Imagens das páginas
PDF
ePub

MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 1850.

The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

Prayer by the Rev. Dr. Beecher. The journal of Saturday was read and approved. Mr. Dart presented three several petitions of sundry inhabitants of St. Lawrence county, and also of the supervisors of said county, for a law authorising the commissioners of the Ogdensburgh and Canton road to borrow money and convert their road into a plank road, which was referred to the committee on roads and bridges. Mr. Brown presented the petition of the trustees of the village of Astoria, praying for a law authorising them to raise money by tax for the education of the poor of said village, which was referred to the committee on literature. Mr. Beekman presented the petition of Cecelia De Nottbeck, praying for a law to legalize the descent of certain property to her heirs, which was referred to the committee on the judiciary. Mr. Beekman presented the memorial of the New-York Historical Society, asking for an appropriation from the state for the benefit of said society, which was laid upon the table. On motion of Mr. Morgan, Ordered, That the said memorial be printed. Mr. Tuttle presented the petition of the president and directors of the Schoharie and Duanesburgh turnpike company, praying for an act authorising them to sell their road to a company for planking, which was referred to the committee on roads and bridges. The President laid before the Senate the memorial of the American Association for the advancement of science, in relation to geological surveys, and the publication of reports of the same, which was referred to the committee on literature. The President laid before the Senate the report of the Butchers' and Drovers' Bank, in relation to unclaimed dividends and deposits, which was referred to the committee on banks and insurance comanies. P The President laid before the Senate a communication from James H. Armsby, Professor of Anatomy, of the Albany Medical College, in the words following to wit: The members and officers of the Senate are invited to visit the museum of the Albany Medical College, which will be open every day in the week, except Sundays, during the session. By order of the Faculty, JAMES H. ARMSBY, Professor of Anatomy. The President laid before the Senate a communication from the Inspectors of State Prisons, transmitting their annual report, which was read in the words following, to wit:

Hon. G. W. PATTERson, Lt. Governor and Pres’t of the Senate. SIR,-Pursuant to the direction of the 7th subdivision of the 34th section of the “act for the better regulation of the county and state prisons of this state, and consolidating and amending the existing laws in relation thereto.” passed December 14, 1847, requiring the Inspectors of State Prisons “to make an annual report to the Legislature, on or before the fifteenth day of January in each year, of the state and condition of each of said prisons, the convicts confined therein, the money expended and received, and generally of all the proceedings during the past year,” the second annual report of the Inspectors is herewith transmitted for presentation to the honorable the Senate. Very respectfully, ISAAC N. COMSTOCK, DAVID D. SPENCER, ALEX. H. WELLS, January 1, 1850. Inspectors of State Prisons.

Ordered, That the said report be laid upon the table. By unanimous consent, Mr. Dart introduced a bill entitled “An act to authorise the commissioners of the Ogdensburgh and Canton road to convert their road into a plank road, and to borrow money for that purpose,” which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on roads and bridges. Mr. Geddes gave notice that at an early day, he would ask leave to introduce a bill in relation to personal property exempt from execution. Mr. Johnson gave notice that he would, at an early day, ask leave to introduce a bill to amend an act entitled, “An act providing for the registry of births, marriages and deaths,” passed April 28, 1847. In pursuance of previous notice, Mr. Schoonmaker asked for and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled, “An act to amend sections 19 and 25 of article 2, of chapter 13, of title 2, part 1, of the Revised Statutes,” which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on the internal affairs of towns and counties. Mr. Colt offered for the consideration of the Senate, a resolution in the words following, to wit: Resolved, That the committee on the internal affairs of towns and counties be discharged from the further consideration of so much of the Governor's message as relates to local or municipal taxation, and that the same be referred to the committee on cities and villaes. The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative. By unanimous consent, Mr. Babcock gave notice that he would, at an early day, ask leave to introduce a bill to provide for the trial of causes in the supreme court, in which the justices of the district, where the same are to be tried, have been engaged as counsel. On motion of Mr. Crolius, The Senate then proceeded to the consideration of the resolution heretofore offered by him, in the words following, to wit: Resolved, That the Clerk of the Senate furnish to each of the members, officers and reporters of the Senate, a penknife, of the usual quality, and that the expense thereof be paid out of the contingent fund of the Senate. The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative. Mr. Johnson offered for the consideration of the Senate, a resolution in the words following, to wit: Resolved, That 1,000 extra copies of the report of the state prison inspectors be printed for the use of the said inspectors. Ordered, That said resolution be referred to the committee on public printing. . On motion of Mr. Colt, The Senate then adjourned until 11 o'clock to-morrow morning.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 8, 1850.

The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

T Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Howard. The journal of yesterday was read and approved. Mr. Geddes presented the petition of A. J. Coffin for an amendment of the new school law that will revive the free school law of the village of Poughkeepsie, which was referred to the committee on literature. Mr. Stone presented two petitions of ladies and gentlemen of Madison county for a law providing for the education of neglected and destitute children of the State, which was referred to the committee on charitable and religious societies. Mr. Dimmick presented the petition of Joseph Ogden for relief from damages done to his farm by the overflow bf the waters of the Chenango canal, which was referred to the committee on grievances. Mr. Snyder presented the petition of citizens of Hudson for the incorporation of a bank for savings at Hudson, which was referred to the committee on banks and insurance companies. Mr. Snyder also presented the petition of the Hudson and Berkshire railroad company for a law to suspend the payment of the interest and sinking fund due the State, which was referred to the The President laid before the Senate the resolutions of the agricultural society of Orleans county for the establishment of an agricultural college and experimental farm, which was referred to the committee on agriculture. Mr. Beach, from the committee on public printing, to which was referred the resolution to print 1,000 copies of the report of the inspectors of state prisons, reported in favor of printing five times the usual number of said report for the use of the Legislature, and 1,000 for the inspectors. The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the said report, and it was decided in the affirmative. Mr. Miller, from the committee on roads and bridges, to which was referred the bill entitled, “An act to authorise the commissioners of the Ogdensburgh and Canton road company to convert their road into a plank road and to borrow money for that purpose,” reported in favor of the passage of the same with amendments, which was committed to the committee of the whole. Mr. Cook, from the select committee, to which was referred the rules and orders of the last Senate for revision and amendment, reported the said rules with the following amendments, to wit: In rule four, strike out all after the word “day,” in the fourth line. The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the said amendment, and it was decided in the affirmative. In rule twenty-eight, make the 27th standing committee, “manufacture of salt;” the 28th standing committee, “internal affairs of towns and counties;” the 29th standing committee, “on public printing.” The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the second amendment, and it was decided in the affirmative. In rule thirty-five, strike out all after the word “except,” in the first line, and insert “ Gentlemen with ladies, the Governor and Lt. Governor, former Governors and Lt. Governors, former Chancellors, Justices of the Court of Appeals, Justices of the Supreme Court, former Judges of Supreme Court, Members of Congress, former Members of Congress, Members of the Legislature, former Members of the Legislature, State Officers, Governor's Private and Military Secretary, the Adjutant General, Officers of the Senate, Officers of the Assembly, reporters of the Senate, persons introduced by Senators.” The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the third amendment, and it was decided in the affirmative. * In rule thirty-six, strike out the word “members,” in the first line, and insert “President, Members and Clerk;” after the word “the,” in the third line, and insert the words “persons above mentioned ’’ The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the fourth amendment, and it was decided in the affirmative. Mr. Miller moved further to amend the thirty-sixth rule, by insering the words “each of " before the words “the persons above mentioned.” The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the said amendment of Mr. Miller, and it was decided in the af. firmative. In rule forty-four, after the word “members,” in the second line, insert the word “present.” The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the amendment to forty-fourth rule, and it was determined in the affirmative. Add as rule forty-six the following: “The President shall assign to the doorkeepers their respective duties and stations.” The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the forty-six rule, and it was decided in the affirmative. The President then put the question whether the Senate would agree to the report of the committee, as amended, and it was decided in the affirmative. The rules and orders adopted were as follows: 1. The President having taken the chair at the hour to which the Senate shall have adjourned, and a quorum being present, the journal of the preceding day shall be read, to the end that any mistake therein may be corrected. 2. After the reading and approving of the journal, the order of business shall be as follows: The presentation of petitions. Reports of standing committees. . Reports of select committees. . Messages from the Governor. . Messages from the Assembly. . Communications and reports from State officers. . Notices and the introduction of bills. . Motions and resolutions. . Third reading of bills. . Special orders. . General orders, but messages from the Governor and Assembly, and communications and reports from State officers, may be considered at any time. 3. The clerk shall make a list of all bills and of resolutions proposing amendments to the Constitution, and of all other matters which shall be committed to a committee of the whole, in which they shall be arranged in the order in which they were introduced ; which list shall be called the General Orders of the Day. And all such matters shall be taken up and acted upon in the several orders of business in which they may be, in order in which they stand upon the General Orders, unless the Senate shall otherwise order. 4. Whenever any bill or other matter is made the special order for a particular day, and it shall not be completed on that day, it shall retain its place in the general orders of the day, unless it shall be made the special order for another day.

committee on finance. *

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

[SENATE Journal.] 6

« AnteriorContinuar »