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Or your own honour to contain the ring,
You would not then have parted with the ring.
What man is there so much unreasonable,
If you had pleased to have defended it
With any terms of zeal, wanted the modesty
To urge the thing held as a ceremony?
Nerissa teaches me what to believe;
I'll die fort, but some woman had the ring.

Bass. No, by mine honour, madam, by my soul,
No woman had it, but a civil doctor,
Which did refuse three thousand ducats of me,
And beggd the ring; the which I did deny him,
And suffer'd him to go displeased away;
Even he that had held up the very life
Of my dear friend. What should I say, sweet lady ?
I was enforced to send it after him;
I was beset with shame and courtesy ;
My honour would not let ingratitude
So much besmear it: Pardon me, good lady;
For, by these blessed candles of the night,
Had you been there, I think you would have begg'd
The ring of me to give the worthy doctor.

Por. Let not that doctor e'er come near my house:
Since he hath got the jewel that I loved,
And that which you did swear to keep for me,
I will become as liberal as you:
I'll not deny him anything I have,
No, not my body, nor my husband's bed:
Know him I shall, I am well sure of it:
Lie not a night from home; watch me, like Argus;
If you do not, if I be left alone,
Now, by mine honour, which is yet my own,
I'll have that doctor for my bedfellow...

Ner. And I his clerk ; therefore be well advised,
How you do leave me to mine own protection.

Gra. Well, do you so: let me not take him then.

Ant. I am the unhappy subject of these quarrels,
Por. Sir, grieve not you; You are welcome notwithstanding.

Bass. Portia, forgive me this enforced wrong;
And, in the hearing of these many friends,
I swear to thee, even by thine own fair eyes,
Wherein I see myself, —

Por. Mark you but that!
In both my eyes he doubly sees himself :*
In each eye, one :-swear by your double self,
And there's an oath of credit.

Bass. Nay, but hear me:'
Pardon this fault, and by my soul I swear,
I never more will break an oath with thee.

* Double-dealing.

Ant. I once did lend my body for his wealth ;* Which, but for him that had your husband's ring, [To PORTIA. Had quite miscarried : I dare be bound again, My soul upon the forfeit, that your lord Will never more break faith advisedly.

Por. Then you shall be his surety : Give him this;
And bid him keep it better than the other.

Ant. Here lord Bassanio; swear to keep this ring.
Bass. By heaven, it is the same I gave the doctor!.

Por. I had it of him: pardon me, Bassanio;
For by this ring the doctor lay with me.

Ner. And pardon me, my gentle Gratiano;
For that same scrubbed boy, the doctor's clerk,
In lieu of this, last night did lie with me.

Gra. Why, this is like the mending of high-ways
In summer, where the ways are fair enough:
What! are we cuckolds, ere we have deserved it?

Por. Speak not so grossly.-You are all amazed :
Here is a letter, read it at your leisure;
It comes from Padua, from Bellario:
There you shall find, that Portia was the doctor;
Nerissa there, her clerk: Lorenzo here
Shall witness, I set forth as soon as you,
And but even now return'd; I have not yet
Enter'd my house.-Antonio, you are welcome;
And I have better news in store for you,
Than you expect; unseal this letter soon;
There you shall find three of your argosies
Are richly come to harbour suddenly:
You shall not know by what strange accident
I chanced on this letter.

Ant. I am dumb.
Bass. Were you the doctor, and I knew you not ?
Gra. Were you the clerk, that is to make me cuckold ?

Ner. Ay; but the clerk that never means to do it,
Unless he live until he be a man.

Bass. Sweet doctor; you shall be my bedfellow;
When I am absent, then lie with my wife.

Ant. Sweet lady, you have given me life and living;
For here I read for certain, that my ships
Are safely come to road.

Por. How now, Lorenzo ?
My clerk hath some good comforts too for you.

Ner. Ay, and I'll give them him without a fee.-
There do I give to you, and Jessica,
From the rich Jew, a special deed of gift.
After his death, of all he dies possess'd of.

Lor. Fair ladies, you drop manna in the way,
Of starved people.

Por. It is almost morning,
And yet, I am sure, you are not satisfied

* Advantage

Of these events at full: Let us go in;
And charge us there upon inter gatories,
And we will answer all things faithfully,

Gra. Let it be so: The first intergatory,
That my Nerissa shall be sworn on, is,
Whether till the next night she had rather stay;
Or go to bed now, being two hours to day :
But were the day come, I should wish it dark,
That I were couching with the doctor's clerk.
Well, while I live, I'll fear no other thing
So sore, as keeping safe Nerissa's ring.

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AS YOU LIKE IT.

PERSONS REPRESENTED.

JAQUES, 1 ment.

DUKE, living in exile.

SIR OLIVER MARTEXT, a Vicar. FREDERICK, Brother to the Duke, CORIN,

and Usurper of his Dominions. SYLVIÚS, } Shepherds. AMIENS,

Lords attending upon WILLIAM, a country Fellow, in love the Duke in his banish. with Audrey.

A PERson representfng HYMEN. LE BEAU, a Courtier attending upon Frederick.

ROSALIND, Daughter to the banish. CHARLES, his Wrestler,

ed Duke. OLIVER,

CELIA, daughter to Frederick.
Sons of Sir Rowland
JAQUES,

PHEBE, a Shepherdess.
ORLANDO. de Bois.

AUDREY, a country Wench. ADAM, conto

Lords belonging to the two DUKES; DENNÍS. } Servants to Oliver.

PAGES, FORESTERS and other TOUCHSTONE, a Clown.

ATTENDANTS. The SCENE lies, first, near Oliver's House; afterwards, partly in

the Usurper's Court, and partly in the Forest of Arden.

ACT I. SCENE I.-An Orchard, near OLIVER'S House. Enter

ORLANDO and ADAM. Orl. As I remember, Adam, it was upon this fashion bequeathed me: By will, but a poor thousand crowns; and, as thou say'st, charged my brother, on his blessing, to breed me well: and there begins my sadness. My brother Jaques he keeps at school, and report speaks goldenly of his profit: for my part, he keeps me rustically at home, or, to speak more properly, sties me here at home unkept: For call you that keeping for a gentleman of my birth, that differs not from the stalling of an ox? His horses are bred better; for, besides that they are fair with their feeding, they are taught their manage, and to that end riders dearly hired: but I, his brother, gain nothing under him but growth; for the which, his animals on his dung-hills are as much bound to him as I. Besides this nothing that he so plentifully gives me, the something that nature gave me, his countenance seems to take from me: he lets me feed with his binds, bars me

the place of a brother, and, as much as in him lies, mines my gentility with my education. That is it, Adam, that grieves me; and the spirit of my father, which I think is within me, begins to mutiny against this servitude: I will no longer endure it, though yet I know no wise remedy how to avoid it.

Enter OLIVER.
Adam. Yonder comes my master, your brother.

Orl. Go apart, Adam, and thou shalt hear how he will shake me up.

Oli. Now, Sir! what make you here?
Orl. Nothing: I am not taught to make anything.
Oli. What mar you then, Sir ?

Ori, Marry, Sir, I am helping you to mar that which God made, a poor unworthy brother of yours, with idleness.

Olí. Marry, Sir, be better employed, and be naught awhile.*

Orl. Shall I keep your hogs, and eat husks with them? What prodigal portion have I spent, that I should come to such penury?

Oli. Know you where you are, Sir ?
Orl. 0, Sir, very well : here in your orchard.
Oli. Know you before whom, Sir ?

Ori. Ay, better than he I am before knows me. I know, you are my eldest brother; and, in the gentle condition of blood, you should so know me. The courtesy of nations allows you my better, in that you are the first-born; but the same tradition takes not away my blood, were there twenty brothers betwixt us: I have as much of my father in me as you; albeit, I confess, your coming before me is nearer to his reverence. t

Oli. What, boy!
Orl. Come, come, elder brother, you are too young in this.
Oli. Wilt thou lay hands on me, villain ?

Orl. I am no villain :I I am the youngest son of Sir Rowland de Bois; he was my father; and he is thrice a villain, that says, such a father begot villains: Wert thou not my brother, I would not take this hand from thy throat, till this other had pulled out thy tongue for saying so; thou hast railed on thyself.

Adam. Sweet masters, be patient; for your father's remembrance, be at accord.

Oli. Let me go, I say.

Orl. I will not, till I please : you shall hear me. My father charged you in his will to give me good education : you have trained me like a peasant, obscuring and hiding from me all gentleman-like qualities : the spirit of my father grows strong in me, and I will no longer endure it; therefore allow me such exercises as may become a gentleman, or give me the poor allottery my father left me by testament; with that I will go buy my fortunes.

Oli. And what wilt thou do? beg, when that is spent ? Well,

* Plague take you.
+ Places you nearer to him in point of respect due.

# Villain means both villain in the modern sense, and a man of base extraction.

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