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ACT V.

SCENE I.-A Road-side Inn.

Enter LESTER and PERCY.

PERCY.

It is unfortunate--they never came this road.

LESTER.
We surely cannot be so far from York.
Oh! we were made to listen to that fool!

PERCY.
We scarce could miss the road. Let us ride on.

LESTER. Where'er you will, I follow !

PERCY.

Here is an hostelrie—“The Oakapple”-I will inquire our nearest route.

(Exit into Inndoor flat.) LESTER (sits on a bench-L. H. wing). Well, we must hope. Without hope, why man would pine and die ! Hope is the light of life O'er the dark sea of time which man must pass, Ere his soul shake its prison-house to dust; And, in the uncreate eternity, Spread its white wings to roam 'midst realms of bliss ! There, o'er life's billows, blackened with the storm, Hope sparkles like a solitary star Shining 'mid midnight thunder-clouds ! Hark at her gentle voice! How sweet she sings, That man should not despair!

(Enter Landlord, flat.)

LANDLORD.
Most brave young cavalier,
I pray you stay not in the open air.

LESTER.

I'm waiting for my friend.

LANDLORD.

Do enter, Sir.
Ours is a homely house-but very clean ;
And what it lacks in looks it meets in measure !
Within I have choice company; a goodly set
Of merry, roaring blades—right jolly souls !
’T will do you good to see them !
Pray enter, good sir cavalier.

(Showing way. Exit.)

LESTER.

In truth, I'm sick at heart, and quite worn out;
Sorrow and sickness a long journey make
Of some few miles. First, I will find my friend,
And then will gladly enter.

(Exeunt Lester L. H.)

SCENE II.-A parlour in the Oakapple Public-house. A long table in centreSaw at the headBellows by his side. A number of rustics are seated at the table with pipes, glasses, and jugs before them. They all

shout out, Hurrah! hurrah! as the scene is opened.

SAW (striking table with hammer). MASTER Bellows, soilence—thy tongue wags like a pendelum !

BELLOWS.

And thine clicks like a clock—a cuckoo clock, that once a-day wants winding up !

OMNES.

Hurrah ! hurrah !

SAW.

Well, we all wants winding up zometoimes; so let's wind up our score and ’gin agean! Hammer my nailswhy dosunt cum ?

(To waiter.) (Waiter collects money. Rustics pay waiter.)

BELLOWS. And then a zong. “Old King Cole was a "_what?

(Sings.)

OMNES.

Hurrah! hurrah !-a song-a song!

BELLOWS (sings). “Jolly old sowl!” Where's lad and lass, old Saw ?

SAW.

Courting loike. Soilence.

(Striking the table.)

BELLOWS.

I loikes curting! Let's drink their helthes ! “ A jolly old sowl was he.”

(Sings.)

OMNES.

Hurrah ! hurrah !

SAW (rising). Soilence, gemlm,—Hit his with the gertist of distroiss I roise to say—as how dont ’ee see-as you all doo seeand as I does—and as how Bellows does! Where am I?

OMNES.

Hurrah !

(Voice—Dont 'ee see.)

SAW.

I axes pardon—for howsomehever harkard I be in standing on my legs-its all a hoeing to a combustralation of cercumstes. I therefore begs to propoze the health, the happerness, the prosperity of our landlord's daughter, pretty Mistress Fanny Swoipes !

OMNES.

Hurrah ! hurrah !

BELLOWS.

And all the little Swoipes, and Swoipsesses !

SAW.

Order-order-order !

BELLOWS.
May they larn to brew like owld Swoipes !

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Our Swoipes ha too much body—a'll keep a hundred yer!

BELLOWS.

And keep thee too, if thou 'lt paa un! Now, gemlm, I'll gee thee the owld song and chorus !

OMNES.

Hurrah ! hurrah !

SAW.

Now, Bellows, blaw away!

BELLOWS. Take keare I darnt blaw out thoy teeth, Master Car

penter Saw!

SAW.

Well, if you did, it would not be the vust toime you'd raised the wind at another's expense-old fire-shovel !

(All laugh.) BELLOWS. I tell you what, gemlm, there is none of you that have ever drunk at my expense!

SAW. True-true-old cinder!

BELLOWS. And file my eyes, if you shall ever laugh at it! Now, chorus, lads !

SONG.—“Old King Cole was a merry old soul,
And a merry old soul was he."

Chorus"Was he," &c.

( All stamp their feet, and dash their pints on the table.)

OMNES (when finished). Hurrah ! hurrah!

(Enter Lester and Percy, with Landlord.)

LANDLORD.

Bravely sung, Master Bellows.

(Saw comes to L. front, by Percy, who is standing

Lester having seated himself, by L. wing, on a form-Landlord takes head of the table.)

SAW.

Ees, considering he sang through his nozzle.--Mr. Swipes, we've had the pleasure of drinking the health of your dater, and zun-in-law wot is to be, in your abstinence. By your leave, gentlemen—(drinks).

LANDLORD. Gentlemen, I need not say-and when I say so, there CAN be no need of my saying it again--that you be the heartiest, jolliest, drunkenest set of rascals as ever whetted whistles in a landlord's house. I thank 'ee for the

young Gentlemen, I introduce these other gentlemen(hurrah)—to your notice, because, as they be not troubled with merrie looks, you can spare

'em some o'

yourn.

Gentlemen, it is my duty, and, believe me, it comes from my heart—(certainly)—my heart, to assure you, that I am sensible of your liberality (particularly that of those gentlemen who have not paid their last Saturday three weeks' chalks); and beg to drink all your good healths.

uns !

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