Geological Magazine, Volume 2;Volume 5;Volume 15

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Henry Woodward
Cambridge University Press, 1878

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Página 494 - So careful of the type?' but no. From scarped cliff and quarried stone She cries, 'A thousand types are gone; I care for nothing, all shall go. 'Thou makest thine appeal to me: I bring to life, I bring to death; The spirit does but mean the breath: I know no more.
Página 157 - Why may not the sun have been composed of two such bodies ? And why may not the original store of heat possessed by him have all been derived from the concussion of these two bodies ? Two such bodies coming into collision with that velocity would be dissipated into vapour and converted into a nebulous mass by such an inconceivable amount of heat as would thus be generated ; and when condensation on cooling took place, a spherical mass like that of the sun would result.
Página 201 - ... the time between the death and decay of the soft parts of the sea-urchin and the growth of the coralline to the full size which it has attained. If the decay of the soft parts of the sea-urchin, the attachment, growth to maturity, and decay of the Crania, and the subsequent attachment and growth of the coralline took a year ( which is a low estimate enough ) , the accumulation of the inch of chalk must have taken more than a year; and the deposit of a thousand feet of chalk must consequently...
Página 387 - A continent ten times the size of Europe elevated two miles would do little more than bring London to the latitude of Edinburgh, or Edinburgh to the latitude of London. He must be a sanguine geologist indeed who can expect to account for the glaciation of this country, or for the former absence of ice around the poles by this means. We know perfectly well that since the glacial epoch there have been no changes in the physical geography of the earth sufficient to deflect the pole half a dozen of miles,...
Página 418 - ... which it occurs on the magnificent slab now in the British Museum. As yet, I believe, the jaws have not had the matrix removed from them ; but should they prove to be armed with teeth, it will to me be a cause of satisfaction rather than surprise, as confirming an opinion which some fifteen years ago* I ventured to express, that this remarkable creature may have been endowed with teeth, either in lieu of or combined with a beak.
Página 409 - Certainly, if -we are still to regard the white chalk as a deep-sea deposit, the cretaceous rocks of the north-east of Ireland must have at one time extended farther south than they do at present, and somewhere or other there must have been shore deposits of that period formed further south than the Upper Greensand of Antrim. The careful investigations of Professor Judd have largely extended our knowledge of the Secondary rocks of the western coast and islands of Scotland, and he has been able to...
Página 388 - ... change in the axis of rotation. This conclusion has been further borne out by another mathematician, the Rev. E. Hill, in an article in the June number of the Geological Magazine. And Professor Haughton, in a paper read before the Royal Society, April 4th, and published in Nature, July 4th, entitled "A Geological Proof that the changes of climate in past times were not due to changes in the position of the Pole," has proved from geological evidence that the pole has never shifted its position...
Página 393 - When the eccentricity of the earth-s orbit is at a high value and the northern winter solstice is in perihelion, agencies are brought into operation which make the southeast trade winds stronger than the northeast and compel them to blow over upon the northern hemisphere as far probably as the Tropic of Cancer. The result is that all the great equatorial waters of the ocean are impelled into the northern hemisphere, which thus, in consequence of the immense accumulation of warm water, has its temperature...
Página 45 - Caernarvon, he thought it would prove to be, at least at this part, of Dimetian age. The altered beds near Bangor and their associated quartz felsites he considered entirely of Pebidian age, as there is no evidence that the Dimetiau rocks are exposed there. 4. "On the Precambrian Rocks of Bangor." By Prof. T. McKenny Hughes, MA, FGS The author described a series of slates, agglomerates, and porphyritic rocks which, near Bangor, are seen to pass under the Cambrian and seem to rest conformably upon...
Página 292 - ... this stage of the refrigeration the central portion of a mass so large as the earth might become perfectly solid, so that at the instant when the circulation should entirely cease, the whole might consist of a solid central nucleus, surrounded by the external portion still in a state of fusion, and of which the fluidity would vary continuously from the solidity of the nucleus to the fluidity of the surface, where, at the instant we are speaking of, it would be just such as not to admit of circulation....

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