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Mr. Cross moved that said petition be referred to the committee on claims. The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative. Mr. Carroll, from the committee on engrossed bills, reported as correctly engrossed the bill entitled, “An act to extend the time for county superintendents of the poor elected in November, 1849, to take the oath of office and file their official bond.” Ordered, That the said bill do have its third reading. Mr. Babcock, from the committee on the judiciary, to which was referred the bill entitled, “An act to change the times and places of holding the general terms of the supreme court in the seventh judicial district,” reported in favor of the passage of the same with amendments, which was committed to a committee of the whole. Mr. Babcock, from the committee on the judiciary, to which was referred the petition of Marquis Long, praying for a law authorising the Commissioners of the Land Office to convey to him a certain island in the Chittenango creek now belonging to the state, reported, and asked to be discharged from the further consideration of said petition. Ordered, That the said report be laid upon the table. Mr. Schoonmaker, from the committee on claims, to which was referred the petition of Orin Austin and others, for a reappraisal of certain state lands obtained from the Stockbridge Indians, reported in writing adverse to the prayer of the petitioners, and offered the following resolution, to wit: Resolved, That the prayer of the petitioners ought not to be granted. Mr. Stone moved that said report be laid upon the table. The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative. Mr. Beach, from the committee on public printing, reported in favor of printing five times the usual number of the report of the Regents of the University for the use of the Legislature, and one thousand copies for the use of said Regents. The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative. A message was received from the Assembly, informing that they had concurred in the resolution of the Senate in relation to the appointment of a night watch for the capitol. A message was received from the Assembly requesting the Senate to transmit to that body the petitions and papers on their files in relation to the repeal of the laws authorising double dockage in the city of Albany, which was laid on the table. The President laid before the Senate a statement of the Poughkeepsie Savings Bank in relation to the condition of said bank, which was referred to the committee on banks and insurance companies. Mr. Morgan gave notice that, at an early day, he would ask leave to introduce a bill to allow contracts of loan and forbearance on personal security for short periods. Mr. Williams gave notice that he would, on some futnre day, ask leave to introduce a bill to amend the law respecting harbor masters for the port of New-York. ** Mr. Beekman gave notice that he would, at an early day, ask leave to introduce a bill to amend “An act for the more effectual prevention of fires in the city of New-York,” passed March 7, 1849. In pursuance of previous notice, Mr. Schoonmaker asked for and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled, “An act to obviate difficulties in certain powers of sale,” which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on the judiciary. On motion of Mr. Cook, The Senate proceeded to the consideration of a resolution heretofore offered by him, in the words following: Resolved, That in the judgment of the Senate the objects to be obtained by savings banks or corporations, cannot be secured to the community by a general law for that purpose. Mr. Schoonmaker moved to amend the said resolution, by striking out all after the word “resolved,” and insert the following: “That it be referred to the Attorney General to report whether, in his opinion, under the 4th section of the 8th article of the Constitution the Legislature have power to create a savings bank by a special act of incorporation.” The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the said amendment, and it was decided in the affirmative. The question recurring on the resolution as amended, Mr. Babcock moved further to amend the said resolution, by insorting after the word “bank,” the words “ or institution.” The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said amendment of Mr. Babcock, and it was decided in the affirmtive. The President then put the question whether the Senate would agree to the said resolution as amended, and it was decided in the affirmative. Mr. Williams offered for the consideration of the Senate, a resolution in the words following, to wit: Resolved, That the committee on commerce and navigation be discharged from the further consideration of the petitions relating to double wharfage in the city of Albany. Mr. Johnson moved to lay said resolution on the table. The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative. On motion of Mr. Geddes, Resolved, That the New-York institution of civil engineers be permitted to use this chamber this evening for their annual meet

in The bill entitled, “An act to extend the time for county superintendents of the poor, elected in November, 1849, to take their oath of office and file their official bond,” was read the third time and passed, a majority of all the members elected to the Senate voting in favor thereof, as follows:

FOR THE AFFIRMATIVE.

Mr. Beekman Mr. Dart Mr. Robinson
Mr. Brandreth Mr. Dimmick Mr. Schoonmaker
Mr. Brown Mr. Fox Mr. Skinner
Mr. Carroll Mr. Guinnip Mr. Snyder

Mr Colt Mr. Johnson Mr. Stanton

Mr. Cook Mr. Miller Mr. Tuttle

Mr. Crolius Mr. Morgan Mr. Upham
Mr. Crook Mr. Noyes Mr. Williams
Mr. Cross Mr. Owen 26

Fort THE NEGATIVE. Mr. Curtis Mr. Mann Mr. Stone 3

Ordered, That the Clerk deliver said bill to the Assembly, and request their concurrence therein. The Senate then resolved itself into a committee of the whole on the bill entitled, “An act to authorise the election of a special county judge in the county of Ulster,” and after some time spent thereon, Mr. Beekman, from said committee, reported in favor of the passage of the same without amendment, which report was agreed to, and said bill ordered engrossed for a third reading. The hour of 12 o'clock having arrived, the Senate proceeded to the consideration of the special order, it being the resolutions in relation to slavery in the District of Columbia and territories now free, reported by a majority of the select committee of which Mr. Geddes is chairman, in the words following: Resolved, (if the Assembly concur.) That as the Federal Constitution was formed and adopted expressly to secure the blessings of liberty to the people of the United States, and their posterity, our Senators in Congress are hereby instructed and our Representatives are requested to use their best efforts to procure the passage of laws that will effectually and forever put an end to the slave trade in the District of Columbia. Resolved, (if the Assembly concur,) That the determination indicated by the governors’ messages, and the resolutions of the legislatures of various of the slave holding states, and by the Representatives of such states in Congress, to extend domestic slavery over the territory acquired by the late treaty of peace with the Republic of Mexico, we feel bound to oppose, by all constitutional means, and our Senators in Congress are hereby instructed and our Representatives are requested to use their best efforts to prohibit by positive enactment, the extension of slavery over any part of such territory, however small, and by whatever pretence of compromise. Resolved, (if the Assembly concur,Y, That our Senators in Conress be instructed, and our Representatives requested, to resist firmy, and to the utmost of their ability, and by such positive legislation as may be necessary, the extension of human slavery, or the jurisdiction of Texas over any part of New-Mexico. Resolved, (if the Assembly concur,) That we have learned with great satisfaction, that the people of California have adopted a constition which is entirely in accordance with the spirit of the free institutions of our country, and our Senators in Congress are hereby instructed, and our Representatives requested to aid in the passage of such laws as may be necessary to admit that state into the Union. Resolved, (if the Assembly concur,) That the people of this State are desirous of preserving inviolate the Federal Union, and that they will strenuously oppose all attempts, from whatever source they may emanate, or under whatever pretence they may be made, to effect its dissolution. Resolved, (if the Assembly concur.) That the Governor be requested to transmit a copy of the foregoing resolutions to each of the Senators and Representatives from this State in Congress. Mr. Guinnip moved that the further consideration of said resolutions be postponed until the 22d day of February next. The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the said motion, and it was decided in the negative, as follows:

FOR THE AFFIRMATIVE.

Mr. Brandreth Mr. Guinnip Mr. Skinner

Mr. Brown Mr. Noyes 5 FOR THE NEGATIVE.

Mr. Beach Mr. Dart Mr. Robinson

Mr. Beekman Mr. Dimmick Mr. Schoonmaker

Mr. Carroll Mr. Fox Mr. Snyder

Mr. Colt Mr. Geddes Mr. Stanton

Mr. Cook Mr. Johnson Mr. Stone

Mr. Crolius Mr. Mann Mr. Tuttle

Mr. Crook Mr. Miller Mr. Upham

Mr. Cross Mr. Morgan Mr. Williams

Mr. Curtis Mr. Owen 26

Mr. Skinner moved to amend the said resolutions by striking out all after the word “Resolved,” and insert the following:

That the people of the State of New-York are strongly attached to the Federal Union, and consider its preservation a matter of the highest interest to themselves, the whole country, and the cause of civil liberty; that, while to sustain it on their own part, they will faithfully abide by all the provisions, compacts, and compromises of the constitution, they will also firmly oppose all attempts from whatever source they may come, and under whatever pretence they may be made, to dissolve the Union.

Resolved,(if the Assembly concur,) That the people of the State of New-York are opposed to the extension of slavery into any territory of the United States, where it does not now exist, and that our Senators in Congress are hereby instructed, and our Representatives requested, to use their best efforts to prevent, by all constitutional means, such extension.

Resolved, (if the Assembly concur,) That the people of the State of New-York have learned with great satisfaction, that the people of California have adopted a constitution which is in accordance with the free institutions of our country, and our Senators in Congress are hereby instructed, and our Representatives requested, to vote for the admission of California into the Union as a State.

A division of the question being called,

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the said motion to strike out, and it was determined in the negative, as follows:

FOR THE AFFIRMATIVE.

Mr. Brandreth Mr. Fox Mr. Snyder

Mr. Brown Mr. Guinnip Mr. Stanton

Mr. Carroll Mr. Mann Mr. Stone

Mr. Curtis Mr. Noyes Mr. Tuttle

Mr. Dart Mr. Skinner 14
For THE NEGATIVE.

Mr. Babcock Mr. Cross Mr. Owen

Mr. Beach Mr. Dimmick Mr. Robinson

Mr. Beekman Mr. Geddes Mr. Schoonmaker

Mr. Colt Mr. Johnson Mr. Upham

Mr. Cook Mr. Miller Mr. Williams

Mr. Crolius Mr. Morgan 17

The question recurring on the adoption of the first resolution,

Mr. Stone moved to amend the first resolution by inserting after the word “posterity,” the words, “therefore the Federal Government ought to relieve itself from all responsibility for the existence or continuance of slavery or the slave trade, wherever it has the constitutional power over those subjects, and.”

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative, as follows:

FOR THE AFFIRMATIVE.

Mr. Beach Mr. Dart Mr. Owen

Mr. Brandreth Mr. Dimmick Mr. Robinson

Mr. Carroll Mr. Fox Mr. Skinner

Mr. Colt Mr. Geddes Mr. Snyder

Mr. Cook Mr. Guinnip Mr. Stanton

Mr. Crolius Mr. Mann Mr. Stone

Mr. Crook Mr. Miller Mr. Tuttle

Mr. Curtis Mr. Noyes Mr. Upham 24
[SENATE Journal.] 11

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