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BIBLE STUDIES.

PART 1.

BY THE SAME AUTHOR.

A HEBREW GRAMMAR, WITH EXERCISES :
PART I. The Outlines of the Language, with Exercises; being
A Practical Introduction to the Study of Hebrew.

12s. 6d. PART II. The Exceptional Forms and Constructions, preceded by an

Essay on the History of Hebrew Grammar. 128. 6d.
A KEY to the Exercises of the First Part. 58.
A HISTORICAL AND CRITICAL COMMENTARY ON THE OLD

TESTAMENT, WITH A NEW TRANSLATION:
Vol. I.-GENESIS. Hebrew and English. 188.

Abridged Edition. 128.
Vol. II.—EXODUS. Hebrew and English. 158.

Abridged Edition. 128.
Vol. III.-LEVITICUS, Part I. Hebrew and English. 158.

Abridged Edition. 88.
Vol. IV.-LEVITICUS, Part II. Hebrew and English. 158.

Abridged Edition. 78. 6d.

LONDON:
LONGMANS, GREEN, AND CO.

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PREFACE.

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ALMOST immediately after the completion of the fourth volume of his Commentary on the Old Testament, in 1872, the author was seized with a severe and lingering illness. The keen pain he felt at the compulsory interruption of his work was solely relieved by the undiminished interest with which he was able to follow the widely ramified literature connected with his favourite studies. At length, after weary years of patience and hope deferred,' a moderate measure of strength seemed to return, inadequate indeed to a resumption of his principal task in its full extent, yet sufficient, it appeared, to warrant an attempt at elucidating some of those numerous problems of Biblical criticism and religious history, which are still awaiting a final solution. Acting, therefore, on the maxim, ' Est quadam prodire tenus, si non dutur ultra,' and stimulated by the desire of contributing his humble share to the great intellectual labour of our age, he selected, as a first effort after his partial recovery, the interpretation of that exquisite episode in the Book of Numbers which contains an account of Balaam and his prophecies. This section, complete in itself, discloses a deep insight into the nature and course of prophetic influence; implies most instructive hints for the knowledge of Hebrew doctrine; and is one of the choicest master-pieces of universal literature. Love of such a subject could not fail to uphold even a wavering strength, and to revive an

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