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New York loves the Union of the States. She will not contemplate the possibility of its dissolution; and sees no reason to calculate the enormity of such a calamity.

She also loves the cause of Human Freedom; and sees no reason to abstain from an avowal of her attachment. While, therefore, she holds fast to the one, she will not forsake the other.

The foreclosure of a mortgage, given to the Commissioners for loaning certain moneys of the United States, has vested in the State the title to a small piece of land, and to the stone building, near Newburgh, in the county of Orange, known as “Washington's HeadQuarters.” I. respectfully submit that there are associations connected with this venerable edifice which rise above the consideration of dollars and cents, and which should distinguish it from other acquisitions and property of the State, and should prevent its being disposed of, unless for objects in some degree congenial with its past history. It is perhaps the last relic within the bounds of the State, and under the control of its Legislature, connected with the history of the illustrious man who left us this patriotic admonition:—

“It is of infinite moment that you should properly estimate the immense value of your national union to your collective and individual happiness; that you should cherish a cordial, habitual, and immovable attachment to it; o yourselves to think and to speak of it!as a palladium of yo. olitical safety and prosperity; watching for its preservation with jealous anxiety; discountenancing whatever may suggest even a suspicion that it can in any event be abandoned; and indignantly frowning upon the first dawning of every attempt to alienate any portion of our country from the rest, or to enfeeble the sacred ties which now link together the various parts.

“In contemplating the causes which may disturb our Union, it occurs as matter of serious concern that any ground should have been furnished for characterizing parties by geographical discriminnations— northern and southern, Atlantic and western :’ whence designing men may endeavor to excite a belief that there is a real difference of local interests and views. One of the expedients of party to acquire influence within particular districts is, to misrepresent the opinions and aims of other districts. . You cannot shield yourselves too much against the jealousies and heart-burnings which spring from these misrepresentations. They tend to render alien to each other those who ought to be bound together by fraternal affection.”

If our deliberations and actions are #. by the spirit breathed forth in this admonition, we may confidently hope for the continuance to us, as a Nation, of those blessings which the wise and bountiful Ruler of the Universe has hitherto abundantly granted.

- HAMILTON FISH. ExEcutive CHAMBER, .Albany, January 1, 1850.

On motion of Mr. Williams,
Ordered, That the said message be laid on the table and printed.

The President laid before the Senate a communication from the commissioners on practice and pleadings, in the following words, to wit:

.Albany, Dec. 31, 1849.

SIR-The commissioners on practice and pleadings beg leave to present, through you, to the Senate, their report complete of a code of civil procedure, of a code of criminal procedure, and of two special acts in connection there with. With great respect your obedient servants, ARPHAXED LOOMIS, DAVID GRAHAM,

DAVID DUDLEY FIELD. To the President of the Senate.

On motion of Mr. Babcock, Ordered, That said communication be laid on the table. The President laid before the Senate a communication from Dayid Graham, one of the commissioners on practice and pleadings, in the words following, to wit:

Albany, Dec. 31, 1849. To the President of the Senate:

SIR-The undersigned, one of the commissioners on practice and pleadings, begs leave to present herewith to the Senate, his dissent from certain portions of the code of civil procedure, as reported complete by the commissioners. Very respectfully yours, DAVID GRAHAM. On motion of Mr. Babcock, Ordered, That the said communication be laid upon the table. On motion of Mr. Crolius, The Senate then adjourned until eleven o'clock to-morrow morning.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 8, 1850.

s The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Waggoner.

The Journal of yesterday was read and approved.

Mr. Cook presented the petition of Roscius R. Kennedy, for the incorporation of the Jonesville Academy, which was referred to the committee on literature.

Mr. Cross presented the petition of the trustees of the Brooklyn benevolent society, for an amendment of their act of incorporation, which was referred to the committee on charitable and religious societies. Mr. Schoonmaker presented the petition of the supervisors of the county of Ulster, for the release of the county from the anti-rent expenses, which was referred to the committee on the internal affairs of towns and counties. Mr. Schoonmaker presented the petition of the board of supervisors of Ulster county, for the election of a local officer in said county to discharge the duties of county judge and surrogate in certain cases, which was referred to the committee on the judiciary. Mr. Colt presented the petition of sundry inhabitants of Livingston county, praying for an appropriation for an agricultural college and experimental farm, which was referred to the committee on agriculture. Mr. Mann presented the memorial of A. B. Johnson, in relation to the circulation of the bills of expired safety fund banks, which was referred to the committee on banks and insurance companies. The President laid before the Senate a communication from the Mayor of the city of Buffalo, in answer to a resolution of the Senate, passed April 2, 1849, calling for a statement of the liabilities and indebtedness of the cities and villages of this state, which was referred to the committee on the incorporation of cities and villages. Mr. Cook gave notice that, at an early day, he would ask leave to introduce a bill entitled, “An act to revise and consolidate the laws in relation to the village of Whitehall.” Mr. Carroll gave notice that, at an early day, he would ask leave to introduce a bill requiring the common council of the city of Troy to issue scrip in shares of not less than twenty dollars to the tax payers of said city, for the amount of the principal and interest heretofore paid by them severally and hereafter to be paid on the principal on account of the construction, together with its appurtenances, of the Troy and Schenectady railroad. Mr. Cook offered for the consideration of the Senate, a resolution in the words following, to wit: Resolved, That so much of the Governor's message as relates to cholera and its treatment, be referred to the standing committee on medical societies and colleges; That so much thereof as relates to the powers and duties of municipal and local authorities under the “act to preserve the public health,” be referred to the standing committee on the judiciary; That so much thereof as relates to the finances of the State, be referred to the standing committee on finance; That so much thereof as relates to canals, be referred to the standing committee on canals; That so much thereof as relates to the Albany basin, be referred to the standing committee on finance; That so much thereof as relates to public education, be referred to the standing committee on literature;

That so much thereof as relates to an agricultural college and experimental farm, be referred to the standing committee on agriculture; That so much thereof as relates to currency, be referred to the standing committee on banks and insurance companies; That so much thereof as relates to the county superintendents of common schools, be referred to the standing committee on literature : That so much thereof as relates to the assessment and collection of taxes, be referred to the standing committee on internal affairs of towns and counties; That so much thereof as relates to the compensation of the health officer of the city of New-York, be referred to the standing committee on retrenchment; That so much thereof as relates to the severity of criminal punishment, be referred to the standing committee on the judiciary; That so much thereof as relates to prisons and the western house of refuge, be referred to the standing committee on state prisons; That so much thereof as relates to the lunatic asylum and an asylum and schools for idiots, be referred to the standing committee on poor laws; That so much thereof as relates to the deaf, dumb and blind, be referred to the standing committee on charitable and religious societies; That so much thereof as relates to alien passengers, be referred to the standing committee on commerce and navigation; That so much thereof as relates to the State Library and Cabinet of Natural History, be referred to the select joint committee on the Library; That so much thereof as relates to the appointment of commissioners of the code, be referred to the standing committee on the judiciary; That so much thereof as relates to the trial of criminals, be referred to the standing committee on the judiciary; That so much thereof as relates to vagrancy, be referred to the standing committee on poor laws; That so much thereof as relates to the homestead exemption, be referred to the standing committee on the judiciary; That so much thereof as relates to the militia, be referred to the standing committee on the militia; That so much thereof as relates to railroads, be referred to the standing committee on railroads; That so much thereof as relates to the extension of slavery over territies now free, be referred to a select committee ; That so much thereof as relates to Washington's Head-Quarters, be referred to a select committee; Which were severally read and adopted by the Senate. On motion of Mr. Geddes, and by unanimous consent, Resolved, (if the Assembly concur,) That the twelve hundred copies of the report of the Commissioners on Practice and Plead(Faipur, January 4.] 31 .* * * *ings, containing the codes of civil and criminal procedure complete, be disposed of as follows: five copies to the Governor, five copies to the Lieutenant Governor, five copies to each member of the Legislature, one hundred copies to each of the Commissioners, the remainder to be placed under the charge of the Governor and Secretary of State for distribution. On motion of Mr. Carroll, The Senate then adjourned until 11 o’clock to-morrow morning.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 4, 1850.

The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

Prayer by the Rev. Dr. Wyckoff.

Mr. Brandreth, Senator elect from the seventh district, appeared at the desk of the President, who administered to him the oath of office, and he took his seat as a member of the Senate.

The journal of yesterday was read and approved.

In pursuance of the twenty-seventh standing rule of the Senate, the President announced the following standing and select committees of the Senate:

On Claims.
Mr. Schoonmaker, Mr. Johnson.
Mr. Crook,

On Finance.
Mr. Morgan, ... Mr. Brown.
Mr. Colt, ** *

On Charitable and Religious Societies.

Mr. Stanton, - Mr. Fox.
Mr. Robinson,

on the Judiciary.

Mr. Babcock, Mr. Mann.
Mr. Schoonmaker,

On the JMilitia.

Mr. Guinnip, Mr. Tuttle.
Mr. Crolius,

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