends, whether for works begun. or to be begun, are such as the wants of the country, and especially the advance of our population over new districts, and the extension of commerce, may render necessary; and provided such appropriations can be made with a due regard to other necessary appropriations which may be made out of the treasury during the present session of Congress.” The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the said moion, and it was decided in the negative, as follows:

FOR THE AFFIRMATIVE.

Mr. Brandreth Mr. Fox Mr. Snyder

Mr. Brown Mr. Guinnip Mr. Stanton

Mr. Carroll Mr. Mann Mr. Stone

Mr. Curtis Mr. Noyes Mr. Tuttle

Mr. Dart Mr. Skinner 14 FOR THE NEGATIVE.

Mr. Babcock Mr. Cross Mr. Owen

Mr. Beach Mr. Dimmick Mr. Robinson

Mr. Beekman Mr. Geddes Mr. Schoonmaker

Mr. Colt Mr. Johnson Mr. Upham

Mr. Cook Mr. Miller Mr. Williams

Mr. Crolius Mr. Morgan 17

Mr. Mann moved to amend the first resolution by striking out all after the words “if the Senate concur,” and insert the following: Resolved, (if the Assembly concur,) That the recent message of the President of the United States in relation to California, in which he recommends to Congress not to establish a territorial government over “the territory commonly designated by the name of New Mexico,” and advises that body to wait “the silent effect of causes, independent of the action of Congress,” to settle “the subject which now excites such painful sensations in the country,” (meaning the extension of slavery,) is a just and merited rebuke to those of his supporters in this state, who have for mere political purposes, professed on this subject opinions in opposition to those of the administration at Washington, and affords conclusive evidence that the friends of the present administration of the National Government intend to wait “the silent effect of causes, independent of the action of Congress,” to settle the question of freedom or slavery in the territories, and that they are not in favor of enacting the Jeffersonian ordinance of freedom for that purpose, notwithstanding their oft-repeated professions to the contrary. Resolved, (if the Assembly concur,) That “the claim advanced by the State of Texas to a very o: portion of the most populous district of the territory commonly designated by the name of New Mexico,” is not in the opinion of this Legislature any good reason why Congress should delay the establishment of a territorial government over said territory, for the protection and security of the lives and property of its inhabitants. Resolved, (if the Assembly concur,) That the policy recommend

ed by the President, of non-interference by Congress on the subject which now in his opinion excites such painful sensations in the country, is contrary to the policy which the friends of the President in this State have heretofore professed to advocate, and that notwithstanding such recommendation by the President, we are in favor of positive and speedy action by Congress on the subject, and are decidedly opposed to waiting “the silent effect of causes, independent of the action of Congress,” to settle a subject which “excites such painful sensations in the country.” Mr. Upham rose to a point of order, and submitted that a motion to strike out and insert was not now in order, in as much as the Senate had once decided not to strike out. The President decided the point of order to be well taken. Mr. Mann then moved to amend the first resolution, by adding at the end thereof the following: Resolved, (if the Assembly concur,) That the recent message of the President of the United States in relation to California, in which he recommends to Congress not to establish a territorial government over “the territory commonly designated by the name of New Mexico,” and advises that body to wait “the silent effect of causes, independent of the action of Congress,” to settle “the subject which now excites such painful sensations in the country,” (meaning the extension of slavery,) is a just and merited rebuke to those of his supporters in this State, who have for mere political purposes, professed on this subject opinions in opposition to those of the administration at Washington, and affords conclusive evidence that the friends of the pre-ent administration of the National Government intend to await “the silent effect of causes, independent of the ac. tion of Congress,” to settle the question of freedom or slavery in the territories, and that they are not in favor of enacting the Jeffersonian ordinance of freedom for that purpose, notwithstanding their oft repeated professions to the contrary. Resolved, (if the Assembly concur,) That “the claim advanced by the State of Texas to a very large portion of the most populous district of the territory commonly designated by the name of New Mexico,” is not, in the opinion of this Legislature, any good reason why Congress should delay the establishment of a territorial government over said territory, for the protection and security of the lives and property of its inhabitants. Resolved, (if the Assembly concur,) That the policy recommended by the President, of non-interference by Congress on the subject which now in his opinion excites such painful sensations in the country, is contrary to the policy which the friends of the President in this State, have heretofore professed to advocate, and that notwithstanding such recommendation by the President, we are in favor of positive and speedy action by Congress on the subject, and are decidedly opposed to waiting “the silent effect of causes independent of the action of Congress,” to settle a subject which “excites such painful sensations in the country.” The President decided that the said matter, so proposed to be ad

« AnteriorContinuar »